Management

Charles A. Dana Professor Michael Puddicombe; Professor D. William Jolley; Associate Professors David Blythe (director), Nasim Hosein, Sethuram Soman and Thomas Yandow; Visiting Associate Professors Andrew Bargerstock and Peter Appleton; Lecturers James Rogler and Kris Rowley. Adjunct Instructors Daniel Alcorn, Joseph Bosley, Duncan Currier, Jon Dellapriscoli, Bruce Faulkner, Renato (Ron) Merolli and Stephen Smith.

The Management program focuses on the management functions: planning, organization, leadership and control. Our students integrates knowledge from other disciplines within the school (accounting, economics and computer information systems), to enter into organizations with both a functional and an enterprise perspective. The program provides a breadth of required courses and the opportunity to pursue elective courses in such fields as organizational behavior, information systems, marketing, economics, human resources, and finance, thus enabling each student to align his or her interests with degree requirements.  Management students benefit from a unique leadership laboratory and are offered the opportunity for summer and academic year internships in a wide variety of organizations.

At the conclusion of the spring semester of the sophomore year, Management majors must select a concentration.

Accreditation: The Management program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs.

Management majors must choose from one of six concentrations:

Outcomes:
  •  Know the four functions of management (Planning, Organization, Leadership and Control) and be able to apply them within an ethical framework.
  • Apply the four functions of management within specific functional areas of business.
  • Understand the cross-functional nature of business and be able to apply the four functions of management within the overall enterprise.
  • Have basic competency in all of the functional areas of business.

Goals:
  • Develop the capacity to think critically about an enterprise, its present business position, its long-term direction, its resources and competitive capabilities, the caliber of its present strategy, and its opportunities for gaining a sustainable competitive advantage.
  • Build skills in conducting business analysis in a variety of industries and competitive situations and, especially, to provide a stronger understanding of the competitive challenges of a global market environment.
  • Provide hands-on experience in creating business plans, reasoning carefully about strategic options, using what-if analysis to evaluate action alternatives, and making sound business decisions.
  • Acquaint students with the managerial tasks associated with implementing and executing business plans, to drill them in the range of actions managers can take to promote competent strategy execution and to give them greater confidence in being able to function effectively as part of a company’s strategy-implementing team.
  • Raise the consciousness about the importance of exemplary ethical principles, sound personal and company values, and socially responsible management practices.
  • Demonstrate how the knowledge gained is integrated with other core courses of the business curriculum, show how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together and from experience see why the different parts of a business need to be managed in harmony for a company to operate in winning fashion.
  • Develop powers of managerial judgment, build skills in assessing business risk, and improve the ability to create results-oriented business plans.
  • Be able to operate effectively as a team in an unstructured environment under conditions of uncertainty and incomplete information.
  • Build proficiency in using personal computers to do managerial analysis and make professional management presentations.

Careers for this Major:
  • Leadership and management positions in for-profit and not-for-profit businesses
  • Leadership and management positions in, governmental organizations, and military organizations
  • Entrepreneurs planning to start their own businesses
  • Management in a family business
  • Management in the international arena
  • Management in service industries
  • Banking
  • Corporate Finance
  • Information Assurance Management

Management (B.S.) – Curriculum Map 2020-2021 Catalog

New PlanGrids
Freshman
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
EN 101 Composition and Literature I3EN 102 Composition and Literature II3
CS 120 Business Applications & Problem Solving Techniques3EC 106 The Structure and Operation of the World Economy3
MA 107 Precalculus Mathematics4MA 108 Applied Calculus4
MG 101 Introduction to Business3General Education Lab Science4 
General Education Leadership1-3 General Education Arts & Humanities3 
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 14-16Spring Semester Total Cr.: 17
Sophomore
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
AC 205 Principles of Accounting-Financial4AC 206 Principles of Accounting-Managerial4
EC 201 Principles of Economics (Macro)3EC 202 Principles of Economics (Micro)3
EN 112 Public Speaking3EN 204 Professional and Technical Writing3
General Education Lab Science4 QM 213 Business and Economic Statistics I3
MA 212 Finite Mathematics3General Education History 
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 17Spring Semester Total Cr.: 13
Junior
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
CS 300 Management Information Systems3EC 310 Money and Banking3
FN 311 Corporate Finance3MG 309 Management of Organizations3
MG 310 Production/Operations Management3General Education Literature3 
MG 314 Marketing Management3Major/Concentration Elective3 
PH 322 Money, Meaning and Morality3Major/Concentration Elective3 
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 15Spring Semester Total Cr.: 15
Senior
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
MG 319 International Dimensions of Business3MG 449 Administrative Policy and Strategy3
MG 341 Business Law I3Major/Concentration Elective3 
Major/Concentration Elective3 Major/Concentration Elective3 
Major/Concentration Elective3 Free Elective3 
Free Elective3 Free Elective3 
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 15Spring Semester Total Cr.: 15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR THIS MAJOR: 121-123
Concentrations

Computer Information Systems Concentration 2019-2020 Catalog

CS 100Foundations of Computer Science and Information Assurance3
CS 140Programming and Computing4
CS 301Software Engineering3
IA 342Management of Information Assurance3
Major/Concentration Elective (see below) 13
Major/Concentration Elective (see below) 13
Total Cr.19


Financial Economics Concentration 2019-2020 Catalog

EC 419International Economics3
FN 407Corporate Finance II3
FN 412Investments3
QM 370Quantitative Methods for Marketing & Finance3
Major/Concentration Elective 13
Major/Concentration Elective 13
Total Cr.18


International Business Concentration 2019-2020 Catalog

EC 419International Economics3
FN 407Corporate Finance II3
PO 215International Relations3
Free Elective (any Study Abroad course)3
Modern Language Elective3-4
Modern Language Elective3-4
Total Cr.18-20


 Leadership Concentration 2019-2020 Catalog

PY 210Psychology of Leadership3
MG 351Organizational Behavior3
MG 408Human Resources Management3
MG 409Organizational Leadership3
Major/Concentraton Elective 13
Major/Concentration Elective 13
Total Cr.18


Marketing Concentration 2019-2020 Catalog

MG 411Consumer Behavior3
MG 441Integrated Marketing Communications3
MG 416Advanced Marketing3
MG 426Marketing Research3
Major/Concentration Elective 13
Major/Concentration Elective 13
Total Cr.18


Sports Management Concentration 2019-2020 Catalog

MG 441Integrated Marketing Communications3
MG Elective 13
PE 107Foundations of Physical Education3
PE 333Management Sports Facilities3
PE 432Organization and Administration in Physical Education3
PE 426Internship6,12
Total Cr.21-27

Accounting Courses

AC 188 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

AC 199 Pilot Course 3 Cr.

AC 1XX Accounting Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent for Norwich course exists.

AC 201 Introduction to Accounting and Financial World 3 Cr.

Designed strictly for the non-business major. A survey course of accounting and financial concepts, including the basic accounting equation, financial statement structure, financial statement analysis, cost structures (fixed/variable/break-even analysis/overhead), cost systems, an introduction to basic capital markets, working capital management and present value concepts. Whenever possible the materials used in this class will use the context of the individual student’s major area of study or future professional area of employment. 2 Lecture hours. 2 Laboratory hours.

AC 205 Principles of Accounting-Financial 4 Cr.

Introduction to accounting principles and theory for the sole proprietorship. The recording of business transactions through the accounting cycle, from journal entry, posting, adjusting, and closing entries through work papers and preparation of financial statements, is studied. Related topics include: internal control, receivables and payables, the control of cash transactions, inventories, depreciation, intangible assets, and payroll accounting. Ethical business practices and client privacy issues are stressed throughout all phases of the course.

AC 206 Principles of Accounting-Managerial 4 Cr.

The completion of the study of financial accounting and an introduction to and emphasis on managerial accounting. Topics covered include: partnerships, corporations, earnings per share, dividends, bonds payable, the Statement of Cash Flows, the analysis and interpretation of financial statements, the budgeting process and cost accounting concepts. Protection of proprietary information and information security is re-enforced throughout the course. Prerequisite: AC 205.

AC 288 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

AC 335 Intermediate Accounting I 3 Cr.

Building on the foundations of Principles of Accounting the course provides a more in-depth study of accounting theory and practice. Beginning with a brief review of the accounting process, the course delves into the conceptual framework for accounting, the accounting standards setting process, and the hierarchy of accounting pronouncements. The course then explores the components of the financial statement package including such issues as the quality of earnings and the measurement and reporting of unusual, infrequent, and non-operating items; the Statement of Cash flows is also studied in depth. Accounting, reporting, and valuation issues surrounding cash, receivables, inventory and long-term assets are also covered including the impairment of tangible and intangible assets. Prerequisite: AC 205 and AC 206 grade "C" or higher.

AC 336 Intermediate Accounting II 3 Cr.

A continuation of the in-depth study of accounting theory and practice begun in Intermediate Accounting I. The course addresses the valuation, accounting, and reporting of both short and long-term investment securities, current and contingent liabilities, notes and bonds payable, and shareholders' equity. In addition, the accounting for leases, income taxes, pensions, stock-based compensation, earning per share, and accounting changes are also studied. Prerequisite: AC 335 or AC 205 and AC 206 with a grade of "C" or better and permission of the instructor.

AC 388 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

AC 419 Taxation I 3 Cr.

Designed to introduce the student to certain elementary tax concepts: tax rate structure, exemptions, deductible versus non-deductible expenses, depreciation basis, capital gains and losses, tax credits, withholding, and computation of the personal income tax. Within the context of the personal income tax, planning considerations will be stressed as well as legal and ethical issues concerning client confidentiality. Prerequisites: AC 205 and AC 206 grade "C" or higher.

AC 428 Auditing 3 Cr.

A study of the auditing environment, including legal liability and professional ethics begins with the concept of auditing and the auditing profession. Additional topics concerning the audit process, including internal control, evidence, sampling and EDP auditing and specific audit procedures are examined. In addition the nature and types of auditors' reports are studied. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisites: AC 336.

AC 441 Cost Accounting 3 Cr.

A study of the basic elements of cost accounting concepts and procedures. Emphasis is on how cost data can be used as management tools. Cost behavior and control, cost-volume-profit relationships, job and process costing, activity-based accounting, budgeting and responsibility accounting, flexible budgeting and standards, income effects of alternative costing methods and cost behavior, costs and the decision process, and philosophy and organization of the master budget are analyzed. Prerequisite: AC 206.

AC 442 Advanced Accounting 4 Cr.

An advanced course emphasizing accounting theory and practical applications in selected areas. Such areas include: partnerships, branches, business combinations, consolidated financial statements, segment reporting, forecasts, multinational companies, bankruptcy, and accounting for governmental units and other non-profit entities. Prerequisite: AC 336.

AC 450 Internship in Accounting 3 Cr.

The internship program is designed for students who want to apply their studies by working in a public accounting firm or in private accounting within a business, industry, or public agency. The student will be required to work closely with a faculty supervisor to develop and implement a structured experience tailored to the career goals of the student. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and written consent of the department chair and internship committee.

AC 488 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

Computer Science Courses

CS 100 Foundations of Computer Science and Information Assurance 3 Cr.

This survey of computing and information assurance fundamentals is required for computer science and information assurance majors. The course focuses on learning to use key concepts and terminology in information technology, computer science, networking, and information security. Discussions regarding computing ethics, safety, and professionalism are included throughout. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisites: Open to Computer Science or Computer Security & Information Assurance majors; others by permission. Offered: Fall, Spring.

CS 111 Personal & Professional Cyber Safety 1 Cr.

An introductory, self-paced, instructor-facilitated, online individual study course recommended for freshmen, or any student wanting to use computers, email, and social media safely. Topics include: information attributes to be protected by information security; reducing identity theft risk; preventing disasters by keeping adequate backups; preventing malware attacks; enabling firewalls; using strong authentication; resisting phishing and advance-fee frauds; rejecting telephone frauds; analyzing and resisting false rumors; using email effectively and professionally; avoiding embarrassment by controlling information-sharing; avoiding violations of anti-hacking and anti-piracy laws; and, avoiding accidental plagiarism. 1 Lecture hour. Offered: Fall, Spring.

CS 120 Business Applications & Problem Solving Techniques 3 Cr.

An introductory course in management information processing. The course explores the most important aspects of information systems with specific emphasis on business applications, practical usage, and current information. The student will obtain skills in word processing, spreadsheet analysis, and presentation tools using professional software packages. Structured problem-solving techniques will be emphasized throughout the course. Practical implementation projects and case studies will be used to reinforce topics such as computer, academic, and professional ethics for an information-based society. Prerequisite: Closed to Computer Science or Computer Security & Information Assurance majors. Offered: Fall, Spring.

CS 140 Programming and Computing 4 Cr.

An introduction to computing concepts and programming including the design and implementation of classes and complex data types. The course uses a high-level object-oriented language and emphasizes object-oriented design and implementation techniques. Good software engineering practice and language-specific concepts are introduced by means of programming projects that illustrate the importance of software quality attributes. This course serves as the basis for more advanced programming classes. 3 Lecture hours and 2 Lab hours. Prerequisite: CS 100 and CS 142, Grade of C or higher or instructor permission. Offered: Fall, Spring.

CS 142 Introduction to Python Programming 3 Cr.

A first course in fundamental computing concepts and object oriented programming using Python applied to problem solving. Designed for students with no programming background. Students learn object oriented programming concepts and syntax, variables and data types, input and output, control of the flow of logic, use of different data sources and structures, functions, modules and exception handling. Examples are drawn from diverse areas. 3 Lecture hours. Offered: Fall, Spring.

CS 188 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

CS 1XX Computer Science Elective 1-6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

CS 212 Assembly Language & Reverse Engineering 3 Cr.

An introduction to assembly language and reverse engineering, including relationship among machine language, assemblers, disassemblers, compilers, and interpreters. This courses provides requisite skills for computer forensics, malware analysis, and cryptology. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in CS 140. (Spring).

CS 221 GUI Programming 3 Cr.

A study of the design and implementation of the graphical user interface. The course will present fundamentals of usability and human factors in GUI design. One or more of the following will be studied and implemented in a student project: Visual Basic programming, Web programming, GUI code generators. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in CS 140. (Occasionally).

CS 228 Introduction to Data Structures 3 Cr.

An introduction to the basic concepts of algorithm analysis, data representation, and the techniques used to operate on the data. Topics include searching, sorting, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, hash tables, graphs. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite: C or higher in CS 140. (Fall).

CS 240 Database Management 3 Cr.

A study of the concepts and structures necessary to design and implement a database management system. Various data models will be examined and related to specific examples of database management systems including Structured Query Language (SQL). Techniques of system design, system implementation, data security, performance, and usability will be examined. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in CS 140. (Spring).

CS 250 Virtual Systems Administration 3 Cr.

This course includes a combination of classroom lecture on network and virtualization theory as well as a variety of hands on exercises to provide students with an understanding of how to configure and manage a VMware ESX environment. Students will also learn how to carry out administration tasks specific to the day-to-day operations of the NUCAC-DF. Some of these tasks will include how to build and maintain classroom environments, understanding requirements given by professors and instructors for classrooms, and overall maintenance of the systems in the Center for Advanced Computing and Digital Forensics. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite: instructor permission. (Occasionally).

CS 260 Data Communications and Networks 3 Cr.

An introductory study in fundamental concepts of computer networks and data communication including a survey of major protocols, standards, and architectures. Students use concepts and terminology of data communications effectively in describing how software applications and network services communicate with one another. Students read and analyze network traces to monitor communications, diagnose issues, and evaluate protocols. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite: C or higher in CS 140. (Spring).

CS 270 Operating Systems & Parallelism 3 Cr.

An introduction to the theory and structure of modern operating systems, including hardware abstraction, process management, memory management, system performance, and security. Specific attention to multi-threaded processing, semaphores, locking and interprocess communication. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisites: C or higher in CS 140. (Spring) 202140.

CS 280 Introduction to Data Science 3 Cr.

Students learn data science foundations of data collection, manipulation, formulation, summarization, visualization and analytics by applying and mastering the use of data containers (e.g."data frames") to problems or questions of focal interest. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: CS 142 or instructor permission. Offered: Fall, Spring.

CS 288 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

CS 290 Contemporary Data Visualization 3 Cr.

Students study and apply exploratory analysis and visual representation of data using contemporary software tools, algorithms and large data sets. Students discover, display and convey meaningful data relationships that target audiences may readily and correctly understand and use. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: CS 142 or instructor permission. Offered: Fall.

CS 299 Pilot Course 3 Cr.

CS 2XX Computer Science Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent for a Norwich course exists.

CS 300 Management Information Systems 3 Cr.

This course provides an overview of information systems, their role in organizations, and the relationship of information systems to the objectives and structure of an organization. Management of software projects, decision making with regard to systems development, and organizational roles with regard to information systems is also discussed. Prerequisite: not open to Computer Science or Computer Security & Information Assurance majors. (Fall, Spring).

CS 301 Software Engineering 3 Cr.

An in-depth introduction to the software development life cycle, the techniques of information analysis, testing, and the logical specification of software. Particular attention to project management, documentation, and interpersonal communication. Utilizing industry-standard methods, the student progresses through the phases of specification, design, implementation, and testing of information systems. Object-oriented design techniques are used to design new logical and new physical systems for business-related problems. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in CS 140.

CS 305 Advanced Data Science 3 Cr.

Students learn and apply advanced data science concepts and methods to a research topic of their interest chosen in consultation with the instructor. 3 Lecture hours. Restriction: Junior or higher or instructor permission. Prerequisite: CS 280 and EN 201 or instructor permission. Offered: Fall, Spring.

CS 315 Intro to Data & Web Mining 3 Cr.

Students learn and apply fundamentals of Data and Web-mining such as classification, clustering, association-rule mining and pattern mining through hands-on exploration of Web resources and other large sets of structured and unstructured data. Students examine and use a variety of broadly applicable, practical techniques to discover and extract meaningful patterns from both example data sets and real world data sources of particular interest to their academic and professional interests. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: CS 280 or instructor permission. Offered: Fall.

CS 323 Surveillance and Privacy in Germany 3 Cr.

An introduction to and comparison between legal, social, historical, political, and technical issues surrounding surveillance and privacy in Germany and the United States. In addition to surveillance and privacy, students research, analyze, and discuss issues of transparency, free speech, democratic dissent, social control, corporate and governmental power, and political parties. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in CS 100. (Summer).

CS 330 Ethics in Computing and Technology 3 Cr.

The course examines ethical dilemmas resulting from current technological trends, as well as the ethical standards and creeds of a variety of organizations (e.g., Association for Computing Machinery). Students learn to evaluate case studies from an ethical perspective. Students are expected to conduct literature surveys, produce bibliographies, write literature reviews, and present oral summaries of research as well as offer critical evaluation of writings related to ethics and technology. (Occasionally).

CS 388 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

CS 399 Pilot course 3 Cr.

A course is permitted to run as a pilot, without seeking faculty approval for one academic year. The section will include the title of the course. A student will not earn credit for a pilot course and the course when approved as its own course.

CS 3XX Computer Science Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

CS 406 Special Topics in Computer Science 1-4 Cr.

A study of topics chosen from areas of current interest that are not offered as part of the permanent curriculum. Topics are chosen by instructors on a semester-by semester basis. Students may take the course more than once provided each semester taken covers a substantively different topic. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. (Occasionally).

CS 407 Politics of Cyberspace 3 Cr.

This course explores the interrelations of modern computing and communications technology with politics, power, news, privacy, crime, and creativity. The course assumes only a rudimentary familiarity with the basic concepts and terminology of modern Internet usage and computing and is not a technology-focused course. Prerequisite: Sophomore 2 status or higher. (Fall, Spring).

CS 410 Computing Internship 1-6 Cr.

Written academic products are required. A supervisor within the sponsoring organization must provide a written description of the internship beforehand, and a final performance evaluation of the student. Students may take the course more than once, up to a maximum of 18 hours earned credit, provided each semester taken covers a substantively different topic. Earned internship credit may be applied to not more than two required CS/CSIA major technical/concentration electives. Prerequisites: Junior status or higher; good academic standing; faculty approval and CS/CSIA Chair or Director approval. (Fall, Spring).

CS 420 Computer Science capstone I 3 Cr.

A two-semester course sequence normally taken in the Senior year. Based on the subject matter mastered during their previous coursework, students (individually or in a group) identify a current topic to study in depth. As part of their studies, they develop either a working software project or produce a substantial data or hardware artifact. This course represents the first semester of a students work towards such a project. Prerequisites: Junior status or higher; Computer Science major. (Fall).

CS 421 Computer Science capstone II 3 Cr.

As the second semester of the two-course capstone sequence, this course serves as a continuation of CS 420. Prerequisite: CS 420. (Spring).

CS 430 Computer Science Undergraduate Thesis I 3 Cr.

The computer science undergraduate thesis is a two-semester course sequence normally taken in the Senior year. The course introduces students to the breadth of tasks involved in independent research, including library work, problem formulation, experimentation, and writing and speaking. Based on the subject matter mastered during previous coursework, students (individually or in a group) identify a current topic to study in depth. Students produce an original research paper. This course represents the first semester of a student’s work towards such a project. Prerequisites: Junior standing or higher, Computer Science major. (Fall) 202140.

CS 431 Computer Science Undergraduate Thesis II 3 Cr.

The second semester of the two-course thesis sequence. Prerequisite: CS 430. (Spring).

CS 437 Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence 3 Cr.

Students learn and apply fundamental concepts of machine learning and artificial intelligence through reading and synthesizing current research, hands-on application of artificial neural networks, construction of applications using machine and deep learning algorithms and contrasting current methods with significant, relevant alternatives. Students apply artificial intelligence paradigms such as expert system shells to approach practical, complex problems of particular relevance to their areas of study. Example areas include image and video analysis and classification, medical diagnosis and disease response, cybersecurity, drug discovery, dosage and content management in social media. 3 Lecture hours. Restriction: Junior or higher. Prerequisite: CS 315 and MA 306 or instructor permission. Offered: Spring.

CS 488 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

CS 4XX Computer Science Elective 4 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent for a Norwich course exists.

Economics Courses

EC 106 The Structure and Operation of the World Economy 3 Cr.

This course will introduce students to the operation of the world economy. Emphasis will be on the identification and description of economic concepts such as tariffs, multinational companies, stock markets, debt, international trade balances and international banking. These concepts will be developed utilizing examples from current world economic conditions. Prerequisite: Freshman standing.

EC 188 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

EC 1XX Economics Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

EC 201 Principles of Economics (Macro) 3 Cr.

Description and analysis of the American economic system in terms of basic economic concepts and the determination of national income and its fluctuation. Prerequisite: one semester of college mathematics at the 100-level or higher.

EC 202 Principles of Economics (Micro) 3 Cr.

Study of the behavior of individuals in making decisions on the allocation of limited resources. This course examines how these decisions and behaviors affect the markets for goods and services. Prerequisite: one semester of college mathematics at the 100-level or higher.

EC 288 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

EC 310 Money and Banking 3 Cr.

The principles and institutions of money, banking and finance as they influence the performance of the economy. The major topics covered are the nature of money, commercial banking and financial institutions, central banking, monetary theory, monetary policy, inflation and the international monetary system. Prerequisites: EC 201, EC 202, QM 213.

EC 388 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

EC 403 Comparative Economic Systems 3 Cr.

The study of major economic systems. Theories of capitalism, socialism and communism and their implementation by major nations are discussed. Cross-listed with ECON 401; not permitted to earn credit for both EC 403 and ECON 401. Prerequisites: EC 201, EC 202. (Spring, odd years).

EC 406 Public Finance 3 Cr.

An investigation of the effects of government expenditures and revenues on the efficiency of resource allocation and the equity of the income distribution. Topics covered include public goods, externalities, benefit-cost analysis, the structure of major taxes and expenditure and tax incidence. Cross-listed with ECON 401; not permitted to earn credit for both EC 406 and ECON 401.Prerequisites: EC 201, EC 202. (Occasionally).

EC 419 International Economics 3 Cr.

International trade and the theory of comparative advantage. Special attention is given to free world trade and economic development in other countries and groupings as in the European Common Market. Prerequisites: EC 201, EC 202. (Fall, odd years).

EC 488 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

Finance Courses

FN 188 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

FN 288 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

FN 311 Corporate Finance 3 Cr.

Development of the basic theoretical framework for decision-making in financial management, emphasizing the time-value of money and the analysis of cash flows. Areas of concentration are financial institutions and markets, financial statement analysis, the role of time value in finance, bond and stock valuation,capital budgeting decision process, risk and return analysis, cost of capital and dividend policy. Prerequisites: AC 206 or AC 201, EC 202, QM 213 or permission of the instructor.

FN 388 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

FN 407 Corporate Finance II 3 Cr.

Special topics in financial management including: international managerial finance, mergers and acquisitions, hybrid and derivative securities, working capital management, short-term and long-term financing, financial planning, leverage analysis and capital structure theory. Prerequisites: QM 213, FN 311. (Spring, odd years).

FN 412 Investments 3 Cr.

Methods of security analysis and portfolio management, including the current theoretical literature and thought. Discussion and analysis of current events and their implications for stock price behavior. Prerequisistes: QM 213, FN 311. Offered in the spring-even years.

FN 488 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

Management and Marketing Courses

MG 098 Junior Career Conference 1 Cr.

This third year seminar focuses on evolving career decisions for Business & Management majors. Guest faculty are drawn from University Board of faculty members and associates with extensive real-world business acumen. Students will experience developing skills to prepare for entering the global workplace in their chosen fields and professions. 1 lecture hour.

MG 099 Senior Career Conference 1 Cr.

This fourth year seminar focuses on evolving career decisions for Business & Management majors. Guest faculty are drawn from University Board of Fellows members and associates with extensive real-world business acumen. Students will hone and finalize skills to prepare for entering the global workplace in their chosen fields and professions. 1 lecture hour.

MG 101 Introduction to Business 3 Cr.

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the world of business. Students will learn about business organization and ownership and will survey union management relations, marketing, accounting, finance, international business, the legal environment, and the stock market. The course is designed to explore the relationship between social responsibility and profits in our free enterprise system. Prerequisite: Freshman standing only.

MG 188 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

MG 1XX Management Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

MG 224 Principles of Entrepreneurship 3 Cr.

This course provides an introduction to the creative and innovative managerial practices of successful entrepreneurship. This course reviews the significant economic and social contributions entrepreneurs provide to society, the intense lifestyle commitment, and the skills necessary for entrepreneurial success. This course provides an overview of the entrepreneurial process. Prerequisites: Not open to freshmen students.

MG 230 Personal Financial Literacy 3 Cr.

Students apply theoretical knowledge to consumer-oriented issues in the financial planning of the sort which must be addressed in an attempt to achieve a chosen lifestyle. The course is intended for a general audience. No prior knowledge of accounting, economics or finance is required. 3 lecture hours.

MG 261 Leadership in Coaching 3 Cr.

This course engages students in both learning about the journey of leadership as well as practicing that journey together. The course explores the philosophy and practice of leadership across many disciplines. It focuses on training students in over one dozen nuanced elements of leadership and culminates in guiding students, through a goal-setting exercise, to an understanding of how to use their leadership skills to develop and implement a plan of action in virtually any type of organization. The course is intended for general audiences. No prior knowledge of coaching or athletics is required. This course does not satisfy the General Education Leadership requirement. 3 lecture hours.

MG 288 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

MG 299 Topics: 4 Cr.

Selected topics in Management.

MG 2XX Management Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

MG 309 Management of Organizations 3 Cr.

A study of the functions of modern management: planning, organization, staffing, leading, and controlling. This study is applicable to the management of military, government, educational and non-profit, as well as business organizations. The ethical and social responsibilities of management and contemporary challenges such as the internationalization of organizations are integrated in all aspects of this course. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor.

MG 310 Production/Operations Management 3 Cr.

Principles and applied study of the operation of manufacturing and service organizations. Managerial tools and diagnostics, decision-making, and financial management are introduced. Problems of small, medium, and large-sized businesses are studied. Prerequisites: QM 213.

MG 314 Marketing Management 3 Cr.

This course immerses the student in the strategies and processes of marketing management - market analysis, segmentation, targeting and positioning, and the implementation and evaluation of marketing plans. When the student has completed this course they will understand how a marketing plan is developed and have the skills necessary to identify, analyze and solve marketing problems. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite: EC 202 or permission of instructor.

MG 316 Sales Management 3 Cr.

This course explores sales from the perspective of the individual salesperson as well as that of the organization, addressing topics including sales basics, proper attitudes, planning, necessary skill sets, appearance, presentation and the importance of each. The course includes case studies, examinations, and in-class presentations in order to ensure that students are well prepared to enter the sales field. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite: MG 101 or permission of the instructor.

MG 319 International Dimensions of Business 3 Cr.

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the basic concepts and terminology of international business, and to gain an appreciation of the differences in social, political, and economic conditions among nations and how these affect the conduct of business and trade between nations. Topics include comparative cultural, political, and economic environments, international trade theory and policy, foreign exchange and exchange rate determination, the dynamics of international business-government relationships, and corporate policy and strategy of the multinational firm. Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 202.

MG 341 Business Law I 3 Cr.

A study of the law and legal system as they affect business. Topics include the court system, constitutional law, torts, criminal law and contracts. Students will learn how morality and social responsibility are integrated into our legal system. Students must complete an ethical standards paper in an appropriate context. Prerequisite: Freshman 2 or higher.

MG 346 Business Law II 3 Cr.

A continuation of the analysis of the legal dimension of business operations that was developed in Business Law I. Special emphasis will be given to the legal environment as it relates to the accounting student's professional certification. Topics include bankruptcy, commercial paper, secured transactions, agency, corporations, and partnerships. Prerequisite: MG 341 or permission of instructor.

MG 351 Organizational Behavior 3 Cr.

This course considers the individual, the nature of organizations, and the issues resulting from the dynamic relationship of people in organizations. The course addresses such topics as learning, personality, motivation, organization structure, leadership, ethics, communication, and change.

MG 360 Health Economics & Policy 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to principles of health economics and public policy in health and social welfare. Topics include support for public health, policy intervention in health determinants, the relationship between government regulation and market competition, the demand for healthcare, and the supply of services. This course will enable students to apply economic reasoning to the health-care challenges facing society. Prerequisite: One semester of college level mathematics or QM 213.

MG 388 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

MG 399 Pilot Course 3 Cr.

A course is permitted to run as a pilot without seeking faculty approval for one academic year. The section will include the title of the course. A student will not earn credit for a pilot course and the course when approved as its own course.

MG 3XX Management Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

MG 408 Human Resources Management 3 Cr.

The management of human resources is one of the most challenging and critical aspects of contemporary organizational functions. This course addresses such issues as the nature of the American labor force, equal employment opportunity, personnel planning and staffing, compensation, employee well-being and job security, and collective bargaining. In addressing these issues attention is given to the ethical, legal, and moral questions involved. Prerequisite: MG 309 or permission of instructor.

MG 409 Organizational Leadership 3 Cr.

This course prepares students to apply leadership principles to the roles they play as managers. Students will discover more about themselves and learn more about the connection between the individual and the organization. Other topics include organizational culture, structure, group behavior, motivation, power, politics, organizational change, and workplace conflict.

MG 411 Consumer Behavior 3 Cr.

This course is designed to help the student understand the concepts of consumer behavior that provides the basis for marketing strategies. Students will gain an understanding of how consumers make decisions regarding the purchase and use of products and services and the internal and external factors that influence this process. Prerequisite: MG 314.

MG 416 Advanced Marketing 3 Cr.

In this course students will examine the key concepts and issues in developing a marketing strategy from the perspective of the corporate and SBU decision-maker. The course will take students through the process for formulating marketing strategies under various market conditions, for developing strategic and tactical marketing action plans, and how to evaluate and control a marketing plan and budget. Students undertaking this course will be required to use knowledge gained from previous marketing subjects in completing course assignments. Prerequisite: MG 314.

MG 426 Marketing Research 3 Cr.

This course explores the process and tools for data collection and analysis used to solve marketing problems. In addition, the subject addresses when marketing research is appropriate and how to define the research problem, as well as the role of marketing research in marketing decision making. This course will provide students with practical experience in the use of computer based data analysis techniques and make students aware of the biases and limitations inherent in various research methodologies. Prerequisites: QM 213, MG 314.

MG 429 Seminar in Advanced Management I 3 Cr.

A topics course addressing managerial problems in various environments. Prerequisites: MG 309, MG 310, FN 311, and MG 314.

MG 441 Integrated Marketing Communications 3 Cr.

This course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to develop appropriate communication strategies consistent with strategic marketing principles. The role of communications in the client organization's marketing plan is emphasized. The concept of Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) for coordinating the individual communication elements of advertising, direct marketing and public relations to achieve specific marketing objectives is stressed. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite MG 314.

MG 448 Small Business Strategies 3 Cr.

A course that integrates the functional areas of management-human resources, finance, marketing, and operations they uniquely affect the small business enterprise. Case studies and lectures develop the students problem solving abilities. Prerequisites: MG 309, MG 310, FN 311, and MG 314.

MG 449 Administrative Policy and Strategy 3 Cr.

A capstone course designed to integrate the students' undergraduate studies. Case studies, collaborative assignments, writing assignments and oral presentations provide opportunities to synthesize and apply the knowledge gained from courses in the management program. Prerequisites: MG 309, MG 310, FN 311, and MG 314.

MG 450 Internship in Management 3 Cr.

The internship program is designed for students who want to apply their studies by working with a business, industry, or public agency. The student will be required to work closely with a faculty supervisor to develop and implement a structured experience tailored to the career goals of the student. Repeatable up to 6 credits. Prerequisites: Senior standing, and approval of the department chair and internship committee.

MG 488 No Norwich Equivalent 6 Cr.

MG 4XX Management Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.