History Courses (HI) - Online Graduate

HI 513 Introduction to Public History 6 Cr.

An intensive graduate-level seminar teaching the technical skills and knowledge to work in permanent institutions in the service of society and its development, which acquire, conserve, research, mediate, interpret, communicate, digitize, and/or exhibit the tangible and intangible heritage in ethical and professional ways for the purposes of education, study, and enjoyment of the public. 6 credits.

HI 520 American Colonial, Revolutionary and Early National History 6 Cr.

This seminar explores American history from the era of contact through the early nineteenth century. The seminar is organized on a thematic rather than chronologic basis. It introduces students to the main themes and historiography of the period. Discussions and readings will lead students to examine areas of early seventeenth through early nineteenth-century American history and historiography.

HI 523 Archival Science and Management 6 Cr.

An intensive seminar teaching the technical skills and knowledge needed to identify, select, protect, organize, describe, preserve, and make available archival materials to users. Attention is also paid to increasing responsibility to engage and educate the public, diversify the historical record and the profession, perform tasks in digital realm, advocate for the profession, and enhance the public good in ethical ways.

HI 526 Hunter-Gatherer and Agrarian Eras 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the development of human civilization from dawn of human civilization and the development of agriculture to the era of European discovery and colonization of the New World. In addition to examining the forces responsible for the development of human civilization in this period, major historiographic debates, historical themes and problems will be explored.

HI 528 Western Legal Tradition, 1000 CE-1789 6 Cr.

This course examines the origins, sources, and nature of the "western legal tradition" from the rediscovery of Roman Law in the 11th century CE to the Age of Revolutions in the late eighteenth century. Students survey the development of western legal traditions, including theories and practices of governance through political institutions, legislative bodies, and courts of law, as well as informal and formal arrangements between states and empires designed to mediate relations of war and peace. The course concludes with the transformation of the western rule of law into an international and global legal tradition that continues to shape national and international law within and beyond the United States and Europe in the twenty-first century.

HI 530 Nineteenth Century American History 6 Cr.

This seminar explores American history from the Early National period to the eve of the First World War. This seminar is organized on a thematic rather than chronologic basis. It introduces students to the major themes and historiographic debates of this period of U.S. history. Discussions and readings will lead students to examine areas of nineteenth-century American history and historiography.

HI 533 Museum Science and Management 6 Cr.

An intensive graduate-level seminar that teaches the skills and knowledge to prepare students for employment in museums or similar institutions. Students will learn and apply the principles of acquisition, research, interpretation, communication, digitization, and exhibition of artifacts in ethical, accurate, and professional ways for purposes of education, study, and enjoyment of the public in the United States and across the globe.

HI 536 The Late Agrarian Era to 1800 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the development of human civilization from the late agrarian era to the beginning of the industrial revolution. In addition to examining the forces responsible for the development of human civilization in the period 1500-1800, major historiographic debates, historical themes and problems will be explored.

HI 538 Race, Gender, and the U.S. Constitution 6 Cr.

This seminar explores the issues of race and gender in American constitutional legal history from 1789 to present. Focusing on landmark Supreme Court decisions, this seminar provides a broad historical survey of the interactions between law, race, and gender in American society. The first several weeks explore the legal construction and regulation of questions and issues related to race, including slavery, reconstruction, and the 14th amendment, desegregation, national security and citizenship, and affirmative action. Then the second half of the seminar explores how American constitutional law has shaped gender relations through the regulation of citizenship, marriage, work, and reproduction. Course under development.

HI 540 Twentieth Century American History 6 Cr.

This seminar explores American history from the turn of the twentieth century and focuses on both internal developments and a greater American role in global affairs. It introduces students to main themes and historiography of the period, including the struggle for equality at home for women, immigrants and minorities, increasing American involvement in foreign conflicts, social, political and economic developments, and the relationship with the natural and built environments. Discussions and readings will lead students to examine other areas of twentieth-century American history and historiography.

HI 546 World History from 1800 to 1991 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the development of human civilization from the beginning of the industrial revolution to the end of the Cold War. In addition to examining the major forces shaping world history in this period, major historiographic debates, historical themes and problems will be explored.

HI 550 Directed Readings in History 6 Cr.

This seminar is designed to help students gain a detailed, graduate-level understanding of specific areas or topics in American or Global history and historiography that will prepare students for comprehensive examinations, capstone papers/theses, and teaching. Topics and readings are subject to the approval of the seminar’s supervising faculty members and/or Program Director.

HI 553 Research and Planning Seminar 6 Cr.

Students in his graduate Public History seminar will identify a Capstone Project for HI 563 and start the researching and planning process that Capstone. Depending residential locations, interests, personnel, and career goals, students will lay foundations to undertake significant Capstone Projects while interning at museums, historical societies, archives, battlefields, libraries, government agencies, genealogical societies, or similar institutions. The research and planning assignments will give students the necessary historical and methodological foundations and prepare them to complete their Capstones. COURSE UNDER CONSTRUCTION; AWAITING APPROVAL BY UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM COMMITTEE.

HI 563 Capstone Project 6 Cr.

An intensive 11-week Capstone Project in which the previous seminar's research and plans will be executed. This capstone will take form of an internship and will be supervised and evaluated by qualified staff members at institutions in consultation with Norwich's Program Director for Public History. Each student will be required to spend a total of 400 hours working on site as part of this Capstone Project. The Capstone Project could include any of the following: cataloging and creating a finding aid for personal paper collections at an archive, transcribing and annotating primary documents for a historical society, and planning and curating an exhibit for a museum either on-site or online. The expectation for the Capstone Project is that it should be added to the student's portfolio. Course under development.

HI 568 Capstone Curriculum Project 6 Cr.

Under the direction of Norwich faculty member assigned by the program's capstone director, students will design Capstone Curriculum projects that include detailed lesson plans, homework assignments, classroom activities, and assessment tools commensurate with learning outcomes for primary or secondary education social studies classes. Curriculum Projects must entail research in scholarly historical sources and in teaching methodology sources. Completed Capstone Curriculum Project must demonstrate mastery of the historical subject matter at the highest levels of Bloom's taxonomy and it must comply with the pedagogical standards set forth by the National Social Studies Standards. Length and scope will be approved by capstone director in conjunction with the assigned Norwich faculty member advising the project. Course under development.

HI 595 Residency 0 Cr.