Physical Education Curriculum Overview

Professor Amy Welch (Chair); Lecturers Kylie Blodgett, Angela Carpenter-Henderson, Kate Harney, and Scott Maxham

A major in Physical Education emphasizes principles, problems and procedures for the improvement of individual and community health. The program provides an introduction to the Physical Education profession, and includes historical and philosophical implications and modern trends in program design with an emphasis on the study of the human body. Professional ethics, client privacy and liability issues are stressed throughout the program.students have access to the facilities and equipment of the Department of Biology and Physical Education.  There are various courses designed to develop the students’ interest in both pedagogy and the fitness related field

Goals:
  • Prepare students for teaching Physical Education in both elementary and secondary schools
  • Show commitment to a standards-based approach in the development of beginning educators
  • Recognize and incorporate safe programs and facilities, such as risk management and liability considerations within school-based programs
  • Develop and implement assessment plans consistent with national and/or state standards
  • Be knowledgeable in the area of accommodations for physical education programs to meet the needs of all individuals

Outcomes:
  • Each student choosing to become a teacher is responsible for developing a portfolio for licensure. The portfolio is constructed throughout the tenure of the undergraduate experience thus demonstrating individual learning and growth to become proficient Vermont State regulations and standards for teacher preparation.

Careers for this Concentration:
  • Elementary/Secondary Physical Education Teachers

Physical Education-Teacher Education (B.S.) – Curriculum Map 2020-2021 Catalog

New PlanGrids
Freshman
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
BI 101 Principles of Biology I (General Education Lab Science)4EN 102 Composition and Literature II3
ED 104 Foundations of Education c3MA 232 Elementary Statistics (General Education Math)3
EN 101 Composition and Literature I3PE 265 Lifelong Motor Development c3
MA 101 Mathematics: A Liberal Art (General Education Math)3PY 211 Introduction to Psychology (General Education Social Science)3
PE 163 Scientific Foundations of Health and Wellness c3General Education History3 
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 16Spring Semester Total Cr.: 15
Sophomore
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
BI 215 Human Anatomy & Physiology I (General Education Lab Science)4BI 216 Human Anatomy & Physiology II4
General Education Literature3 HE 200 Foods and Nutrition4
PE 223 Motor Skills Development I c3PE 224 Motor Skills Development II c3
PE 261 Foundations in Health Education c4PE 245 Assessment in PE & Sports3
PE 271 Outdoor Physical Education I3PE 272 Outdoor Physical Education II3
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 17Spring Semester Total Cr.: 17
Junior
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
PE 341 Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Elementary School c4PE 342 Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Middle-Secondary School c4
PE 355 Coaching:Leadership in Sports (General Education Ethics) c3PE 371 Physiology of Exercise c4
PE 365 Kinesiology c4PE 375 Adapted Physical Activity3
General Education Leadership1-3 PE 432 Organization and Administration in Physical Education c3
General Education Arts & Humanities OR SO 3203    
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 15-17Spring Semester Total Cr.: 14
Senior
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
ED 432 Curriculum & Methods of Instruction Capstone4ED 425 Student Teaching 1
or PE 426 Internship
12
PE 406 Readings in Physical Education (Capstone) c3   
SO 214 Racial and Cultural Minorities3   
SO 320 Drugs and Society (OR)3   
    
Free Elective3    
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 16Spring Semester Total Cr.: 12
TOTAL CREDITS FOR THIS MAJOR: 122-124

Certification in First Aid and CPR is required for graduation. 

Physical Education-Recreation Management Concentration (B.S.) – Curriculum Map 2020-2021 Catalog

New PlanGrids
Freshman
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
BI 101 Principles of Biology I (General Education Lab Science)4EN 102 Composition and Literature II3
ED 104 Foundations of Education3MA 232 Elementary Statistics (General Education Math)3
EN 101 Composition and Literature I (General Education Math)3PE 265 Lifelong Motor Development c3
MA 101 Mathematics: A Liberal Art (General Education Math)3PY 211 Introduction to Psychology (General Education Social Science)3
PE 163 Scientific Foundations of Health and Wellness c3General Education History3 
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 16Spring Semester Total Cr.: 15
Sophomore
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
BI 215 Human Anatomy & Physiology I (General Education Lab Science)4BI 216 Human Anatomy & Physiology II4
General Education Literature3 BI 253 4
PE 223 Motor Skills Development I c3PE 224 Motor Skills Development II c3
PE 261 Foundations in Health Education c4PE 245 Assessment in PE & Sports c3
PE 271 Outdoor Physical Education I3PE 272 Outdoor Physical Education II c3
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 17Spring Semester Total Cr.: 17
Junior
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
AC 201 Introduction to Accounting and Financial World3MG 101 Introduction to Business3
PE 341 Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Elementary School (OR) c
or 342 Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Middle-Secondary School
4PE 342 Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Middle-Secondary School (OR) c
or 341 Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Elementary School
4
General Education Arts and Humanities3 PE 375 Adapted Physical Activity c3
PE 355 Coaching:Leadership in Sports c3PE 432 Organization and Administration in Physical Education c3
PE 441 Advanced Exercise Physiology and Prescription c4Free Elective3 
General Education Leadership1-3    
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 18-20Spring Semester Total Cr.: 16
Senior
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
MG 309 Management of Organizations3PE 426 Internship (OR) c12
MG 341 Business Law I (General Education Ethics)3Free Elective 
PE 333 Management Sports Facilities c3   
PE 406 Readings in Physical Education (General Education Capstone) c3   
SO 214 Racial and Cultural Minorities3   
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 15Spring Semester Total Cr.: 12
TOTAL CREDITS FOR THIS MAJOR: 126-128

Coaching Minor 2020-2021 Catalog

Physical Education majors can declare a Concentration in Coaching.

The concentration or minor is designed to meet proposed national standards preparation in coaching for elementary through high school level. The primary goals are to teach coaching fundamentals, injury prevention, health awareness, motor skill development, adolescent behavior, and youth leadership skills. The following courses are required:

All courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher.

PE 163Scientific Foundations of Health and Wellness3
PE 224Motor Skills Development II3
PE 355Coaching:Leadership in Sports3
PE 432Organization and Administration in Physical Education3
Two courses from the following list:7-8
PE 223Motor Skills Development I3
PE 341Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Elementary School4
PE 342Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Middle-Secondary School4
PE 371Physiology of Exercise4
PY 324Adolescent Psychology3
Total Cr.19-20

Health Minor 2020-2021 Catalog

Physical Education majors can declare a Concentration in Health.

This concentration or minor is designed to add depth and breadth to a student's education in health and wellness, develop healthy lifelong patterns, and increase the marketability of graduates. Students must complete:

All courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher.

PE 163Scientific Foundations of Health and Wellness3
HE 200Foods and Nutrition4
Four additional courses from the following list:7-8
BI 220Introductory Microbiology4
BI 330Immunology4
HE 310Pathophysiology in Sports Medicine4
PE 261Foundations in Health Education4
PE 365Kinesiology4
PE 371Physiology of Exercise4
PY 211Introduction to Psychology3
PY 220Developmental Psychology3
PY 324Adolescent Psychology3
SO 320Drugs and Society3
Total Cr.19-20

Physical Education Courses

PE 107 Foundations of Physical Education 3 Cr.

A course designed to provide students with an introduction to the professional aspects of the physical education profession. Includes historical and philosophical implications with emphasis on modern trends in program design. Acquaints students with professional organizations and reviews career possibilities in the field.

PE 163 Scientific Foundations of Health and Wellness 3 Cr.

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the effects physical activity and fitness have on health and wellness, at the individual and community level. Additionally, exercise prescription for health and fitness and the principal of performance exercise prescription are covered. Consideration will be given to the nature of communicable diseases and preventative measures used individually, in schools and community. (Fall, Spring) 202140.

PE 188 No Norwich Equivalent 1-6 Cr.

PE 1XX Physical Education Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

PE 223 Motor Skills Development I 3 Cr.

This course teaches students to apply principles of best practice to the development and delivery of appropriate instructional programs in individual and elementary activities currently being taught in the public schools e.g. dance, throwing, catching, kicking, and gymnastics. Strong consideration is given to the development of personal performance and skill acquisition in order to more effectively lead practical lessons in school. Students must demonstrate an understanding of, and competence in motor skill acquisition. 4 hour lab. (Fall).

PE 224 Motor Skills Development II 3 Cr.

This course teaches students to apply principles of best practice to the development and delivery of appropriate instructional programs in team, dual, and secondary activities currently being taught in the public schools (e.g. basketball, volleyball, soccer, racquet sports) as well as non-traditional activities, e.g. Indiaka, Takraw, pateka, tchoukball. Consideration is given to the development of personal performance and skill acquisition in order to effectively lead practical lessons in school. Students must demonstrate an understanding of, and competence in motor skill acquisition and physical education pedagogy in the context of public school instruction programs. 4 lab hours. (Spring).

PE 245 Assessment in PE & Sports 3 Cr.

Introduction to construction, evaluation, and interpretation of assessments utilized in K-12 Health and Physical Education. Emphasis is placed on standards-based assessments and analysis of data to inform instruction. C or better needed in this course for PE majors.

PE 261 Foundations in Health Education 4 Cr.

This course will teach historical development, professional standards, philosophy and program planning, including current best practices in the development, implementation and evaluation of health education programs. It will focus on developing personal and social health skills, including decision making, interpersonal communication, goal setting and self-management skills. Also, this course will integrate teaching students media literacy, personal advocacy, and how to access valid health information, products and services and how to teach this to prospective students. 2 field experience hours. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite: PE 163 (Fall).

PE 265 Lifelong Motor Development 3 Cr.

This course studies the sequential, continuous age-related process whereby movement behavior changes. The class will cover information processing theories, theories of motor learning, effects of practice regimens and feedback and biological changes experienced over a lifetime, which affect motor skill acquisition. Understanding lifespan motor development is important for educators at all levels, special education teachers, physical educators, coaches, and adult fitness leaders.

PE 271 Outdoor Physical Education I 3 Cr.

This course provides students with a comprehensive background in warm weather Outdoor Physical Education. Skills in trip planning, risk management, equipment selection concerning use and care, and group leadership techniques will be covered. This class will prepare students to recognize the assumption of risk, attractive nuisances, negligence, and the standard of care when facilitating an Outdoor Physical Education program. Students will study and practice principles and protocols for administering safe, high-quality outdoor education experiences in canoeing and kayaking, mountain biking, hiking & backpacking, adventure, etc. Also covered will be topics in animal and wilderness conservation, nutrition, compass use and navigation, and environmental ethics. 2 lecture hours, 3 field experience hours. Prerequisite: PE 163, or permission of instructor. (Fall).

PE 272 Outdoor Physical Education II 3 Cr.

This course provides students with a comprehensive background in cold weather Outdoor Physical Education. Students will be actively engaged in winter activities. This class will prepare students to conduct classes in outdoor education during the winter, covering snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, ice skating, etc. Also presented will be, but not limited to, topics in animal and wilderness conservation, nutrition, mountain and cold weather illness and injuries, and snow science, such as avalanche assessment and ice assessment. An emphasis will be placed on preparing individuals to be active in cold weather under winter conditions. 2 lecture hours, 3 field experience hours. Prerequisites: PE 163, or permission by instructor. (Spring).

PE 288 No Norwich Equivalent 1-6 Cr.

PE 2XX Physical Education Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

PE 333 Management Sports Facilities 3 Cr.

This course is designed to help prepare students for careers associated with sport facility management. A detailed examination of facility utilization, including safety and security, scheduling, maintenance, and emergencies and emergency response will be applied to a variety of facilities. Additionally, the administration of a facility with special attention to preventative supervision, risk management, facility assessment and design, project planning, and staffing will be examined. Facilities covered will include but not be limited to parks, recreation centers, gymnasiums, aquatic facilities, fitness centers, sports arenas, tennis courts, and golf courses. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisites: PE 163 (Fall).

PE 341 Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Elementary School 4 Cr.

A course that provides classroom and laboratory experience designed to acquaint the student with basic materials, methods, and principles necessary to meet the educational needs of the elementary school child. Emphasis on curriculum development with consideration given to concepts of movement education and perceptual motor development. Application of movement theory to specific sports skills and activities. Health information protection and student privacy issues are included throughout the course of instruction. 2 lecture hours, 3 lab hours on site at Barre Town Middle Elementary School.

PE 342 Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Middle-Secondary School 4 Cr.

A course that places emphasis on ethics, principles, procedures, and techniques related to teaching health and physical education in the elementary and secondary schools. Methods of organization, types of programs, and content and materials of health and physical education courses. Laboratory experience provided in traditional and new media, self and peer evaluation, and micro teaching. Health information protection and student privacy issues are reinforced throughout this course. 2 lecture hours, 3 lab hours site at U-32 Jr.- Sr. High School.

PE 355 Coaching:Leadership in Sports 3 Cr.

A course with a strong focus on the philosophy, ethics, principles, and techniques of coaching individual and team sports. Identifying and addressing the ethical dilemmas pervading our sport organizations today will be emphasized. This course provides an emphasis on the organization of interscholastic athletics in relation to the achievement of education objectives. In addition, students will be prepared for the National Federation of State High School coaching certification. 3 lecture hours.

PE 365 Kinesiology 4 Cr.

A review of the structure and function of the skeletal and muscular systems with special emphasis on an analysis of human motion as related to human performance. 3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours. Prerequisite: C or better in BI 215, BI 216 or permission of the instructor.

PE 371 Physiology of Exercise 4 Cr.

A review of physiological principles of muscular activity with emphasis on the integration of body systems in the performance of exercise and various athletic activities. 3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours. Prerequisite: C or better in BI 215, BI 216 or permission of the instructor.

PE 375 Adapted Physical Activity 3 Cr.

A study and overview of activities and programs focused on meeting the needs of special populations. Topics include cognitive, neuromuscular, sensory, and othopedic impairments. Consideration will be given to teaching methodology, including, design and implementation of physical activity programs for individuals with disabilites. This course includes off-campus activities. Prerequisites: PE 341 (Spring).

PE 388 No Norwich Equivalent 1-6 Cr.

PE 399 Pilot course 3 Cr.

PE 406 Readings in Physical Education 3 Cr.

This course examines the current literature on issues facing future professional educators of an ethical, legal or pedagogical nature. Students are expected to think, read, write and speak critically about these professional issues in the physical education discipline. The submission of a professional portfolio is required. Seminar 3 hours.

PE 426 Internship 1-12 Cr.

A course designed to provide the Physical Education students with an intern-type experience in a professional setting appropriate to their career goals. A maximum of 12 credits may be applied to the student record. Prerequisites: Junior standing or higher, and permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer).

PE 432 Organization and Administration in Physical Education 3 Cr.

A course that emphasizes the study of administrative principles, functional organization, and supervision in relation to the total physical education program in grades K-12 and to managing sports facilities and sports programs. Major topics include personnel, curriculum, legal liability, intramurals, evaluation, budgeting and risk management.

PE 441 Advanced Exercise Physiology and Prescription 4 Cr.

This course prepares and qualifies students to work as personal trainers and fitness specialists in corporate fitness and health club facilities. The course bridges the gap between exercise physiology and the practical application skills of personal training. Advanced exercise physiology knowledge is presented to assure new knowledge and exercise techniques are acquired. Students will learn how to design and implement exercise prescriptions for multiple populations and as well as successful goal attainment. Students will be prepared to sit for certification examinations. 3 lecture hours per week and 2 laboratory hours component. Prerequisites: C or better in PE 365, PE 371 or permission of instructor. (Fall).

PE 450 Exercise Testing and Electrocardiography 4 Cr.

This course focuses on the theory and methods of administering exercise stress tests using different modes of exercise and consideration of different populations. Further analysis of information gained from exercise testing, studying deviations from normal, and applications of exercise test information in adult fitness and cardiac rehabilitation programs will be highlighted. Emphasis will be placed on the recognition and interpretation of normal and abnormal resting and exercise ECG monitoring. 3 lecture hours per week and 2 laboratory hours component. Prerequisites: C or better in BI 215, BI 216, PE 371 or permission of instructor. (Fall).

PE 488 No Norwich Equivalent 1-6 Cr.

Education Courses

ED 104 Foundations of Education 3 Cr.

This course examines the historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations of the American educational system. Current trends in education will be reviewed and evaluated. Issues affecting the role of the teacher, including school governance and finance, legal foundations, social influences, and educational reform will be explored. This course is a prerequisite course for ED 234 Learning Strategies for Education Majors. 3 lecture hours. (Fall, Spring).

ED 110 Creative Drama for Teaching and Learning 3 Cr.

Students explore creative drama as an educational tool for the classroom. Unlike traditional methods of instruction that rely on a teacher-centered model, creative drama flips the paradigm to promote a participant-centered learning environment where students create, perform and evaluate all aspects of their learning. Students learn the ways in which creative drama is in line with both proficiency-based models of education and personalized learning models. 3 Lecture hours. (Spring).

ED 188 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

ED 1XX Education Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

ED 234 Learning and Teaching Strategies 4 Cr.

Students practice and evaluate the most commonly used teaching strategies in elementary and secondary classrooms. Topics include planning, instructional objectives, educational technology and assessment of learning. All students participate in micro-teaching situations, and are introduced to current standards for their respective disciplines. These include but are not limited to the C3, Next Generation, Common Core, SHAPE and ISTE standards. Students are also introduced to Vermont's Core Teaching Standards (CTS), the inTASC standards for which the CTS were derived and the Vermont Licensure Portfolio. 4 Lecture hours and 12 hours of classroom observation required. Prerequisite: ED 104 (Fall).

ED 262 Child Growth and Development 3 Cr.

Students trace the development of the human being cognitively, linguistically, socially, emotionally and physically from conception to the onset of adolescence. Students examine various theories of learning, language acquisition, attachment, moral development and intelligence. Special attention is given to genetic, environmental, epigenetic factors and how they affect academic readiness and academic performance in school. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: PY 211 (Spring).

ED 288 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

ED 299 Education Pilot Course 3 Cr.

A course is permitted to run as a pilot without seeking faculty approval for one academic year. The section will include the title of the course. A student will not earn credit for a pilot course and the course when approved as its own course.

ED 2XX Education Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

ED 315 Special Needs Child 3 Cr.

An introduction to the developmental, emotional, behavioral, and learning characteristics of the special child. Topic areas include learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, emotional disorders and physical disabilities. Also included are federal and state laws, regulations, curricular adaptations and integration strategies. Prerequisite: ED 234 (Spring).

ED 351 Methods of Teaching Science to Elementary Students 3 Cr.

Students examine objectives, methods and content in elementary science instruction. Emphasis is on learner preparation, teaching and carryng out science activities. The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) as well as the Vermont endorsement standards of Elementary Education are examined and used for planning. This course cannot be used to meet general Education Goal 4. 3 Lecture hours. 10 Practicum hours. Prerequisite: ED 234 (Spring).

ED 360 Language Arts and Teaching Reading in the Elementary School 4 Cr.

A study of language development and reading, including an introduction to traditional instructional methodologies of reading and a study of the whole language approach to the language arts. Students will have opportunities to apply theory in various settings. Required for elementary teacher licensure candidates. Twelve hours of classroom observation are required in this course. A service Learning component is also attached to this course which will provides students an opportunity to work in the community in the context of literacy. Development of portfolio continues. Prerequisite: ED 234.

ED 363 Reading and Writing in the Content Area 4 Cr.

Students examine the structure of English and strategies to teach literacy skills to students in the content areas. Various methodologies for teaching decoding, encoding, reading fluency, vocabulary acquisition, writing and reading comprehension are emphasized in this course. Students learn strategies for integrating subjects; they learn models of assessment and instructional intervention. Vermont's endorsement standards are addressed as are the Common Core State Standards and the Core Teaching Standards. A practicum of 30 hours required. 4 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: ED 234; Restrictions: Education majors (Spring).

ED 364 Language and Literacy I 4 Cr.

Students in this course learn and apply the research on best practice for teaching literacy to elementary age children. Students learn multiple domains of language that relate to instruction including phonology, orthography, morphology and other crucial language systems and patterns upon which proficient reading and spelling depends. A series of dynamic strategies of teaching literacy skills to elementary children are introduced. 4 Lecture hours. 12 Practicum hours. Corequisite: ED 234 (Fall).

ED 367 Language and Literacy II 3 Cr.

Students gain in depth knowledge of phonetics, phonology, orthography and morphology which are the building blocks for effective teaching of word recognition, vocabulary and spelling. Various methodologies for teaching vocabulary acquisition and reading comprehension are emphasized in this course as well as story grammar and approaches to effectively teach writing. Students learn strategies for assessment and instructional intervention and work closely with the State of Vermont endorsement requirements as well as the Common Core standards. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: ED 361 (Spring).

ED 368 Curriculum & Methods in Secondary Subjects 4 Cr.

An examination of the curriculum and teaching strategies associated with the subjects taught in the secondary school, including English, mathematics, science, and social studies. Students will learn about the general methods for teaching at the Middle/High school level, but will concentrate on their area of content concentration in both their practicum and final project. Knowledge and research in child growth and development is used as a guide for determining the curriculum materials and procedures that are suitable for secondary education students. Students work with adolescents, develop curriculum, and teach lessons in the Middle/High School. Students will keep a reflective journal of all their experiences in the practicum. Required for Teacher Education Licensure secondary track. A Practicum of 30 hours will be required in this course. Development of a portfolio continues. (Fall).

ED 375 Language Development and Disorders 3 Cr.

Students learn how language typically develops for native English speakers from birth onward. The ways in which language development affect age-normed literacy development is considered. A wide array of expressive and receptive language disorders and language-based learning disabilities are examined in contrast to what has been documented for typically developing individuals. Students will gain in-depth knowledge of the theoretical explanations for the cause of developmental dyslexia since it is the most common language-based learning disability. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore or higher. (Spring).

ED 377 Instructional Methods in the Social Studies 3 Cr.

Students study several aspects of the socials studies including history, culture, society, politics and its importance in elementary and secondary school settings. Students examine historical content, how we have developed our understanding of historical events and how to think critically about topics related to social studies. Attention is given to pedagogical practice for social studies teachers with a strong emphasis on diversity, equity and inclusion. Students analyze examples of classroom behavior through the lens of multicultural and social justice education and they consider the challenging nature of managing diverse classroom spaces. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: ED 324 (Fall).

ED 388 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

ED 3XX Education Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

ED 401 Topics in Education 1 Cr.

In this course students are involved in individual investigation, survey, or a project related to education.

ED 403 Topics in Education 3 Cr.

In this course the student has an opportunity to select and read in a specific area of interest in education that is not available through regular course offerings.

ED 425 Student Teaching 12 Cr.

Student Teaching is the penultimate experience for students working to earn a recommendation for a Level 1 Vermont State teaching license. It entails a semester of full-time teaching experience totaling 13-15 weeks. For two of these weeks, the student teacher teaches solo, conforming to all of the duties and expectations of a regular classroom teacher. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required Education courses; senior standing; GPA requirements fulfilled; praxis exams(s) passed or equivalent and permission of the education program. Restrictions: R2 Education Licensure seeking students. (Fall, Spring).

ED 432 Curriculum & Methods of Instruction Capstone 4 Cr.

Students explore the curriculum and instructional strategies associated with the subjects taught in K-12 learning environments. Knowledge and research in child growth and development is used as a guide for determining the curriculum materials and procedures that are suitable for student. Students complete parts of the Vermont Licensure Portfolio and they collaborate with peers to demonstrate their competencies in the Core Teaching standards. Required for all Education and Physical Education students. 4 Lecture hours and a practicum of 30 hours is required. Prerequisite: ED 234; Restrictions: Education and Physical Education students. (Fall).

ED 480 Education Internship 3-12 Cr.

Designed specifically for Degree option Education students, this course enables students to be placed in a traditional or non-traditional educational setting for hands on service learning experience. Course assignments and required hours are specific to the internship placement, and the number of credits selected for the course. Students seeking a 12 credit experience must fulfill 13-15 weeks of full day internship experience in an assigned setting. Contact hours for fewer credits will match the University model for contact hours and workload. Corequisite: ED 432 (Fall, Spring).

ED 488 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

ED 4XX Education Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.