Exercise Science

Faculty: Assistant Professors Thomas Roberge and Amanda Tepfer, Dept Chair; Lecturer Kylie Blodgett

Information

Goals:
  • The goals of the Exercise Science major are to provide undergraduate students with the following:
    • A fundamental background in human physiology
    • An understanding of how exercise can impact the human body in a positive manner
    • A solid foundation in the natural sciences
    • To produce highly trained individuals to educate others on how to exercise appropriately without causing undue harm
Outcomes:
  • Exercise Science students will acquire scientific literacy related to the biological and exercise sciences. This will be demonstrated through written and oral expression.

  • Exercise Science students will conduct laboratory research to allow students to learn hands-on experimental methodology, approach, design, and statistical analysis.

  • The Exercise Science major will give students the knowledge, skills and abilities to become gainfully employed upon graduation or secure a position at a graduate school in a related field. 


Careers for this Major:
  • Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Specialist; Exercise Technologist in cardiology suites
  • Personal Trainer/Exercise leader
  • Strength and Conditioning Coach for College, University and professional sports programs
  • Laboratory Researcher in exercise science
  • Sports Nutritionist
  • Corporate Fitness Program Director
  • Sports and Wellness Program Instructor and Director
  • Health Promotion Specialist

B.S. in Exercise Science Curriculum Map 2018-2019 Catalog

Print PDF Curriculum Map
 

New PlanGrids
Freshman
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
BI 101 Principles of Biology I (General Education Lab Science)4CH 101 Introduction to General Chemistry (General Education Lab Science)4
EN 101 Composition and Literature I3EN 102 Composition and Literature II3
General Education History3 MA 232 Elementary Statistics (General Education Math)3
MA 107 Precalculus Mathematics (General Education Math)4PE 107 Foundations of Physical Education c3
PE 163 Scientific Foundations of Health and Wellness3PE 265 Lifelong Motor Development c3
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 17Spring Semester Total Cr.: 16
Sophomore
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
BI 215 Human Anatomy & Physiology I4BI 216 Human Anatomy & Physiology II4
CH 102 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry4BI 253 Foods and Nutrition4
PE 261 Foundations in Health Education c4General Education Literature3 
PE 271 Outdoor Physical Education I3PE 272 Outdoor Physical Education II3
   PY 211 Introduction to Psychology (General Education Social Science)3
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 15Spring Semester Total Cr.: 17
Junior
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
General Education Leadership1-3 BI 364 Pathophysiology in Sports Medicine c4
PE 355 Coaching:Leadership in Sports (General Education Ethics) c3General Education Arts & Humanities3 
PE 365 Kinesiology c4PE 371 Physiology of Exercise c4
PE 333 Management Sports Facilities c3PE 432 Organization and Administration in Physical Education c3
PS 201 General Physics I4Free Elective3 
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 15-17Spring Semester Total Cr.: 17
Senior
Fall Cr. Comp. Spring Cr. Comp.
BI 401 Senior Seminar (Capstone) C3PE 426 Internship (OR Free Elective)12
BI 440 Reading and Research (OR Free Elective)3-4   
PE 441 Advanced Exercise Physiology and Prescription C4   
PE 450 Exercise Testing and Electrocardiography C4   
      
Fall Semester Total Cr.: 14-15Spring Semester Total Cr.: 12
TOTAL CREDITS FOR THIS MAJOR: 123-126
  •  All sciences must be taken as lab sciences (4 credit courses)
  • Certification in First Aid & CPR is also required for graduation

Biology Courses

BI 101 Principles of Biology I 4 Cr.

This course is an introduction to biochemistry, cell structure, metabolism, and protein synthesis, as well as human anatomy and physiology. Dissection of living and preserved animals is required. Credit may not be earned for both BI 101 and BI 122. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Offered Fall.

BI 102 Principles of Biology II 4 Cr.

This course explores genetics, evolutionary theory, diversity of life on earth, history of life on earth, and ecology. Dissection of preserved animals is required. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Offered Spring.

BI 122 Concepts in Biology 4 Cr.

A lab science course exclusively for non-science majors that aims to give students an appreciation of the major concepts and current topics in biology. Concepts include cell structures, photosynethesis, cellular respiration, genetics and ecology as well as human anatomy and physiology. Current topics may include stem cell research, nutrition, diseases, steroid abuse, traumatic brain injury, global climate change, and other pertinent issues. Credit may not be earned for both BI 101 and BI 122. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Offered Spring. Goal 4.

BI 1XL Biology Lab Transfer Elective 4 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exits.

BI 1XX Biology Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

BI 203 Introduction to Scientific Method & Bioscientific Terminology 1 Cr.

An introduction to the philosophy of science, the scientific method and bioscientific terminology including an analysis of data and interpretation of scientific and science-related popular press articles. Includes exposure to various forms of scientific communication. Prepares students majoring in the biological sciences. 1 lecture hour. Prereq: F1 Biology major. Offered Spring.

BI 205 Ecology 4 Cr.

The interrelationships between living organisms and their total environment are studied. Major concepts include evolution, ecosystem structure and function, community development, species diversity, succession, interspecific and intraspecific relationships, competition, predation, behavior, population growth and regulation. Collection and preservation of plants and animals may be required. 3 lecture hours, 3 lab/fieldwork hours. Prereq: BI 102. Offered Fall.

BI 215 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 Cr.

The first half of a two-semester course exploring human anatomy and physiology. Cellular metabolism, tissues, and the skeletal, muscle, integumentary, and nervous body systems are discussed. Dissection of preserved animals is required. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Offered Fall and Summer.

BI 216 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 Cr.

The second half of a two-semester course exploring human anatomy and physiology. The endocrine, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, lymphatic (including the immune response), urinary, and reproductive body systems are discussed. Dissection of preserved animals is required. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory 2 hours. Prereq: BI 215 or permission of the instructor. Offered Spring and Summer.

BI 220 Introductory Microbiology 4 Cr.

A survey of microbiology with emphasis on microorganisms of medical significance. Fundamentals of microbial structure, physiology and control are considered along with the role of pathogenic organisms in the infectious and disease processes. Laboratory exercises are designed to provide facility in visualizing, staining, culturing, enumerating, isolating, maintaining, and identifying microorganisms. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Offered Spring.

BI 226 Cell Biology 4 Cr.

A molecular level examination of the ultrastructure and function of the cytoplasm, intracellular components, cell membrane, extracellular structures and formation, and excretion of extracellular products. Recent molecular biology developments are stressed, including the implications for the biotechnology industry. The laboratory component includes state-of-the-art procedures and emphasizes hands-on experimental techniques. May require dissection of living animals. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereqs: BI 102 and CH 104. Offered Spring.

BI 253 Foods and Nutrition 4 Cr.

Provides a background in organizational structure and activities that emphasize the physiological basis of nutrition with an analysis of nutritional needs at various age levels. Consideration given to the relationship of nutrition to health and fitness, principles of food selection, metabolism of nutrients, vitamins and minerals, energy balance and obesity, food safety and technology. 3 lecture hours, 2 lab/fieldwork hours. Prereq: BI 101. Offered Spring.

BI 2XL Biology Lab Elective 4 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

BI 2XX Biology Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

BI 302 Embryology 4 Cr.

A study of the fundamental principles of development through the establishment of the major organs and systems, exemplified in the laboratory by study of representative embryonic forms. May require dissection of living and preserved animals. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Offered Spring even years.

BI 303 Genetics 4 Cr.

The physical and chemical basis of inheritance, expression, and interaction of the hereditary units, linkage, and variation. The application of Mendelian principles to plants and animals. Consideration is also given to microbial and viral genetics, genetic engineering, and related topics. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Prereq: BI 102. Offered Fall.

BI 304 Physiology 4 Cr.

A study of the physiologic systems of humans and homeostatic feedback mechanisms that regulate the internal environment. Physical and chemical principles, cell physiology, with emphasis on homeostatic mechanisms and the study of functions of organ systems. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Prereqs: BI 102 and CH 104. Offered Fall even years.

BI 305 Biomedical Techniques 4 Cr.

Students are familiarized with the theories and applications of the new technologies that pervade the fields of biotechnology and molecular biology. Laboratory exercises illustrate key concepts and provide hands-on experience in the use of instrumentation essential to molecular biologists. 2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours. Prereqs: BI 101, BI 102 or BI 215, BI 216, and CH 103, CH 104. Offered Occasionally.

BI 316 Plant Taxonomy 4 Cr.

A general survey of the taxonomy and evolution of vascular plants, emphasizing herbaceous plants. Recognition of plant families, identification of species, and principles of collecting and preserving are stressed. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereq: BI 102 or permission of instructor. Offered Fall even years.

BI 326 Natural History of the Vertebrates 4 Cr.

A study of the classification, identification, and ecology of the vertebrates with special emphasis on the local fauna including collection and preservation of organisms. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereq: BI 102. Offered Fall odd years.

BI 330 Immunology 4 Cr.

A course presenting the basic principles of immunology, including antigen-antibody characteristics, the role of the immune system in defense and disease, and the application of fundamental concepts in the development of new technologies and immunodiagnosis. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereqs: BI 102 or BI 216, and 1 year of college chemistry. Offered Spring odd years.

BI 341 Plant Anatomy 4 Cr.

The anatomy of vascular plants analyzed from an evolutionary viewpoint are discussed including cell structure, tissues, their distribution in roots, stems, leaves and reproductive organs, and plant development. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereq: BI 102 or permission of instructor. Offered Spring odd years.

BI 351 Dendrology and Silvics 4 Cr.

An introduction to major woody plant species in the Northeast, including taxonomic characteristics, life histories, habitat requirements, and economic importance. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory/fieldwork hours. Prereq: BI 102 or permission of instructor. Offered Fall odd years.

BI 364 Pathophysiology in Sports Medicine 4 Cr.

The study of human pathology with primary emphasis on the pathogenesis of those pathological states most commonly encountered in sports medicine, their disruption of normal physiology and the body's mechanism for restoring the steady state (homeostasis) are discussed in this course. The biology of the disease process is examined at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ and organ system level. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Prereqs: BI 215 (C) & BI 216 (C) or permission of instructor. Offered Spring even years.

BI 370 Introduction to Neuroscience 4 Cr.

An interdisciplinary course introducing the structure and function of the mammalian nervous system. Topics include, neuronal development, sensory and motor systems, chemical control of the brain and behavior, and the underlying mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease. May require dissection of living animals. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Prereqs: BI 101 and either BI 215 or PY 230. Offered Fall.

BI 395 Evolution 4 Cr.

This course introduces Darwinian and Non-Darwinian mechanisms of evolutionary change, a history of life in the context of contemporary biology, and scientific and cultural controversies surrounding this topic. 4 lecture hours. Prereqs: BI 102 and BI 303.

BI 399 Pilot Course in Biology at the Upper-Level 4 Cr.

Pilot course in biology at the upper level.

BI 3XL Biology Lab Transfer Elective 4 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

BI 3XX Biology Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

BI 401 Senior Seminar 3 Cr.

The capstone course integrating reading, writing, speaking and critical thinking skills. It includes instruction in scientific writing, use of contemporary scientific biological literature, and library research techniques. Students prepare research papers on current topics using primary sources and give oral presentations to the department faculty. 3 lecture hours. Prereqs: J2, S1 or S2 or permission of the instructor. Offered Fall.

BI 415 Neuroanatomy 4 Cr.

The anatomy of the brain and nervous system, with an emphasis on human neuroanatomy is discussed in this course including gross and microscopic anatomy, with in depth treatments of physical and functional organization, and major neural pathways. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Prereq: BI 370. Offered Fall odd years.

BI 420 Diseases of the Nervous System 4 Cr.

An in-depth study of the biological basis of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Topics include developmental disorders, impairments of higher function, and the underlying mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease. Drug development and other therapeutic treatment strategies are discussed. 4 lecture hours. Prereq: BI 370. Offered Spring even years.

BI 424 Woodland Ecology and Management 4 Cr.

A review of biotic and abiotic factors controlling the forest environment, methods for determining vegetation structure and succession, introduction to major forest associations in the Northeast, and consequences of various harvesting and management techniques. 3 lecture hours, 3 field hours. Prereqs: BI 351 or BI 316, or permission of instructor. Offered Spring even years.

BI 426 Ecological Parasitology 4 Cr.

A broad overview of major groups of eukaryotic parasites with an emphasis on internal parasites important to human and veterinary health. In addition to covering the basic morphological and phylogenetic details of each group, focus is on how these parasites interact with and affect each other and their hosts. 3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours. Pre-reqs: BI 205. Offered: Fall even years.

BI 440 Reading and Research 3,4 Cr.

Independent study. BI 440 may be taken no more than twice, for 7 maximum credits. An approved topic, a brief outline of the research to be conducted, and a signature from a biology mentor are submitted to the department chair prior to the seventh day of the term in which enrolled. Prereqs: J2, S1, S2 Biology majors, 3.0 cum. GPA in biology courses, or department approval.

BI 450 Internship in Biology 3-7 Cr.

Internship in Biology. Seven maximum credits are allowed.

BI 4XX BI Advance Transfer Course 4 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

Chemistry Courses

CH 100 Introduction to Forensic Science 4 Cr.

An introductory survey course designed for non-science/engineering majors that focuses on scientific principles behind the recognition, collection, preservation, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence found at a crime scene. Emphasis is on understanding the capabilities and limitations of forensic science as it is currently practiced. 3 Lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Offered Fall and Spring. Goal 4.

CH 101 Introduction to General Chemistry 4 Cr.

The first of a two-semester course series covering topics in General, Organic and Biochemistry (GOB). This fundamental course introduces the principles of chemical structure and reactivity. Topics include accuracy and precision in measurement, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding and reactions, and chemical equilibrium. The laboratory complements the lecture material with emphasis placed on collaborative problem solving. 3 Lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereq: Math placement score of 001 or higher. Not more than one of CH 101 or CH 103 may count as degree credit. Offered Spring. Goal 4.

CH 102 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry 4 Cr.

The second part of a two-semester course series covering topics in General, Organic and Biochemistry (GOB). This course introduces the nomenclature, structure and reactivity of organic compounds and the structure and function of the major classes of biological compounds and their role in metabolic pathways. Laboratory exercises complement the lecture material. Prereqs: CH 101 or CH 103. No more than one of CH 102 or CH 104 may count as degree credit. CH 102 may not be taken for credit after successful completion of CH 205. 3 Lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Offered Fall. Goal 4.

CH 103 General Chemistry I 4 Cr.

Introduction to chemical characteristics and behavior, stressing atomic structure, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium and kinetics, and descriptive chemistry of important elements. Laboratory includes qualitative and quantitative exercises, and syntheses. Credit will not be granted for more than one of the following sequences: CH 103 - CH 104, CH 101 - CH 102, or CH 103 - CH 102. 3 Lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereq: One year of high school chemistry and a Math placement score of 2 or higher or a “C” or higher in MA 095. Offered Fall. Goal 4.

CH 104 General Chemistry II 4 Cr.

Continuation of the study of chemical characteristics and behavior, stressing atomic structure, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium and kinetics, and descriptive chemistry of important elements. Laboratory includes qualitative and quantitative exercises, and syntheses. Credit will not be granted for more than one of the following sequences: CH 103 - CH 104, CH 101 - CH 102, or CH 103 - CH 102. 3 Lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereq: CH 103. Offered Spring. Goal 4.

CH 1XL Chemistry Lab Transfer Elective 4 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

CH 1XX Chemistry Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

CH 204 Quantitative Analysis 4 Cr.

A course on the general principles and laboratory practices of quantitative analysis, applied principally in colorimetric and volumetric determinations. Studies include theory and practical procedures associated with gravimetric analysis, potentiometric titrations, and use of pH-meters. 3 Lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours. Prereqs: CH 103, CH 104. Offered Fall even years.

CH 205 Survey of Organic Chemistry 4 Cr.

An introduction to the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds and the instrumentation of organic chemistry. Laboratory work involves manipulation of organic laboratory equipment, preparation and identification of typical organic compounds, and the characteristics of the major functional groups. 3 Lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. Prereq: CH 104. Offered Spring even years. 201910.

CH 214 Communication in Chemistry 1 Cr.

Illustrates the organization of the chemical literature, the efficient search of the literature and a formal introduction to scientific writing. 1 Lecture hour. Offered Fall.

CH 225 Organic Chemistry I 4 Cr.

An introduction to the study of carbon compounds; preparation and identification of typical compounds. 3 Lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereq: CH 104. Offered Fall.

CH 226 Organic Chemistry II 4 Cr.

A continuation of the study of carbon compounds; preparation and identification of typical compounds. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereq: CH 225. Offered Spring.

CH 2XX Chemistry Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

CH 314 Instrumental Methods 3 Cr.

A course on the theory of modern instrumental methods. 3 Lecture hours. Prereq: CH 204. Offered Spring odd years.

CH 315 Analysis Laboratory 1 Cr.

An upper class laboratory experience in chemical methods of measurement and analysis. 3 Laboratory hours. Prereq: CH 204. Offered Spring odd years.

CH 324 Biochemistry I 4 Cr.

A course on the chemical phenomena and energy effects in life processes. Topics include structure and function of biomolecules, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), photosynthesis and recombinant DNA technologies. 3 Lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereqs: BI 101, CH 226. Offered Fall.

CH 325 Biochemistry II 4 Cr.

A continuation of the study of the chemical phenomena and energy effects in life processes. Topics include structure and function of biomolecules, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), photosynthesis and recombinant DNA technologies. 3 Lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. Prereq: CH 324. Offered Spring even years.

CH 327 Physical Chemistry I 3 Cr.

The physical properties, structure and transformation of matter are studied with emphasis on applications of thermodynamics, equilibrium, phase equilibria and reaction kinetics. 3 Lecture hours. Prereqs: CH 104; MA 122. Recommended: PS 201/202 or PS 211/212. Offered Fall even years.

CH 328 Physical Chemistry II 3 Cr.

A continuation of the study of physical properties and structure of matter with emphasis on the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, molecular and electronic spectroscopy and molecular thermodynamics. 3 Lecture hours. Prereq: CH 327. Offered Spring odd years.

CH 337 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 1 Cr.

Laboratory investigations with formal laboratory reports into the physical properties and chemical behavior of substances. 3 Laboratory hours. Pre/Co-req: CH 327. Offered Fall even years.

CH 338 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II 1 Cr.

A continuation of laboratory investigations with formal laboratory reports on the physical properties and chemical behavior of substances. 3 Laboratory hours. Pre/Co-req: CH 328. Offered Spring odd years.

CH 413 Chemistry Seminar 1 Cr.

Part of a capstone experience providing individual assignments, written reports, oral reports, and class discussions on chemical topics of current interest. Reading, writing, speaking and critical thinking skills are emphasized. 1 Lecture hour. Restriction: J2 Chemistry and Biochemistry majors.

CH 421 Chemical Synthesis and Examination I 3 Cr.

A capstone experience in which organic, inorganic and compounds of biological interest are synthesized and examined with respect to purity and properties. Students develop an integrated perspective on the general field of chemistry and develop proficiency in practical laboratory procedures and in reporting results. 8 Laboratory hours. Restriction: J2 Chemistry and Biochemistry majors. Offered Fall.

CH 422 Chemical Synthesis and Examination II 3 Cr.

The second part of a capstone experience in which organic, inorganic and compounds of biological interest are synthesized and examined with respect to purity and properties. Students develop an integrated perspective on the general field of chemistry and develop proficiency in practical laboratory procedures and in reporting results. 8 Laboratory hours. Restriction: Sr. 1 Chemistry and Biochemistry majors. Offered Spring.

CH 425 Thesis 1-3 Cr.

This course allows the student to conduct research on a project approved by the faculty of the chemistry and biochemistry programs. The student can be expected to perform the necessary experiments, organize and interpret the data and to communicate the results of the project with a comprehensive report. Prerequisites: CH 226 and permission of the department. The student may re-enroll in CH 425 for up to 6 credits.

CH 438 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 Cr.

A course on the chemistry of the elements: properties, characteristics, and behavior. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisites: CH 327 - CH 328. Offered spring semesters of even numbered years.

CH 439 Advanced Organic Chemistry 3 Cr.

An advanced and thorough development of topics introduced in CH 226. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisites: CH 226. Offered on occasion.

CH 450 Topics in Chemistry 3 Cr.

A course in which a limited topic in advanced chemistry is covered in depth. Prereq: permission of the instructor. Offered on occasion.

Physical Education Courses

PE 107 Foundations of Physical Education 3 Cr.

A course designed to provide students with an introduction to the professional aspects of the physical education profession. Includes historical and philosophical implications with emphasis on modern trends in program design. Acquaints students with professional organizations and reviews career possibilities in the field.

PE 163 Scientific Foundations of Health and Wellness 3 Cr.

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the effects physical activity and fitness have on health and wellness, at the individual and community level. Additionally, exercise prescription for health and fitness and the principal of performance exercise prescription are covered. Consideration will be given to the nature of communicable diseases and preventative measures used individually, in schools and community. This course is offered in the fall and spring.

PE 1XX Physical Education Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

PE 223 Motor Skills Development I 3 Cr.

This course teaches students to apply principles of best practice to the development and delivery of appropriate instructional programs in individual and elementary activities currently being taught in the public schools (e.g. dance, throwing, catching, kicking, and gymnastics). Strong consideration is given to the development of personal performance and skill acquisition in order to more effectively lead practical lessons in school. Students must demonstrate an understanding of, and competence in motor skill acquisition. Offered fall semester. 4 hour lab.

PE 224 Motor Skills Development II 3 Cr.

This course teaches students to apply principles of best practice to the development and delivery of appropriate instructional programs in team, dual, and secondary activities currently being taught in the public schools (e.g. basketball, volleyball, soccer, racquet sports) as well as non-traditional activities (e.g. Indiaka, Takraw, pateka, tchoukball). Consideration is given to the development of personal performance and skill acquisition in order to effectively lead practical lessons in school. Students must demonstrate an understanding of, and competence in motor skill acquisition and physical education pedagogy in the context of public school instruction programs. Offered spring semester. 4 hour lab.

PE 245 Assessment in PE & Sports 3 Cr.

Introduction to construction, evaluation, and interpretation of assessments utilized in K-12 Health and Physical Education. Emphasis is placed on standards-based assessments and analysis of data to inform instruction.

PE 261 Foundations in Health Education 4 Cr.

This course will teach historical development, professional standards, philosophy and program planning, including current best practices in the development, implementation and evaluation of health education programs. It will focus on developing personal and social health skills, including decision making, interpersonal communication, goal setting and self managment skills. In addition, this course will integrate teaching students media literacy, personal advocacy, and how to access valid health information, products and services and how to teach this to prospective students. Lecture 3 hours: Field Experience 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE 260. Offered even-numbered fall semesters.

PE 265 Lifelong Motor Development 3 Cr.

This course studies the sequential, continuous age-related process whereby movement behavior changes. The class will cover information processing theories, theories of motor learning, effects of practice regimens and feedback and biological changes experienced over a lifetime, which affect motor skill acquisition. Understanding lifespan motor development is important for educators at all levels, special education teachers, physical educators, coaches, and adult fitness leaders.

PE 271 Outdoor Physical Education I 3 Cr.

This course provides students with a comprehensive background in warm weather Outdoor Physical Education. Skills in trip planning, risk management, equipment selection concerning use and care, and group leadership techniques will be covered. This class will prepare students to recognize the assumption of risk, attractive nuisances, negligence, and the standard of care when facilitating an Outdoor Physical Education program. Students will study and practice principles and protocols for administering safe, high-quality outdoor education experiences in canoeing and kayaking, mountain biking, hiking & backpacking, adventure, etc. Also covered will be topics in animal and wilderness conservation, nutrition, compass use and navigation, and environmental ethics. 3 lecture hours, 3 field experience hours. Pre-req: PE 107, PE 163, or permission of instructor. Offered: fall.

PE 272 Outdoor Physical Education II 3 Cr.

This course provides students with a comprehensive background in cold weather Outdoor Physical Education. Students will be actively engaged in winter activities. This class will prepare students to conduct classes in outdoor education during the winter, covering snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, ice skating, etc. Also presented will be, but not limited to, topics in animal and wilderness conservation, nutrition, mountain and cold weather illness and injuries, and snow science, such as avalanche assessment and ice assessment. An emphasis will be placed on preparing individuals to be active in cold weather under winter conditions. 3 lecture hours, 3 field experience hours. Pre-req: PE 107, PE 161, or permission by instructor. Offered: spring.

PE 2XX Physical Education Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

PE 333 Management Sports Facilities 3 Cr.

This course is designed to help prepare students for careers associated with sport facility management. A detailed examination of facility utilization, including safety and security, scheduling, maintenance, and emergencies and emergency response will be applied to a variety of facilities. Additionally the administration of a facility with special attention to preventative supervision, risk management, facility assessment and design, project planning, and staffing will be examined. Facilities covered will include but not be limited to parks, recreation centers, gymnasiums, aquatic facilities, fitness centers, sports arenas, tennis courts, and golf courses. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisites: PE 107 or PE 161. Offered even year fall semesters.

PE 341 Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Elementary School 4 Cr.

A course that provides classroom and laboratory experience designed to acquaint the student with basic materials, methods, and principles necessary to meet the educational needs of the elementary school child. Emphasis on curriculum development with consideration given to concepts of movement education and perceptual motor development. Application of movement theory to specific sports skills and activities. Health information protection and student privacy issues are included throughout the course of instruction. Classroom 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours on site at Barre Town Middle, Elementary School.

PE 342 Instructional Strategies for Physical Education in Middle-Secondary School 4 Cr.

A course that places emphasis on ethics, principles, procedures, and techniques related to teaching health and physical education in the elementary and secondary schools. Methods of organization, types of programs, and content and materials of health and physical education courses. Laboratory experience provided in traditional and new media, self and peer evaluation, and micro teaching. Health information protection and student privacy issues are reinforced throughout this course. Classroom 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours on site at U-32 Jr. - Sr. High School.

PE 355 Coaching:Leadership in Sports 3 Cr.

A course with a strong focus on the philosophy, ethics, principles, and techniques of coaching individual and team sports. Identifying and addressing the ethical dilemmas pervading our sport organizations today will be emphasized. This course provides an emphasis on the organization of interscholastic athletics in relation to the achievement of education objectives, and satisfies the university’s General Education Ethics requirement. In addition, students will be prepared for the National Federation of State High School coaching certification. 3 lecture hours.

PE 365 Kinesiology 4 Cr.

A review of the structure and function of the skeletal and muscular systems with special emphasis on an analysis of human motion as related to human performance. Classroom 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: BI 215 (C), BI 216 (C), or permission of the instructor.

PE 371 Physiology of Exercise 4 Cr.

A review of physiological principles of muscular activity with emphasis on the integration of body systems in the performance of exercise and various athletic activities. Classroom 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: BI 215 (C), BI 216 (C), or permission of the instructor.

PE 375 Adapted Physical Activity 3 Cr.

A study and overview of activities and programs focused on meeting the needs of special populations. Topics include cognitive, neuromuscular, sensory, and othopedic impairments. Consideration will be given to teaching methodology, including, design and implementation of physical activity programs for individuals with disabilites. This course includes off-campus activities. Prerequisites: PE 341. Offered spring semester.

PE 406 Readings in Physical Education 3 Cr.

This course examines the current literature on issues facing future professional educators of an ethical, legal or pedagogical nature. Students are expected to think, read, write and speak critically about these professional issues in the physical education discipline. The submission of a professional portfolio is required. Seminar 3 hours.

PE 426 Internship 6,12 Cr.

A course designed to provide the Physical Education students with an intern-type experience in a professional setting appropriate to their career goals. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of all courses in the major through the sixth semester. Cross listed as PE/SM. A student may not receive credit for both.

PE 432 Organization and Administration in Physical Education 3 Cr.

A course that emphasizes the study of administrative principles, functional organization, and supervision in relation to the total physical education program in grades K-12 and to managing sports facilities and sports programs. Major topics include personnel, curriculum, legal liability, intramurals, evaluation, budgeting and risk management.

PE 441 Advanced Exercise Physiology and Prescription 4 Cr.

This course prepares and qualifies students to work as personal trainers and fitness specialists in corporate fitness and health club facilities. The course bridges the gap between exercise physiology and the practical application skills of personal training. Advanced exercise physiology knowledge is presented to assure new knowledge and exercise techniques are acquired. Students will learn how to design and implement exercise prescriptions for multiple populations and as well as successful goal attainment. Students will be prepared to sit for certification examinations. Three lecture hours per week and two hour laboratory component. Prerequisites: PE 365, PE 371, or permission of instructor. Offered Fall semesters.

PE 450 Exercise Testing and Electrocardiography 4 Cr.

This course focuses on the theory and methods of administering exercise stress tests using different modes of exercise and consideration of different populations. Further analysis of information gained from exercise testing, studying deviations from normal, and applications of exercise test information in adult fitness and cardiac rehabilitation programs will be highlighted. Emphasis will be placed on the recognition and interpretation of normal and abnormal resting and exercise ECG monitoring. Three lecture hours per week and two hour laboratory component. Prerequisites: BI 215, BI 216 and PE 371 or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester.