Architecture (AP)

Courses

AP 106 Architectural Drafting 3 Cr.

The various graphic tools, techniques, and conventions are presented and the rationale behind their use is explained. In addition to the basic graphic constructions and multi-view projections, the methods of developing architectural plans, elevations, and sections are addressed. This course is for students who have had little or no prior introduction to mechanical and architectural drafting. 1 Lecture hour. 3 Studio hours.

AP 111 Fundamentals of Architecture 4 Cr.

Introduction to the basic principles and skills of architecture. A series of two and three dimensional graphic exercises is used to gain an understanding of architectonics, the intentional arrangement of space and enclosure to communicate human values while also introducing graphic techniques for communicating concepts and solutions. 1 Lecture hour. 27 Studio hours. Offered: Fall 202140.

AP 118 Fundamentals of Architecture II 4 Cr.

A continuation of the fundamental processes and technologies of architecture. Students learn the design process, explores interactive computer graphics (CAD) as a design tool, and apply these principles, processes, and skills to an architectural design problem. 1 Lecture hour. 9 Studio hours. Prerequisite: AP 111. Offered: Spring.

AP 188 No Norwich Equivalent 1-6 Cr.

AP 211 Architectural Design I 5 Cr.

The first in a sequence of design studio courses introducing the processes, judgment, and communications involved in the synthesis of architectural form. The influences of the human and physical contexts on form are explored. 1 Lecture hour. 12 Studio hours. Prerequisite: AP 118. Offered: Fall.

AP 212 Architectural Design II 5 Cr.

Second semester in a sequence of design studio courses emphasizing the processes, judgment, and communications involved in the synthesis of architectural form. The influences of functional requirements on form are explored. 1 Lecture hour. 12 Studio hours. Prerequisite: AP 211. Offered: Spring.

AP 221 Site Development and Design 3 Cr.

Course addresses engineering principles and design considerations involved with site design. Earth shaping, drainage, roadway alignment, parking lot layouts, code requirements and environmental factors are studied prior to and after design changes. 2 Lecture hours. 2 Studio hours. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 222 Human Issues in Design 3 Cr.

An introduction to the psychological, sociological, and physical factors that influence the design of architectural space. The fields of anthropometric data, ergonomics, and proxemics are addressed, as well as considerations for barrier-free environments. 3 Lecture hours. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 225 Introduction to Passive Environmental Systems 3 Cr.

Introduction to the impacts of environmental energies on architectural form. Emphasis is on the processes architects orders light, climate, gravity, and sound responses to achieve building geometry. Also addressed are concepts and strategies for responding to environmental hazards, and designing healthy buildings and green architecture. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: AP 118 or EG 110. Offered: Fall.

AP 241 Architectural Delineation 3 Cr.

A studio course in advanced graphic methods. Various rendering techniques, definitive design development, and the principles of construction drawings and architectural detailing are presented and explored through individual projects. 1 Lecture hour. 4 Studio hours.

AP 288 No Norwich Equivalent 1-8 Cr.

AP 311 Architectural Design III 5 Cr.

The development of the comprehensive building process as a synthesis of spatial, functional, and contextual concerns with emphases on building systems and materials are discussed. Individual and group problems, of a limited and defined scope are explored. 1 Lecture hours. 12 Studio hours. Prerequisites: AP 212, AP 325. Offered: Fall.

AP 312 Architectural Design IV 5 Cr.

The fourth course in the design studio sequence continues the development of a comprehensive building design process with problems of complex, but limited scope. The synthesis of spatial, functional, and contextual concerns, as directly linked to the understanding and employment of building systems, continues to provide a framework. 1 Lecture hour. 12 Studio hours. Prerequisite: AP 311. Offered: Spring.

AP 325 Materials, Construction, and Design 3 Cr.

Construction materials and systems are evaluated, selected, incorporated, and detailed in building design. Both measurable and immeasurable design responses to environmental energies are explored in soils, concrete, masonry, wood, and metals. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: AP 225 Offered Spring.

AP 327 Active Building Systems I 3 Cr.

A survey of contemporary mechanical building equipment and systems, including heating, ventilation and air conditioning. Emphasis on comparisons of design parameters, interfaces, and impacts on overall building form. Energy efficiency is addressed. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite: AP 225, MA 107. Offered: Fall.

AP 328 Active Building Systems II 3 Cr.

A continuation of Active Building Systems, surveying contemporary electrical, lighting, and plumbing equipment and systems. Emphasis on comparisons of design parameters, interfaces, and impacts on overall building form. Energy efficiency and building codes are addressed. 3 Lecture hours. Offered: Spring.

AP 388 No Norwich Equivalent 1-6 Cr.

AP 403 Architectural Seminar in History and Theory 3 Cr.

Focuses on one or more topics regarding the historic and philosophical contexts that influence architecture today. Topics range from the study of specific historic periods’ design to the diverse trends in current architectural thinking. This course may be repeated for credit. 3 Lecture hours. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 411 Architectural Design V 5 Cr.

The extension of the comprehensive design includes problems of an expanded scope and large scale, including building complexes and urban design. Individual and group problems emphasize of environmental factors, human concerns, and architectural form. A design portfolio, covering all seven semesters of studio work, including a written paper, is required. 1 Lecture hour. 12 Studio hours. Prerequisite: AP 312. Offered: Fall.

AP 412 Architectural Design VI 5 Cr.

The extension of the comprehensive design process to include problems of expanded scope and large scale, including building complexes and urban design. Individual and group problems emphasize the complex interrelationships of environmental factors, human concerns, and architectural form. 1 Lecture hour. 12 Studio hours. Prerequisite: AP 312. Offered: Spring.

AP 414 Architectural Seminar In Design 3 Cr.

Investigates one or more specific concepts, issues, or topics related to architectural design and its associated disciplines, such as urban, landscape, interior, and visual design. Requires a graduate level paper or project. Permitted to be repeated once under a different topic. Cross-listed with AP 514; not permitted to earn credit in both AP 414 and AP 514. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 424 Architectural Seminar in Technology 3 Cr.

Focuses on one or more of the specific issues, topics, or skills related to technologies in architecture today. Topics range from advanced materials and construction systems to energy-conserving design; from environmental issues to hands-on building experiences. Permitted to be repeated once under a different topic. Cross-listed with AP 520; not permitted to earn credit for both AP 424 and AP 520. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: AP 325 Offered: Occasionally.

AP 431 Design Thinking and Innovation 3 Cr.

Examines creativity as the ability to turn ideas into action in development, management, evolution, and broad context of emerging technologies and associated ventures. Students gain an understanding of the key tenets of design thinking and a sense for ways they can incorporate them into their work using ‘visual brand languages’ for emerging technologies, foundation exercises in creativity, and case studies based on pivotal products from the past 50 years. Prerequisite. Sophomore or higher. Offered: Spring.

AP 434 Architectural Seminar in Process 3 Cr.

Focuses on one or more specific topics regarding the current and future practice of architecture: what architects do, and how they do it. Topics range from design techniques to office management and from specialties within the practice, to the legal environmental, and social forces that influence it. Permitted to be repeated once under a different topic. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Cross listed with AP 534. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 436 Project Delivery and Documentation 4 Cr.

Relationships between the formal methods of project delivery and the architectural office are discussed. The project delivery process and the methods of communication and the documentation involved provide a detail study of typical office procedures. The studio component provides practical experience of the typical project delivery process. Student learn communication is multi-layered acting as a foundation for the production of contemporary architecture. Various tools ranging from computer aided design to conceptual organization schema in both the practice of typical architectural project delivery and the development of new means of communication and production are used. 2 Lecture hours. 4 Studio hours. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 455 Special Projects in Architecture 1-3 Cr.

An execution of a student-selected project related to architectural design, history/theory, process, or technology focuses on in-depth independent research, development, and a formal written and/or graphic presentation of an architecturally-related topic not otherwise covered in course offerings. The student must secure a faculty member who will agree to serve as advisor/evaluator for the project. Number lecture hours based on credits sought. This course may be repeated up to 9 credits. Prerequisite: Junior or higher. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 456 Senior Project 4 Cr.

AP 488 No Norwich Equivalent 1-6 Cr.

AP 501 Architectural Theory 3 Cr.

A course that introduces implicit and hidden motivations that influence architecture. Basic human values and beliefs leading to classic philosophies and aesthetics are explored. Major historic and contemporary propositions on architecture are surveyed. Requires a graduate-level paper or project. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: FA 202.

AP 504 Architectural Seminar in History and Theory 3 Cr.

Focuses on one or more specific issues and topics regarding the historic and philosophical contexts that influence architecture today. Topics range from the study of specific historic periods or schools of thought regarding design to the diverse trends in current architectural thinking. Requires a graduate-level paper or project. This course may be repeated for credit. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: FA 202, FA 308. Cross listed with AP403. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 511 Architectural Studio VII 5 Cr.

Introspective problems intended to broaden and deepen individual understanding of the processes, theories, and systems that influence the design of the built environment are discussed. Emphasis is on thorough examination of all aspects of building. Includes the identification, program preparation, and approval of the capstone project(s) to be undertaken in AP 512. 1 Lecture hour. 12 Studio hours. Prerequisite: Master in Architecture major. Offered: Fall.

AP 512 Architectural Studio VIII 5 Cr.

Introspective problems are intended to broaden and deepen individual understanding of the processes, theories, and systems that influence the design of the built environment are discussed. Emphasis is on thorough examination of all aspects of building. A single comprehensive design project that represents a capstone experience for the 5-year design sequence is required. 1 Lecture hour. 12 Studio hours. Prerequisite: AP 511. Offered: Spring.

AP 514 Architectural Seminar in Design 3 Cr.

Investigates one or more specific concepts, issues, or topics related to architectural design and its associated disciplines, such as urban, landscape, interior, and visual design. Requires a graduate level paper or project. This course may be repeated for credit. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Cross listed with AP 414. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 520 Architectural Seminar in Technology 3 Cr.

Focuses on one or more of the specific issues, topics, or skills related to technologies in architecture today. Topics range from advanced materials and construction systems to energy-conserving design; from environmental issues to hands-on building experiences. Requires a graduate level paper or project. This course may be repeated for credit. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: AP 114, AP 325. Cross listed with AP 424. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 525 Architectural Thesis Research 5 Cr.

The course is independent research to display a mastery of defining an architectural problem, including the investigation and discussion of the procedural, physical, and intellectual limits of this problem. The course culminates with the publication of an architectural program and a theoretical statement as well as the generation of all contextual information and design strategies as the basis for AP 526. 3 Lecture hours. 6 Studio hours. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Offered: Fall.

AP 526 Architectural Thesis 5 Cr.

Execution of a singular design or design-related project based on independent research and preliminary design work produced in AP 525 and of sufficient depth and breadth to display a mastery of design skills and comprehensive understanding of the architectural issues related to form, process, judgment, representation, and communication. The work is done under the guidance of a thesis advisor chosen by the student. 2 Lecture hours. 12 Studio hours. Prerequisite: AP 525 grade of C or higher. Offered: Spring.

AP 531 Architectural Internship 6 Cr.

This course is a bridge between academic experience and professional practice. The learning experience moves in both directions. Students apply knowledge learned in the classroom to bring practical experience. Students secure a position with an architectural, or an architecturally-related/construction-related, firm for a period of at least eight weeks. This position must be approved by the course instructor. The firm must be willing to submit periodic and final evaluations of the student's performance. Students must maintain a journal and write a paper related to professional practice. XX lecture hours. Prerequisite: Master in Architecture major. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 533 Professional Practice 3 Cr.

Investigation into the issues related to the professional practice of architecture in contemporary American society. Topics include project management, finance and economics; business and practice management; and laws and regulations governing the profession. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: Master in Architecture major. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 534 Architectural Seminar in Process 3 Cr.

Focuses on one or more specific topics regarding the current and future practice of architecture: what architects do, and how they do it. Topics range from design techniques to office management and from specialties within the practice, to the legal environmental and social forces that influence it. This course may be repeated for credit. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: Instructor approval, Master in Architecture major. Cross listed with AP 434. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 555 Special Projects in Architecture 1-3 Cr.

An execution of a singular project related to architectural design, history/theory, process or technology selected by the individual student. Students, independently research, development, and a provide a written and/or graphic presentation of an architecturally-related topic not otherwise covered in course offerings. Students must secure a faculty member who agrees to serve as advisor/evaluator for the project. Number lecture hours depends on the credits sought. Prerequisite: Master in Architecture major. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 558 Global Issues in Architecture 3 Cr.

This course provides an in-depth analysis, discussion, and research into contemporary issues that impact the profession of architecture and architectural design. The nature of the material is relevant to the complex, changing nature of the profession. Topics include global concerns such as sustainability, cultural changes, conservation and preservation, information technology, and the emerging role of the architect. The course reflects the values embodied in the profession, the architecture program, and the university. Course material is synthesized and applied to demonstrates critical thinking, teamwork, creativity and community service. 3 hours of seminar. Prerequisite: Master in Architecture major. Offered: Occasionally.

AP 604 History & Theory of 20th-Century Architecture 3 Cr.

Surveys global architectural history and theory from the 1920s through the 1980s, including modernism and its variants, receptions, reactions, and critiques. Introduces architectural criticism and research methods for the built environment. Includes case studies, substantial research and writing, and discussion of texts in seminar format. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisite: AP 605. Restriction: MArch III majors. Offered: Spring.

AP 605 Analysis of Architectural Icons 3 Cr.

Students study and analyze select examples from architectural history and theory (pre-history through the early decades of the 20th century). Students achieve a global and comparative familiarity with a representative range of buildings, urban forms, and major aspects of architectural culture. Emphasis is on understanding and applying the core concepts and analytical tools relevant for architectural discourse and interpretation. 3 Lecture hours. Restricted: M.Arch. III majors. Offered: Fall.

AP 611 Architectural Design I 5 Cr.

Students learn and practice the basic principles and skills that constitute the discipline of architecture. Students investigate the design process and urban analysis, explore interactive computer graphics (CAD) as a design tool, and apply these principles, processes, and skills to an architectural design problem. 1 Lecture hour. 12 Studio hours. Restriction: M.Arch. III majors. Offered: Fall.

AP 612 Architectural Design II 5 Cr.

The second Masters level design studio course introduces the processes, judgment, and communications involved in the synthesis of architectural form. Through a focused series of individual and group projects, students explore and understand the influences of human and physical contexts as well as functional requirements on architectural form. One hour of lecture and three 4-hour studios per week. 1 Lecture hour. 12 Studio hours. Restriction: M.Arch. III majors. Offered: Spring.

AP 613 Architectural Design III 5 Cr.

The development of the comprehensive building process at the graduate level as a synthesis of spatial, functional, and contextual concerns with emphases on building systems and materials. Individual and group problems are of a limited and defined scope. 1 Lecture hour. 12 Studio hours. Prerequisite: AP 612 Architectural Design II MArch. Restriction: MArch III majors. Offered: Fall.

AP 614 Architectural Design IV 5 Cr.

Elective problem-oriented studios offered to fourth year students by various faculty members. The extension of the comprehensive design process to include problems of expanded scope and large scale, including building complexes and urban design. Individual and group problems emphasize the complex interrelationships of environmental factors, human concerns, and architectural form. 1 Lecture hour. 12 Studio hours. Prerequisite: AP 613 Architectural Design III MArch. Restriction: MArch III majors. Offered: Fall.

AP 621 Site Development and Design 3 Cr.

Students learn the engineering principles and design considerations involved with site design. Earth shaping, drainage, roadway alignment, parking lot layouts, code requirements and environmental factors are studied prior to and after design changes. 2 Lecture hours. 2 Studio hours. (Fall).

AP 625 Introduction to Passive Environmental Design 3 Cr.

Through coordinated lectures, demonstrations, and projects, the impacts of environmental energies on architectural form and the greater environment are introduced and explored. Emphasis is given to the processes by which the architect orders light, climate, gravity, and sound responses to achieve building geometry. The course also addresses concepts and strategies for responding to environmental hazards, and designing healthy buildings and green architecture. 3 Lecture hours. Restriction: M.Arch. III majors. Offered: Fall.

AP 626 Materials, Design, and Construction 3 Cr.

An introduction to the processes by which construction materials and systems are evaluated, selected, incorporated, and detailed in building design. Both measurable and immeasurable design responses to environmental energies are explored in soils, concrete, masonry, wood, and metals. 3 Lecture hours. Restriction: MArch III majors. Offered: Fall.

AP 627 Active Building Systems I 3 Cr.

A survey of contemporary mechanical building equipment and systems, including heating, ventilation and air conditioning. Emphasis is placed on comparisons of design parameters, interfaces, and impacts on overall building form. Energy efficiency is addressed. Students pursue independent research in support of coursework. 3 Lecture hours. Prerequisite: AP 625 Introduction to Passive Environmental Systems MArch. Restriction: M.Arch. III majors. Offered: Fall.

AP 630 Wood, Steel and Concrete Structures 4 Cr.

This course builds directly on the material learned in Statics and Mechanics of Materials and is specifically direct to the study of the response of structural systems to various loadings. Gravity and lateral loads as well as load combinations on a structure are developed using appropriate building codes. The response of the structural system to imposed loading is studied by classical and computer analysis techniques. This course introduces the students to applications; the design of simple structures of wood, steel, concrete and other materials that meet the appropriate building code. Students will create a design project at the graduate level that evidences a comprehensive and holistic understanding of structural engineering for architectural projects. 4 Lecture hours. Prerequisites: CE 351, AP 632 (Spring).

AP 632 Statics and Mechanics Materials 4 Cr.

A study of elementary, primarily two dimensional engineering mechanics. Fundamental concepts and basic laws of statics, force systems, structures, and support reactions for loading patterns. Stress-strain relationships to forces: concepts and applications. Consideration of engineering materials and their suitability in various structures and mechanisms. Students will create a design project at the graduate level that evidences a comprehensive and holistic understanding of two dimensional engineering mechanics. 4 Lecture hours. Prerequisites: MA 107, PS 201 (Spring).

AP 636 Project Delivery and Documentation 4 Cr.

This course introduces the basic history and theory of architectural programming, production and trends in the architectural office, including technology and sustainability. The project delivery process, and the methods of communication and documentation it involves, provides an opportunity for students to study typical office procedures. Students examine architect’s professional conduct as related to various ethical conundrums which present themselves during everyday practice. 4 Lecture hours. 2 Lab hours. Restriction: MArch III majors. Offered: Fall, Spring.