Undergraduate General Education Curriculum

The Undergraduate General Education Goals are designed to provide undergraduate students seeking an Associate or Bachelor's degree, with the intellectual tools to experience, explore and master new topics throughout a period of lifelong learning. To this end, at least forty credit hours in every major must be dedicated to basic literacy in English, mathematics, humanities, social sciences, and science outside the area of major concentration. Required 100-level courses in English, language, and mathematics should be completed by the end of the sophomore year. If a student fails to meet this requirement, he/she must enroll in these courses during the first semester of junior year.

Students may not combine catalogs to meet graduation requirements; the declared catalog must be the same for the requirements of major(s), minor(s), and General Education. 

The Associate of Science will complete Goals 1 through 6. An additional requirement is Critical Thinking PHLS 205 which cannot fulfill Goal 3: Arts/Humanities.

Goal 1 Critical Reading, Writing and Research

Students will write with clarity and precision, and read with comprehension. They will exercise the skills of independent inquiry, that is, to find, analyze, synthesize, and critically evaluate information in the respective discipline. 

This objective will be reinforced by critical reading, writing, and research throughout the curriculum, and culminate in a capstone course in each major. Wherever graded written work is required, part of the grade must be used to evaluate clarity and precision, and to reinforce the writing mechanics learned.

Outcomes:  Students will be able to

  • Construct a clear thesis supported by evidence from primary and secondary sources

  • Develop knowledge of linguistic structures, including grammar, punctuation, and spelling, through practice in composing and revising

  • Demonstrate conventions for structure, paragraphing, tone, and mechanics

  • Apply appropriate citation styles

One course: course

Select one course: course, course, course, course

Goal 2 Mathematics and Quantitative Literacy

Students will achieve an understanding of mathematical and quantitative reasoning and its place in today’s world. They should understand how to construct mathematical models as a means of formulating problems and be able to apply appropriate logical, quantitative, and technological methods to solve problems.

Outcomes:  Students will be able to

  • Organize, analyze, and interpret quantitative information

  • Select and apply a mathematical model, including the appropriate quantitative methods and/or technology, to find a solution to a problem motivated by a real-world situation

  • Communicate mathematical reasoning clearly and coherently

Select two mathematics courses: course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course

Goal 3 Human Expression in Literature, History, Arts and Humanities

Students will possess a knowledge of, and appreciation for, the variety of human expression found in cultures and civilizations of the United States and the world. This will be achieved by requiring students to take one course in history, one course in literature, and one course in arts and humanities. A course that is listed in multiple categories will fulfill one or the other criteria, not both.

Outcomes:  Students will be able to

  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the vocabulary and methods in the discipline of the course

  • Locate, assess, and utilize primary and secondary sources

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the variety of human expression

  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the relevant discipline's authors and texts, philosophical issues, historical processes and contingencies, or recognized creative works within their geographical, cultural, and/or historical contexts

Select one Literature course: course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course

Select one History course: course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course

Select one Arts/Humanities course: course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course. course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course

Goal 4 Natural Sciences

Students will gain a basic level of literacy in current scientific knowledge and theories and develop an appreciation for the natural world, in part through classroom and hands-on experiences by completing two science courses; at least one course must be a 4-credit laboratory science course. This will expose students to the scientific method and provide the critical thinking skills, necessary to make intelligent well-informed decisions. The College of Graduate and Continuing Studies will complete two courses; a laboratory is not required. 

Outcomes:  Students will be able to

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the process involved in applying the scientific method (gathering data, analysis, and interpretation)

  • Apply basic scientific knowledge and logic in evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of an argument

  • Apply basic scientific knowledge and logic in the decision-making process

  • Display a basic understanding of one or more fundamental scientific systems or theories

Select two courses, one must be a Lab (L): course (L), course (L), course (L), course (L), course (L), course (L), course (L), course (L), course (L), course, course (L), course (L), course (L), course (L), course, course (L), course (L), course (L), course (L), course (L), course (L), course, course, course

Goal 5 Individual, Society and Social Structures

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the patterns of human behavior and social structures, their related opportunities, problems, and issues.  This will be accomplished by completing one course in criminal justice, economics, political science, psychology, or sociology.

Outcomes:  Students will be able to

  • Identify factors that shape human behavior

  • Discuss factors that shape social structures

  • Articulate how the factors, determinants, and dynamics found in human behavior and social structures present problems or opportunities

Select one course: course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course

Goal 6 Ethics

Students must be able to think critically and make ethical decisions. Critical thinking begins with integration of course work from all general education areas and culminates in the capstone course in each major. Ethical decision-making begins with adherence to the honor code. Students must be able to recognize ethical issues and articulate ethical decisions. This will be achieved taking one course that includes the requirement that students deal with ethical ambiguities and articulate ethical decisions. A course listed in Ethics and Capstone may meet both Goal requirements, otherwise, the course cannot meet two Goals.

Outcomes:  Students will be able to

  • Identify major ethical, conceptual, and factual issues and stakeholders

  • Articulate ethical principles and whether they concur or are in conflict with one another

  • Present an argument supporting a position, relying on relevant ethical principle(s), anticipating possible counter-arguments and consequences

Select one course: course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course

Goal 7 Capstone Experience

Students must develop a sound foundation in an area of major concentration by meeting curriculum requirements specified for each program in the catalog.  Integration of reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills within the area of expertise culminates in a capstone course in each major. This General Education Requirement is to be taken in residence, at Norwich. A matriculated student who takes this course off-campus must seek permission from the department chair/director. 

A course listed in more than one Goal, cannot meet multiple Goals, except for one of the following. A course listed in Capstone and Ethics is permitted to meet both Goal requirements. A course listed in Capstone and Leadership is permitted to meet both Goal requirements. 

Outcomes: Students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the field by undertaking the capstone project(s) to address one or more questions and/or problems in the discipline.

  • Incorporate major scholarship in the field to synthesize a solution to a question(s) and/or problem(s) within the norms of the discipline.

  • Write effectively in accordance with the standards of the discipline.

  • Successfully defend finds from the capstone project(s) in a presentation

Select one course: course, course, course, course, course and course, course, course, course, course, course and course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course

Goal 8 Leadership

Students must develop leadership knowledge skills through one course with an emphasis on leadership. Such a course will ensure that students will acquire, demonstrate, and reflect upon leadership concepts and components. A course listed in Leadership and Capstone may meet both Goal requirements.

Outcomes:  Students will be able to

  • Acquire and utilize the concepts of leadership

  • Demonstrate awareness of various dimensions of leadership

  • Reflect upon the experience of trying to achieve a shared goal in collaborative work

Select one course: course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course, course