Entrepreneurship

The Entrepreneurship Minor is a multidisciplinary opportunity for students to expand their knowledge and experience. Entrepreneurship, fundamentally, is about innovation. It is about recognizing opportunities and acting on them.

Entrepreneurs are agents of change. Being entrepreneurial requires the ability to think creatively, innovate, and lead the development of an idea to implementation

Goals:

The Entrepreneurship minor provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to undertake the process of starting a new business venture. This minor is not just for students interested in creating a new business; rather it is a broad exploration of how to be entrepreneurial, whether by starting a new business, or within an existing business or organization.

Outcomes:

Students who satisfy the requirements for the minor demonstrate:

  • an ability to evaluate a product or service to meet the desired needs of markets within realistic constraints such as financial, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability;
  • an understanding of how to start an entrepreneurial business;
  • an ability to convince others about the merits of a new idea;
  • an ability to practice techniques to effectively manage and motivate people;
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of product- and service-based solutions in a contemporary global, economic, environmental, and societal context;
  • knowledge of legal and tax implications associated with their decisions;
  • an ability to think and act innovatively;
  • knowledge of design thinking and other tools that every innovative organization needs to succeed
     
Careers for this Minor:
  • Mid-level management
  • Business consultant
  • Sales
  • Research and development
  • Not-for-profit fundraiser
  • Teacher
  • Recruiter
  • Business reporter

Entrepreneurship Minor Curriculum Map 2018-2019 Catalog

Overview of the Entrepreneurial Landscape3
Principles of Entrepreneurship3
Convincing Others of the Merits New Ideas. (choose one course from below)3
Interpersonal Communications3
Public Speaking3
Marketing Management3
Consumer Behavior3
Integrated Marketing Communications3
Interacting with Employees within an Organization. (choose one course from below; MG majors cannot choose a MG course)3
Human Issues in Design3
The Literature of Leadership3
Management of Organizations3
Organizational Behavior3
Human Resources Management3
Nursing Leadership3
Economic Factors & Trends Influencing Current & Future Profitability. (choose one course from below)3
Principles of Economics (Macro)3
Principles of Economics (Micro)3
Money and Banking3
International Economics3
International Dimensions of Business3
Legal & Tax Implications (choose one course from below)3
Introduction to Accounting and Financial World3
Business Law I3
Business Law II3
Incorporating Innovation in Work & Teams. 3
AP 431Design Thinking and Innovation3
or EG 400 Design Thinking and Innovation
Total Cr.18

Architecture Courses

AP 106 Architectural Drafting 3 Cr.

Techniques of architectural drafting are introduced as basic skills used to describe architectural form. The various graphic tools, techniques, and conventions are presented and the rationale behind their use is explained. In addition to the basic graphic constructions and multi-view projections, the methods of developing architectural plans, elevations, and sections are addressed. This course is primarily intended for students who have had little or no prior introduction to mechanical and architectural drafting. One hour of lecture and three 3-hours of studio per week. 1 lecture hour and 3 studio hours.

AP 111 Fundamentals of Architecture 4 Cr.

An introduction to the basic principles and skills that constitute the discipline of architecture. A series of two and three dimensional graphic exercises is used to cultivate an understanding of architectonics, the intentional arrangement of space and enclosure to communicate human values while also introducing graphic techniques for communicating concepts and solutions. One hour of lecture and three 9-hour studios per week.

AP 118 Fundamentals of Architecture II 4 Cr.

A continuation of the introduction to the fundamental processes and technologies that constitute the discipline of architecture. This course investigates the design process, explores interactive computer graphics (CAD) as a design tool, and culminates with the application of these principles, processes, and skills to an architectural design problem. One hour of lecture and 9 hours of studio per week. Prerequisite: AP 111.

AP 211 Architectural Design I 5 Cr.

The first in a sequence of design studio courses introducing the processes, judgment, and communications involved in the synthesis of architectural form. Through a focused series of individual and group projects, the influences of the human and physical contexts on form are explored. One hour of lecture and three 4-hour studios per week. Prerequisite: AP 118. 1 lecture hour and 12 studio hours.

AP 212 Architectural Design II 5 Cr.

Second in a sequence of design studio courses emphasizing the processes, judgment, and communications involved in the synthesis of architectural form. Through a focused series of individual and/or group projects, the influences of functional requirements on form are explored. One hour of lecture and three 4-hour studios per week. Prerequisite: AP 211. 1 lecture hour and 0 to 12 studio hours.

AP 221 Site Development and Design 3 Cr.

A course that deals with engineering principles and design considerations involved with site design. Earth shaping, drainage, roadway alignment, parking lot layouts, code requirements and environmental factors are studied prior to and after design changes. Two hours of lecture and one 2-hour studio per week. 2 lecture hours and 2 studio hours.

AP 222 Human Issues in Design 3 Cr.

An introduction to the psychological, sociological, and physical factors that influence the design of architectural space. The fields of anthropometrics, ergonomics, and proxemics are addressed, as well as considerations for barrier-free environments. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. 3 lecture hours.

AP 225 Introduction to Passive Environmental Systems 3 Cr.

Through coordinated lectures and demonstrations, the impacts of environmental energies on architectural form are introduced and explored. Emphasis is given to the processes by which the architect orders light, climate, gravity, and sound responses to achieve building geometry. The course also addresses concepts and strategies for responding to environmental hazards, and designing healthy buildings and green architecture. Three hours of lecture. Prerequisite: AP 118, EG 110 or instructor's permission. 3 lecture hours.

AP 241 Architectural Delineation 3 Cr.

A studio course in advanced graphic methods. Various rendering techniques, definitive design development, and the principles of construction drawings and architectural detailing are presented and explored through individual projects. One hour of lecture and two 2-hour studios per week. 1 lecture hour and 4 studio hours.

AP 311 Architectural Design III 5 Cr.

The development of the comprehensive building process as a synthesis of spatial, functional, and contextual concerns with emphases on building systems and materials. Individual and group problems are of a limited and defined scope. One hour of lecture and three 4-hour studios per week. Prerequisites: AP 212 and AP 325. Corequisites: AP 327.

AP 312 Architectural Design IV 5 Cr.

This fourth course in the design studio sequence continues the development of a comprehensive building design process with problems of complex but limited scope. The synthesis of spatial, functional, and contextual concerns, as directly linked to the understanding and employment of building systems, continues to provide a framework. One 1-hour lecture and three 4-hour studios per week. Prerequisite: AP 311. 1 lecture hour and 12 studio hours.

AP 325 Materials, Construction, and Design 3 Cr.

An introduction to the processes by which construction materials and systems are evaluated, selected, incorporated, and detailed in building design. Both measurable and immeasurable design responses to environmental energies are explored in soils, concrete, masonry, wood, and metals. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: AP 225. 3 lecture hours.

AP 327 Active Building Systems I 3 Cr.

A survey of contemporary mechanical building equipment and systems, including heating, ventilation and air conditioning. Emphasis is placed on comparisons of design parameters, interfaces, and impacts on overall building form. Energy efficiency is addressed. Prerequisites: AP 225 and MA 107. 3 lecture hours.

AP 328 Active Building Systems II 3 Cr.

A continuation of AP 327, surveying contemporary electrical, lighting, and plumbing equipment and systems. Emphasis is placed on comparisons of design parameters, interfaces, and impacts on overall building form. Energy efficiency and building codes are addressed. Prerequisite: AP 327. 3 lecture hours.

AP 403 Architectural Seminar in History and Theory 3 Cr.

As both an art and a science, the profession of architecture is continually undergoing change and reassessment. This elective seminar focuses on one or more specific issues and topics regarding the historic and philosophical contexts that influence architecture today. Typically these topics range from the study of specific historic periods or schools of thought regarding design to the diverse trends in current architectural thinking. AP 504 shall require a graduate-level paper or project. This course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. 3 lecture hours.

AP 406 Architectural Theory 3 Cr.

AP 411 Architectural Design V 5 Cr.

Comprehensive problem-oriented design studio offered to fourth year students by various faculty members. The extension of the comprehensive design proves to include problems of an expanded scope and large scale, including building complexes and urban design. Individual and group problems emphasize the complex relationships of environmental factors, human concerns, and architectural form. This studio is considered the undergraduate capstone course in the undergraduate portion of the Architecture Program. A design portfolio, covering all seven semesters of studio work and including a written paper, is required to be submitted at the completion of this course. Prerequisite: AP 312. 1 lecture hour and 12 studio hours.

AP 412 Architectural Design VI 5 Cr.

Elective problem-oriented studios offered to fourth year students by various faculty members. The extension of the comprehensive design process to include problems of expanded scope and large scale, including building complexes and urban design. Individual and group problems emphasize the complex interrelationships of environmental factors, human concerns, and architectural form. One hour of lecture and three 4-hour studios per week. Prerequisite: AP 312. 1 lecture hour and 12 studio hours.

AP 414 Architectural Seminar In Design 3 Cr.

This elective seminar investigates in a non-studio setting one or more specific concepts, issues, or topics related to architectural design and its associated disciplines, such as urban, landscape, interior, and visual design. AP 514 shall require a graduate level paper or project. This course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisite: approval of instructor. Cross listed with AP 520.

AP 424 Architectural Seminar in Technology 3 Cr.

As both an art and science, the profession of architecture is continually undergoing change and reassessment. This elective seminar focuses on one or more of the specific issues, topics, or skills related to technologies in architecture today. Typically, these specific semester topics range from advanced materials and construction systems to energy-conserving design; from environmental issues to hands-on building experiences. AP520 shall require a graduate-level paper or project. This course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisites: AP 114, AP 325, or approval of instructor. Cross listed with AP 520.

AP 431 Design Thinking and Innovation 3 Cr.

This course explores the experience and practice of innovation by examining creativity as the ability to turn ideas into action. It examines the development, management, evolution, and broad context of emerging technologies and associated ventures. Students will complete innovation challenges from start to finish and leave with an understanding of the key tenets of design thinking and a sense for ways they can incorporate them into their work. This ‘hands-on’, project-based course involves students in the design and development of ‘visual brand languages’ for emerging technologies, foundation exercises in creativity, and case studies based on pivotal products from the past 50 years. Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen students.

AP 434 Architectural Seminar in Process 3 Cr.

As both an art and science, the profession of architecture is continually undergoing change and reassessment. This elective seminar focuses on one or more specific topics regarding the current and future practice of architecture: what architects do, and how they do it. Typically, these topics range from design techniques to office management and from specialties within the practice, to the legal environmental, and social forces that influence it. AP 534 seminar shall require a graduate-level paper or project. This course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisite: instructor's approval. Cross listed with AP 534.

AP 436 Project Delivery and Documentation 4 Cr.

Relationships between the formal methods of project delivery and the architectural office form the basic investigation of this course. The project delivery process and the methods of communication and the documentation involved provide a detail study of typical office procedures. The studio component of this course provides practical experience of the typical project delivery process. Documentation is approached as the fundamental means of architectural communication. This communication is multi-layered acting as a foundation for the means of production of contemporary architecture. Various tools will be utilized ranging from computer aided design to conceptual organization schema in both the practice of typical architectural project delivery and the development of new means of communication and production. Two hours of lecture and four hours of studio per week.

AP 455 Special Projects in Architecture 1-3 Cr.

An execution of a singular project related to architectural design, history/theory, process, or technology selected by the individual student. The course focuses on in-depth independent research, development, and a formal written and/or graphic presentation of an architecturally-related topic not otherwise covered in course offerings. The student must secure a faculty member who will agree to serve as advisor/evaluator for the project. Limited to Architecture majors who have completed at least the first two years of the curriculum. Hours and credits to be arranged. 1 to 3 lecture hours.

AP 456 Senior Project 4 Cr.

AP 501 Architectural Theory 3 Cr.

A course that introduces the deeper, often implicit and hidden motivations that influence the making of architecture. Basic human values and beliefs leading to classic philosophies and aesthetics are explored. Major historic and contemporary propositions on architecture are surveyed. AP 501 requires a graduate-level paper or project. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisite: FA 202.

AP 504 Architectural Seminar in History and Theory 3 Cr.

As both an art and a science, the profession of architecture is continually undergoing change and reassessment. This elective seminar focuses on one or more specific issues and topics regarding the historic and philosophical contexts that influence architecture today. Typically these topics range from the study of specific historic periods or schools of thought regarding design to the diverse trends in current architectural thinking. Requires a graduate-level paper or project. This course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisites: FA 202 and FA 308. Cross listed with AP 403.

AP 511 Architectural Studio VII 5 Cr.

Elective problem-oriented studio offered by various faculty members and/or visiting critics. Introspective problems are intended to broaden and deepen individual understanding of the processes, theories, and systems that influence the design of the built environment. Emphasis is on the thorough examination of all aspects of building. Includes the identification, program preparation, and approval of the capstone project(s) to be undertaken in AP 512 in the succeeding semester. One hour of lecture and three 4-hour studios per week. Only open to graduate students in Architecture.

AP 512 Architectural Studio VIII 5 Cr.

Elective problem-oriented studio offered by various faculty members and/or visiting critics. Introspective problems are intended to broaden and deepen individual understanding of the processes, theories, and systems that influence the design of the built environment. Emphasis is on the thorough examination of all aspects of building. Consists of a single comprehensive design project that represents a capstone experience for the 5-year design sequence. The individual program and design solution must be recorded in a bound format similar to that required for the thesis. 1 hour of lecture and 3 four-hour studios per week. Prerequisite: AP 511.

AP 514 Architectural Seminar in Design 3 Cr.

This elective seminar investigates in a non-studio setting one or more specific concepts, issues, or topics related to architectural design and its associated disciplines, such as urban, landscape, interior, and visual design. Requires a graduate level paper or project. This course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisite: approval of instructor. Cross listed with AP 414.

AP 520 Architectural Seminar in Technology 3 Cr.

As both an art and science, the profession of architecture is continually undergoing change and reassessment. This elective seminar focuses on one or more of the specific issues, topics, or skills related to technologies in architecture today. Typically, these specific semester topics range from advanced materials and construction systems to energy-conserving design; from environmental issues to hands-on building experiences. Requires a graduate-level paper or project. This course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisites: AP 114, AP 325, or approval of instructor. Cross listed with AP 424.

AP 525 Architectural Thesis Research 5 Cr.

A singular design or design-related project selected by the individual student. The course consists of independent research done at a sufficient depth to display a mastery of the process of defining an architectural problem, including the investigation and discussion of the procedural, physical, and intellectual limits of this problem. The course culminates with the publication of an architectural program and a theoretical statement as well as the generation of all contextual information and design strategies as the basis for AP 526, Architectural Thesis. Three hours of class time and meetings with thesis advisors plus six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: fifth-year standing and approval of Architecture program faculty.

AP 526 Architectural Thesis 5 Cr.

Execution of a singular design or design-related project selected by the individual student. The project is based on independent research and preliminary design work produced in AP 525 and is of sufficient depth and breadth to display a mastery of design skills and comprehensive understanding of the architectural issues related to form, process, judgment, representation, and communication. The work is done under the guidance of a thesis advisor chosen by the student. Two hours of meetings with thesis advisors plus twelve hours of studio per week. Prerequisite: AP 525 with a grade of C or higher.

AP 531 Architectural Internship 6 Cr.

This course offers an opportunity for each student enrolled in Master of Architecture Program to develop a bridge between their academic experience and professional practice. As a "bridge" the learning experience is considered to move in both directions. The internship will allow individuals to apply knowledge learned in the classroom and will also allow the opportunity for individuals to bring practical experience to bear on their graduate studies. Students are responsible to secure a position with an architectural, or an architecturally-related/construction-related, firm for a period of no less than eight weeks. This position must be approved by the course instructor. The firm must be willing to submit periodic and final evaluations of the student's performance. Email is used during the employment period for communication between the students and the instructor. Requirements for the course shall include maintaining a journal and writing a major term paper related to professional practice. Typically, this course shall be taken during the summer between the fourth and fifth years, or as otherwise approved by the division head. 8 weeks, summers. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the M. Arch. Program.

AP 533 Professional Practice 3 Cr.

Investigation into the issues related to the professional practice of architecture in contemporary American society. Topics include project management, finance and economics; business and practice management; and laws and regulations governing the profession. Three hours of lecture per week.

AP 534 Architectural Seminar in Process 3 Cr.

As both an art and science, the profession of architecture is continually undergoing change and reassessment. This elective seminar focuses on one or more specific topics regarding the current and future practice of architecture: what architects do, and how they do it. Typically, these topics range from design techniques to office management and from specialties within the practice, to the legal environmental and social forces that influence it. Requires a graduate-level paper or project. This course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisite: instructor's approval. Cross listed with AP 434.

AP 555 Special Projects in Architecture 1-3 Cr.

An execution of a singular project related to architectural design, history/theory, process or technology selected by the individual student. The course focuses on in-depth independent research, development, and a formal written and/or graphic presentation of an architecturally-related topic not otherwise covered in course offerings. The student must secure a faculty member who will agree to serve as advisor/evaluator for the project. Hours and credits to be arranged.

AP 558 Global Issues in Architecture 3 Cr.

A seminar course for fifth-year architecture majors that offers opportunity for in-depth analysis, discussion, and research into contemporary issues that impact the profession of architecture and architectural design. The course will be flexible in the terms of content so that the nature of the material has a currency relevant to the complex, changing nature of the profession. The topical choices may address global concerns such as sustainability, cultural changes, conservation and preservation, information technology, and the emerging role of the architect as a professional in the 21st century. The course structure will be more constant, reflecting the values embodied in the profession, the architecture program, and the university. Specifically, there will be a strong bridge made between pedagogy and teaching methodology; course material will be synthesized and applied in a manner that demonstrates critical thinking, teamwork, creativity and community service. Three hours of seminar per week. Open only to Master's students in Architecture.

Economics Courses

EC 106 The Structure and Operation of the World Economy 3 Cr.

This course will introduce students to the operation of the world economy. Emphasis will be on the identification and description of economic concepts such as tariffs, multinational companies, stock markets, debt, international trade balances and international banking. These concepts will be developed utilizing examples from current world economic conditions. Prerequisite: This is a freshman course-permission of instructor required for any exception.

EC 1XX Economics Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

EC 201 Principles of Economics (Macro) 3 Cr.

Description and analysis of the American economic system in terms of basic economic concepts and the determination of national income and its fluctuation. Prerequisite: one semester of college mathematics.

EC 202 Principles of Economics (Micro) 3 Cr.

Study of the behavior of individuals in making decisions on the allocation of limited resources. This course examines how these decisions and behaviors affect the markets for goods and services. Prerequisite: one semester of college mathematics.

EC 310 Money and Banking 3 Cr.

The principles and institutions of money, banking and finance as they influence the performance of the economy. The major topics covered are the nature of money, commercial banking and financial institutions, central banking, monetary theory, monetary policy, inflation and the international monetary system. Prerequisites: EC 201, EC 202 and QM 213 or permission of the instructor.

EC 403 Comparative Economic Systems 3 Cr.

The study of major economic systems. Theories of capitalism, socialism and communism and their implementation by major nations are discussed. Prerequisites: EC 201 and EC 202. Offered in the spring odd years.

EC 406 Public Finance 3 Cr.

An investigation of the effects of government expenditures and revenues on the efficiency of resource allocation and the equity of the income distribution. Topics covered include public goods, externalities, benefit-cost analysis, the structure of major taxes and expenditure and tax incidence. Prerequisites: EC 201 and EC 202. Offered Occasionally.

EC 419 International Economics 3 Cr.

International trade and the theory of comparative advantage. Special attention is given to free world trade and economic development in other countries and groupings as in the European Common Market. Prerequisites: EC 201 and EC 202. Offered in the fall odd years.

Management and Marketing Courses

MG 098 Junior Career Conference 1 Cr.

This third year seminar focuses on evolving career decisions for Business & Management majors. Guest faculty are drawn from University Board of faculty members and associates with extensive real-world business acumen. Students will experience developing skills to prepare for entering the global workplace in their chosen fields and professions. 1 lecture hour.

MG 099 Senior Career Conference 1 Cr.

This fourth year seminar focuses on evolving career decisions for Business & Management majors. Guest faculty are drawn from University Board of Fellows members and associates with extensive real-world business acumen. Students will hone and finalize skills to prepare for entering the global workplace in their chosen fields and professions. 1 lecture hour.

MG 101 Introduction to Business 3 Cr.

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the world of business. Students will learn about business organization and ownership and will survey union management relations, marketing, accounting, finance, international business, the legal environment, and the stock market. The course is designed to explore the relationship between social responsibility and profits in our free enterprise system. Prerequisite: permission of instructor required for upperclassmen.

MG 1XX Management Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

MG 224 Principles of Entrepreneurship 3 Cr.

This course provides an introduction to the creative and innovative managerial practices of successful entrepreneurship. This course reviews the significant economic and social contributions entrepreneurs provide to society, the intense lifestyle commitment, and the skills necessary for entrepreneurial success. This course provides an overview of the entrepreneurial process. Prerequisites: not open to freshmen students.

MG 230 Personal Financial Literacy 3 Cr.

Students apply theoretical knowledge to consumer-oriented issues in the financial planning of the sort which must be addressed in an attempt to achieve a chosen lifestyle. The course is intended for a general audience. No prior knowledge of accounting, economics or finance is required. Prerequisites: None. 3 lecture hours.

MG 2XX Management Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

MG 309 Management of Organizations 3 Cr.

A study of the functions of modern management: planning, organization, staffing, leading, and controlling. This study is applicable to the management of military, government, educational and non-profit, as well as business organizations. The ethical and social responsibilities of management and contemporary challenges such as the internationalization of organizations are integrated in all aspects of this course. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

MG 310 Production/Operations Management 3 Cr.

Principles and applied study of the operation of manufacturing and service organizations. Managerial tools and diagnostics, decision-making, and financial management are introduced. Problems of small, medium, and large-sized businesses are studied. Prerequisites: QM 213.

MG 314 Marketing Management 3 Cr.

This course immerses the student in the strategies and processes of marketing management - market analysis, segmentation, targeting and positioning, and the implementation and evaluation of marketing plans. When the student has completed this course they will understand how a marketing plan is developed and have the skills necessary to identify, analyze and solve marketing problems. Prerequisite: EC 202 or permission of instructor. 3 lecture hours.

MG 316 Sales Management 3 Cr.

This course explores sales from the perspective of the individual salesperson as well as that of the organization, addressing topics including sales basics, proper attitudes, planning, necessary skill sets, appearance, presentation and the importance of each. The course includes case studies, examinations, and in-class presentations in order to ensure that students are well prepared to enter the sales field. Prerequisite: MG 101 or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture hours.

MG 319 International Dimensions of Business 3 Cr.

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the basic concepts and terminology of international business, and to gain an appreciation of the differences in social, political, and economic conditions among nations and how these affect the conduct of business and trade between nations. Topics include comparative cultural, political, and economic environments, international trade theory and policy, foreign exchange and exchange rate determination, the dynamics of international business-government relationships, and corporate policy and strategy of the multinational firm. Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 202.

MG 341 Business Law I 3 Cr.

A study of the law and legal system as they affect business. Topics include the court system, constitutional law, torts, criminal law and contracts. Students will learn how morality and social responsibility are integrated into our legal system. Students must complete an ethical standards paper in an appropriate context. Prerequisite: Sophomore 1 or higher. ".

MG 346 Business Law II 3 Cr.

A continuation of the analysis of the legal dimension of business operations that was developed in Business Law I. Special emphasis will be given to the legal environment as it relates to the accounting student's professional certification. Topics include bankruptcy, commercial paper, secured transactions, agency, corporations, and partnerships. Prerequisite: MG 341 or permission of instructor.

MG 351 Organizational Behavior 3 Cr.

This course considers the individual, the nature of organizations, and the issues resulting from the dynamic relationship of people in organizations. The course addresses such topics as learning, personality, motivation, organization structure, leadership, ethics, communication, and change.

MG 360 Health Economics & Policy 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to principles of health economics and public policy in health and social welfare. Topics include support for public health, policy intervention in health determinants, the relationship between government regulation and market competition, the demand for healthcare, and the supply of services. This course will enable students to apply economic reasoning to the health-care challenges facing society. Prerequisite: One semester of college level mathematics or QM 213.

MG 3XX Management Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

MG 408 Human Resources Management 3 Cr.

The management of human resources is one of the most challenging and critical aspects of contemporary organizational functions. This course addresses such issues as the nature of the American labor force, equal employment opportunity, personnel planning and staffing, compensation, employee well-being and job security, and collective bargaining. In addressing these issues attention is given to the ethical, legal, and moral questions involved. Prerequisite: MG 309 or permission of instructor.

MG 409 Organizational Leadership 3 Cr.

This course prepares students to apply leadership principles to the roles they play as managers. Students will discover more about themselves and learn more about the connection between the individual and the organization. Other topics include organizational culture, structure, group behavior, motivation, power, politics, organizational change, and workplace conflict.

MG 411 Consumer Behavior 3 Cr.

This course is designed to help the student understand the concepts of consumer behavior that provides the basis for marketing strategies. Students will gain an understanding of how consumers make decisions regarding the purchase and use of products and services and the internal and external factors that influence this process. Prerequisite: MG 314.

MG 416 Advanced Marketing 3 Cr.

In this course students will examine the key concepts and issues in developing a marketing strategy from the perspective of the corporate and SBU decision-maker. The course will take students through the process for formulating marketing strategies under various market conditions, for developing strategic and tactical marketing action plans, and how to evaluate and control a marketing plan and budget. Students undertaking this course will be required to use knowledge gained from previous marketing subjects in completing course assignments. Prerequisite: MG 314.

MG 426 Marketing Research 3 Cr.

This course explores the process and tools for data collection and analysis used to solve marketing problems. In addition, the subject addresses when marketing research is appropriate and how to define the research problem, as well as the role of marketing research in marketing decision making. This course will provide students with practical experience in the use of computer based data analysis techniques and make students aware of the biases and limitations inherent in various research methodologies. Prerequisites: QM 213, MG 314.

MG 429 Seminar in Advanced Management I 3 Cr.

A topics course addressing managerial problems in various environments. Prerequisites: MG 309, MG 310, FN 311, and MG 314.

MG 441 Integrated Marketing Communications 3 Cr.

This course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to develop appropriate communication strategies consistent with strategic marketing principles. The role of communications in the client organization's marketing plan is emphasized. The concept of Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) for coordinating the individual communication elements of advertising, direct marketing and public relations to achieve specific marketing objectives is stressed. Prerequisite MG 314. 3 lecture hours.

MG 448 Small Business Strategies 3 Cr.

A course that integrates the functional areas of management-human resources, finance, marketing, and operations they uniquely affect the small business enterprise. Case studies and lectures develop the student?s problem solving abilities. Prerequisites: MG 309, MG 310, FN 311, and MG 314.

MG 449 Administrative Policy and Strategy 3 Cr.

A capstone course designed to integrate the students' undergraduate studies. Case studies, collaborative assignments, writing assignments and oral presentations provide opportunities to synthesize and apply the knowledge gained from courses in the management program. Prerequisites: MG 309, MG 310, FN 311, and MG 314.

MG 450 Internship in Management 3 Cr.

The internship program is designed for students who want to apply their studies by working with a business, industry, or public agency. The student will be required to work closely with a faculty supervisor to develop and implement a structured experience tailored to the career goals of the student. Prerequisites: senior standing and written consent of the department chair and internship committee. Normally only available during the summer.

MG 4XX Management Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.