Transnational Crime

Non-state actors engaged in organized and transnational crime—i.e. the corruption of government officials; trafficking in persons, drugs, and arms; money laundering; international terrorism—threaten the security of the US and key economic partners.  This minor will prepare recipients for positions in law enforcement and security agencies working to neutralize these threats.  International crimes are those violations against the law of nations for which there is universal jurisdiction, and which are typically tried by international war crimes tribunals—genocide, for example.  Transnational crimes are those which a domestic jurisdiction will prosecute when they are impacted, regardless of where they occur—terrorism, for example.  A study of these two areas will interest students from a wide variety of disciplines within the University.  

Transnational Crime Minor Curriculum Map 2017-2018 Catalog

  • Students must earn a total of 18 credits for this minor.
  • Students must earn a grade of C or higher in CJ 101 prior to declaring this minor
Required Course
CJ 318Transnational Crime 13
Choose one course from: 2
CJ 330Terrorism3
CJ 341Cyber Law and Cyber Crime3
CJ 421Comparative Criminal Justice Systems3
CJ 430Homeland Security3
Choose one course in International Relations, Economics or Accounting from:
PO 202Introduction to Comparative Politics3
PO 215International Relations3
EC 106The Structure and Operation of the World Economy3
EC 202Principles of Economics (Micro)3
AC 201Introduction to Accounting and Financial World3
Choose one course in Regional Exploration from:
HI 212Modern East Asian Civilizations3
HI 214History of the Middle East3
HI 218Survey of Sub-Sahara Africa3
HI 224Modern European History3
HI 371Nation-Building 33
SO 212Cultural Anthropology3
Choose a Modern language course 205 or higher (recommended)
Internship (3 credits - 120 hours)
CJ 405Internship 43
Total Cr.18
1

 Students must meet the CJ 101 prerequisite with a grade of C or higher to enroll in this course.

2

 Students must meet the prerequisites for each of the criminal justice courses listed.

3

 Course prerequisite, a 200 level History course with a grade of C or higher.

4

This internship elective course permits an upper-level student to participate directly in the criminal justice process by serving as an aide to agencies involved in the process.  This offering is subject to the availability of such internships. Open only to junior and senior criminal justice majors, minors and students declaring this minor. 

Criminal Justice Courses

CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 Cr.

A general survey of the principles, system, and process of criminal justice. Introduction to conceptions and definitions of crime, criminal law, and due process. Examination of the organization and operation of the three basic components of the criminal justice system -- the police, the courts, and corrections -- individually and in relationship to one another. Offered in fall semester.

CJ 102 Substantive Criminal Law 3 Cr.

This course presents the development of criminal law in the United States and discusses its principles, sources, distinctions, and limitations. The following topics are covered in detail: criminal liability; offenses against persons, property, public peace and public justice; preparatory activity crimes; and defenses available to those charged with criminal activity. Offered spring semester.

CJ 1XX Criminal Justice Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

CJ 201 Criminology 3 Cr.

This course covers the various biological, psychological, and sociological types of theory that have been offered to explain the incidence of crime in society. Various types of crime, including violent, property, corporate, political and victimless crime, methods of studying crime, and characteristics of criminals are also examined. Offered spring semester.

CJ 209 Methods of Social Science Research 4 Cr.

An examination of the methodological foundations of the social sciences; the logic and technique of empirical inquiry; the nature of social facts, the operationalization of concepts, and the construction of hypotheses; research designs including surveys, interviews, experiments, observation, and evaluation; the organization and analysis of data; graph and table construction and interpretation; the common problems of empirical social research; and research ethics. Emphasis given to criminal justice applications. The lab part of the course instructs students how to use and apply SPSS and other relevant software. Cross-listed with SO 209. Offered fall semester. Classroom and Laboratory 4 hours.

CJ 2XX Criminal Justice Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

CJ 300 Topics in Criminal Justice 3 Cr.

Selected topics offered on occasion.

CJ 301 Criminal Procedure 3 Cr.

This course addresses the legal procedure connected with arrest, search and seizure, identification and questioning, bail setting, indictments, and plea bargaining. Offered fall semester.

CJ 304 Juvenile Delinquency 3 Cr.

An examinatoin of the social and psychological dimensions of juvenile delinquency, its nature, extent, distribution, and patterns. Evaluation of theories and explanations of delinquent causation, and the investigation of delinquent subcultures. Consideration of labeling and conflict factors in the processing, prevention, and treatment of delinquents. Offered on occasion.

CJ 305 Juvenile Justice 3 Cr.

A general survey of the philosophy, system and process of juvenile justice. Examination of the social and legal control of juvenile delinquency by the police, courts and corrections, as well as by private agencies. Emphasis on the distinctions in philosophy, law, jurisdiction, organization and terminology between the juvenile justice system and the adult criminal justice system. Offered every other year.

CJ 306 Victimology 3 Cr.

An examination of the role of the victim in crime and the treatment of the victim by the criminal justice system. Instruction in the use of victimization data in determining crime rates and in developing prevention programs. Review of victim assistance, restitution and compensation programs. Offered every other year.

CJ 307 Social Control and Crime Prevention 3 Cr.

The course will focus on crime prevention as a method of social control and will examine processes of social control as social and institutional sources of crime prevention. Examination of personal defense, environmental, situational, community, and social models of crime prevention. Offered every other year.

CJ 308 The Police 3 Cr.

A general survey of American policing and police organizations. Examination of the history of the police and the police idea, as well as structural, cultural, and social psychological analyses of police organizations. Coverage of the topics of police socialization, behavior, and discretion; routine and specialized operations; community policing; and police misconduct, accountability and change in policing. Offered in fall semester.

CJ 310 The Courts 3 Cr.

An analysis of America's courts, and the courtroom work group with particular attention given to the dual role of the courts in adjudicating cases and interpreting the U.S. and state constitutions. Offered in spring semester.

CJ 312 Corrections 3 Cr.

An analysis of the development and present structure of the correctional process in America, including detailed examinations of the operational problems of correctional institutions, probation and parole practices and other community-based correctional alternatives. Offered spring semester.

CJ 314 Restorative Justice 3 Cr.

This course presents a new paradigm of community justice as an alternative to the retributive model. The course examines and contrasts restorative approaches and traditional punitive responses to crime. Topics include mediation, victim-offender reconciliation, reparation for harm done to victims and the community and offender re-integration into the community. Offered on occasion. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

CJ 316 Criminal Violence 3 Cr.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the causes, patterns, and interventions related to violent crimes, including: homicide, robbery, assaults, rape, hate crimes, and terrorism, and in different contexts and settings, such as gangs, the family, the workplace, and schools. Attention is also given to measuring and comparing different forms of violence, theoretical perspectives, challenges in studying violence, current events, and future implications for punishment and prevention. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or permission of instructor.

CJ 318 Transnational Crime 3 Cr.

An examination of key legal and procedural issues impacting the investigation of transnational crime—issues such as extra-territorial jurisdiction of US law, extradition and extra-judicial rendering, and the collection of evidence abroad. Includes relevant case studies on trafficking, organized crime and money laundering, corruption, and national security crimes. Offered every other year. Prerequisites: CJ 101 with a final grade of a C or higher.

CJ 320 Drugs and Society 3 Cr.

This course focuses on the interrelationships between drugs and the social order. Issues considered include: the nature and effects of legal and illegal drugs; the determinants of drug effects, especially the social determinants; the history of drug prohibition; drug addiction and drug treatment; and drug policy. Cross-listed with SO 320. Offered every other year.

CJ 330 Terrorism 3 Cr.

In this course, students examine the critical issues of domestic and international terrorism. The phenomenon of terrorism is analyzed from varying theoretical and empirical perspectives. Topics include terror organizations/networks, ideology, motives, tactics, and propaganda. Attention is also given to terrorism research trends, current events, and future implications. Offered annually. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or permission of instructor.

CJ 341 Cyber Law and Cyber Crime 3 Cr.

This course includes extensive discussion of the legal constraints, both civil and criminal, that underlie acceptable behavior using computers and networks today. Cross-listed as IA241. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or instructor permission. Offered in fall semester.

CJ 350 The Death Penalty 3 Cr.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the death penalty in America, including detailed examination of capital punishment from 1608-modern day, the legal and ethical history of the death penalty, and the administration of the death penalty in America. Topics include issues based on offender and victim race, age, class or sex. Attention is also given to death penalty research trends, current events and future implications. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or permission of instructor. Offered on occasion.

CJ 3XX Criminal Justice Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

CJ 400 Independent Study 3 Cr.

An opportunity for qualified upperclass students to engage in an intensive research program in fields of interest not satisfactorily covered by regular course offerings. Periodic conferences will be required. Prerequisite: written consent of the instructor to a specific project presented by the applicant. Open only to criminal justice majors with a cumulative quality point average of 2.5 or better and who have grades averaging 3.0 or better in prior course work in criminal justice. Offered on occasion.

CJ 402 Law and Society 3 Cr.

An analysis of various theoretical perspectives on the nature, courses, organization and operation of law and legal systems. Emphasis will be placed on law creation, conflict resolution, the legal profession, and the role of law in social change. Cross listed with SO 402. Offered every other year.

CJ 403 Criminal Justice Administration 3 Cr.

An introduction to the principles of public administration as they are applied in the operation of criminal justice agencies. This course will emphasize how such topics as organization, decision making, leadership style, personnel policy, planning, and budgeting are specifically adapted by criminal justice administrators to meet the needs of their agencies. Simulations will be used extensively as a tool for mastering administrative principles. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.

CJ 405 Internship 3 Cr.

This elective course permits an upper-level student to participate directly in the criminal justice process by serving as an aide to agencies involved in the process. This offering is subject to the availability of such internships. Open only to junior and senior criminal justice majors, senior criminal justice minors and non criminal justice students declaring the Transnational Crime minor. Offered fall, spring and summer.

CJ 410 Senior Seminar 3 Cr.

A course dedicated to intensive research and analysis of major issues in criminal justice. Emphasis will be placed on critical thinking and evaluation of topics previously discussed during the student's academic career in the criminal justice program. Attention will also be given to professional development topics, ethics and criminal justice policy. Prerequisite: criminal justice major and senior standing. CJ 410 meets capstone requirement. Offered spring semester.

CJ 421 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems 3 Cr.

This course examines how countries other than the United States deal with the problem of crime and its control. It begins from the classic approach of a critical analysis of the history and development of the world's great legal traditions, and the role and structure of the crimina justice systems inside those traditions. Prerequisite: CJ 101. Offered every other year.

CJ 422 Civil Liability in the Criminal Justice System 3 Cr.

This course examines the civil law that governs criminal justice agencies. As representatives of the government, Criminal Justice agencies must adhere to the Constitution and other State and Federal laws. When they fail to do so, the aggrieved party has the right to sue. This course explores the major state and federal liability theories that govern the management and daily operations of the police and correctional facilities. In addition, this course draws on your previous police, corrections and law courses to explore management issues related to civil liability. Prerequisite: CJ 101, CJ 102, CJ 301. Offered every other year. Open only to juniors and seniors.

CJ 423 Evidence 3 Cr.

The course is an in-depth examination of the rules governing the admissibility or exclusion of evidence at trail. Subjects include competency of witness, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, the rule against hearsay and its exceptions, expert and lay opinion testimony, privileged communications, relevancy, procedural considerations, judicial notice, burden of proof, presumptions, form and type of objections, authentication, the best evidence rule and the use of demonstrative and scientific evidence. Prerequisites: CJ 101 and CJ 102. Offered every other year. Open only to juniors and seniors.

CJ 424 Murder: Our Killing Culture 3 Cr.

This course provides a comprehensive examination of the nature and extent of both the common and unusual forms of murder in the United States. The class examines characteristics, trends, and the theoretical explanations of homicide as well as the prediction and prevention of various kiinds of murder. The impact of murder on homicide survivors is also examined as well as the use of murder as entertainment in our culture. The course is designed to give students greater insight into serial, spree and mass murder, intrafamilial homicide, murder in the workplace, profiling and stalking. Although emphasis is placed on the sociological determinants of murder, psychological and biological factors are also examined. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or permission of instructor. Offered every other year. Open only to juniors and seniors.

CJ 425 Domestic Violence 3 Cr.

This course provides a comprehensive examination of the nature and extent of domestic violence in the United States. Theoretical perspectives used to explain intimate violence are examined as well as the social factors that are related to patterns of intimate and family abuse. The course discusses domestic violence from a historical and global perspecctive and is designed to provide students with a greater understanding of the impact of domestic abuse on victims/survivors and society as a whole. Topics including child and elder abuse; the criminal justice system's response to domestic abuse; intervention, well as related crimes such as sexual assault and intrafamilial homicides. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or permission of instructor. Open only to juniors and seniors. Course is offered every other year.

CJ 430 Homeland Security 3 Cr.

In this course, students examine the critical issues associated with Homeland Security. Homeland Security is analyzed both from a scholarly and practitioner perspective. Topics include infectious diseases, border security, secure air/sea/ground travel, natural catastrophes, terrorism, and critical infrastructure. Federal, state, and local governmental responsibilities and policies are also examined. Attention is also given to Homeland Security research, trends, current events, and future implications. Offered annually. Prerequisite: CJ 101 and CJ 308 or permission of instructor.

CJ 442 Introduction to Computer Forensics 4 Cr.

This course provides the student with an ability to perform basic forensic techniques and use appropriate media analysis software. Knowledge of the security, structure and protocols of network operating systems and devices will be covered as students learn to gather evidence in a networked environment and to image and restore evidence properly without destroying its value. The student will learn and practice gaining evidence from a computer system while maintaining its integrity and a solid chain of custody. Within the laboratory, the student will gain hands-on experience in the use of current investigative tools. Classroom 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites IS 228 and CJ 341. Offered in spring semester.

CJ 444 Crime Analysis and Mapping 3 Cr.

This course provides an introduction to crime analysis and crime mapping and examines techniques used to study crime and disorder patterns faced by law enforcement agencies today. The course will discuss the theory, data collection methods, analysis techniques, technology, statistics, and dissemination products used by crime analysts as well as the history of and career opportunities in crime analysis. Students will learn how to use at least two crime analysis and mapping software applications during the course of the semester. A capstone project for the course involves conducting a crime analysis and mapping project for a Vermont criminal justice agency. Prerequisite: CJ 101 and CJ 209. Offered annually.

CJ 4XX Criminal Justice Elective 3 Cr.

History Courses

HI 107 The History of Civilization I 3 Cr.

A survey providing a global perspective of the history of human cultures and institutions from earliest times to 1500 CE, focusing on Europe, Asia, and Africa. The course offers an active and participatory environment to the study of history through discussions, simulations, study of primary sources, and research assignments. Open only to first year students or by permission of department. Offered annually.

HI 108 The History of Civilization II 3 Cr.

A survey of major world civilizations that provides a global perspective of the development of the modern world from 1500 to the present. The course offers an active and participatory environment to the study of history through discussions, simulations, study of primary sources, and research assignments. Open only to first year students or by permission of department. Offered every semester.

HI 121 American History Survey I 3 Cr.

A survey of American history from the Age of Discovery to 1877. American institutions ranging from political and economic to social and cultural will be examined. Open only to freshmen and sophomores. Offered every semester.

HI 122 American History Survey II 3 Cr.

A continuing survey of multiple facets of American Civilization as presented in HI 121, focusing on the period from the close of political Reconstruction in 1877 to the present. The maturation of democratic institutions and the emergence of the United States as a world power will also be examined. Open only to freshmen and sophomores. Offered every semester.

HI 199 Topics 3 Cr.

HI 1XX History Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

HI 201 Ancient Greece and Rome 3 Cr.

A survey of Greek and Roman civilizations from the origins of the polis to the fall of the Western Roman Empire. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Usually offered annually.

HI 202 The Middle Ages: Europe 500 - 1500 3 Cr.

The history of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire to 1500. The class examines the major political, economic, social, and cultural trends in the development of a distinctive European civilization, built primarily on Christian, Greco-Roman, and Germanic foundations. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Usually offered annually.

HI 209 Historical Methods 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the methods, techniques and conventions of historical research and writing, including such skills as identifying, understanding, analyzing and interpreting primary and secondary sources, compiling bibliographies, citing sources, and understanding historiography. In addition, this course approaches the issue of ethics through a discussion of the ethical responsibilities of historians, including a discussion of plagiarism. Required for all history majors. Open to sophomore history majors only or by permission of department chair. This course does not fulfill the General Education History requirement. The course must be completed by the end of the junior year. Offered annually in the fall semester.

HI 211 Early East Asian Civilizations 3 Cr.

This broad, historical survey course is about the civilizations and cultures of East Asia and the people that lived in them until the immediate post-Mongol conquest period. The core of the course will cover the areas that include modern Japan, China and Korea with reference to the inner Asian steppes. This lecture based course will be supplemented by primary source readings and discussion on Chinese and Japanese cultures, art and political philosophy. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Usually offered annually.

HI 212 Modern East Asian Civilizations 3 Cr.

This is a broad historical survey of the transformation of societies and states in East Asia from traditional empires to modern nation states. Rather than an exhaustive survey of facts and dates, this course is designed to introduce students to key questions in modern East Asian history. This lecture based course will be supplemented by primary source readings and discussion on Chinese and Japanese culture and politics. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Usually offered annually.

HI 214 History of the Middle East 3 Cr.

This course is a survey of a historically vital region. It will include an overview of the area known as the “Cradle of Civilizations and Monotheism,” as well as the rise of the Islamic Caliphate, the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, and the late 19th and 20th Centuries European imperialism and colonialism. The greatest emphasis, however, will be on the modern period. In order to fully comprehend the contemporary situation, it is necessary to include an historical examination of the cultural and religious diversity, as well as the political complexity of the people and states which comprise the so-called Middle East. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Offered in the spring semester.

HI 215 Vermont Regional Material Culture 3 Cr.

A survey of the human-manipulated landscape of Vermont from the time of European settlement in the mid-18th century to the present. The course will trace the impact of economic, social, cultural , and technological forces on the landscape. Students will observe, through extensive field observations, how those forces have shaped the environment of the region. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher and permission of the instructor. 3 lecture hours.

HI 218 Survey of Sub-Sahara Africa 3 Cr.

This course encompasses the history of sub-Saharan Africa from approximately 1800 to the end of the so-called "Cold War." It is a comprehensive introduction to the numerous and diverse cultural, political, and economic entities comprising this complex area of the world. The central themes of the course, however, will be the related phenomena of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, European colonialism, and western neo-colonialism and their varying impact upon the different regions. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.

HI 223 Europe's Age of Revolution. 1500 -1800 3 Cr.

This course traces Europe's path from medieval to modern by examining a series of political, intellectual, and technological revolutions between 1500 and 1800. Topics will include the Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, American and French Revolutions, and the Industrial Revolution, all discussed within the broader context of cultural change, social reform, and technological development, Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Offered annually.

HI 224 Modern European History 3 Cr.

This course examines the political, military, and social history of Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The nineteenth century witnessed remarkable changes in European society and politics. It was an age of romantics and reactionaries, liberals and imperialists, revolutionaries and racists, nationalists and irrationalists. At the beginning of the twentieth century, Europe dominated the world. However, two world wars, the rise and fall of fascism and communism, the concept of superpowers, and the growth of mass consumer society destroyed the old European hegemony and led to a new and evolving idea of "Europe". Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Offered alternate years.

HI 227 Modern British History, 1688 - Present 3 Cr.

The history of the British Isles from the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688 to the region's current struggles with maintaining national identity at the dawn of the twenty-first century. Emphasis will be on the decline of the monarchy, the establishment of parliament as a truly representative body, and the rise and fall of the British Empire. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Offered alternate years.

HI 228 Norwich University History 3 Cr.

The history of Norwich University placed within the context of the history of higher education and the wider framework of U.S. cultural history. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Offered on occasion. 3 lecture hours.

HI 235 Military History I 3 Cr.

This course provides an examination of the major issues evident in the study of military affairs from the dawn of time to the present day. Using a modular approach, this course will explore the following topics: mobile warfare, urban warfare, child soldiers, war in the air, civilians in the path of war, women in war, and the unintended consequences of warfare. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Offered every semester.

HI 236 Military History II 3 Cr.

This course provides an examination of the major issues evident in the study of military affairs from the dawn of time to the present day. Using a modular approach, this course will explore the following topics: the origins of war, total war, soldiers in war, military theory, insurgency & counterinsurgency warfare, military revolutions, and static warfare. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Offered every semester.

HI 260 Topics in History 3 Cr.

Topics will vary.

HI 2XX History Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

HI 303 Colloquium in Ancient History 3 Cr.

A reading and writing intensive course, emphasizing historical research and analytical skills. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the development of historical writing, the Roman Empire, women in antiquity, pagans and Christians, etc. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered annually.

HI 304 Colloquium in Medieval History 3 Cr.

A reading and writing intensive course, emphasizing historical research and analytical skills. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the Crusades. medieval Christianity and medieval women. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered annually.

HI 315 Modern China 3 Cr.

A standard reading and lecture course, Modern China introduces students to the major processes shaping twentieth century Chinese history. The course emphasizes regional knowledge, historical research and analytical skills building. Major topics will include in all cases an overview of Chinese history since 1700 (late imperial and twentieth century "modern" China) with emphasis on political, social history and environmental developments. Other sub-topics in the course include, but are limited to, nation building/nationalism, gender issues, and border/Central Asia relations. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. Offered annually.

HI 317 Modern Japan 3 Cr.

A standard reading and lecture course, Modern Japan introduces students to the major processes of shaping twentieth century Japanese history. The course emphasizes regional knowledge, historical research and analytical skills building. Major topics will include in all cases an overview of Japanese history since 1868 (Tokugawa dissolution through the late twentieth century) with emphasis on political and economic history. Other sub-topics in the course include, but are not limited to, Japan-in-the-world (international relations), gender issues, ethnic relations and the environment. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. Offered on occasion.

HI 319 Colloquium in Chinese History 3 Cr.

This is a thematic, reading and writing intensive course, emphasizing historical research and analytical skills. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the development of ethnicity and ethnic visions of regional history in China, China's military history, frontier/border history, Ancient China and Greece, etc. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered alternate years.

HI 321 Reformation Europe 3 Cr.

The years immediately following the 1517 publication of Martin Luther's Ninety-Five Theses saw a sudden and unprecedented upheaval in European society. This course will examine the social, political, and spiritual context of late medieval Europe, then consider the implications of the Reformation for politics, gender and the modern world. Original sources in translation will form the basis for discussion, supplemented by lecture and secondary materials. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. Offered alternate years.

HI 322 Colloquium in Early Modern European History 3 Cr.

A reading and writing intensive course covering a specialized topic within the history of Early Modern Europe. Topics could include the Thirty Years War, Crime and Deviance, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, or Persecution and Tolerance. Designed for history majors in their junior or senior years. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

HI 326 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust 3 Cr.

This course examines the political, military, cultural and social history of Germany during the period of Nazi rule, 1933-1945. Special attention is given to the sources of support for Nazism, the structure of the National Socialist state, the role of Adolf Hitler, and the Holocaust. Offered alternate years.

HI 329 Modern Russian History, 1917 to the Present 3 Cr.

This course examines the political, military, and social history of Russia and the Soviet Union from the birth of the Soviet state through the present day. The foundations of the Soviet state - ideological, industrial, and soical - proved too shaky to support the needs and expectations of a modern society. From Nicholas II to Lenin, Stalin to Yeltsin, this course examines the unique and dynamic leadership of Russia, as well as the lives of ordinary people in this fascinating culture. Offered alternate years.

HI 331 The Colonial Period of American History 3 Cr.

A study of the settlement and development of the British colonies from their origins to 1763. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. 3 lecture hours.

HI 332 The American Revolution 3 Cr.

A study of the separation of the 13 British colonies from the mother country and establishment of the United States as an independent nation in the period 1763-1789. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. 3 lecture hours.

HI 333 Colloquium in Early American History 3 Cr.

An intensive reading, research and writing course focusing on selected topics relating to early American history. The chronological range of possible topics extends from the Age of Discovery in the sixteenth century through the American Revolution and the ratification of the U.S. Constitution in 1789. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

HI 334 The Citizen-Soldier in American History 3 Cr.

An examination of the evolution of American military policy from the colonial era through the Vietnamese War, giving special attention to the perennial conflict between the advocates of a professional army and the proponents of a civilian soldiery. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. 3 lecture hours.

HI 335 20th Century U.S. History 3 Cr.

A reading and writing intensive course, emphasizing historical research and analytical skills. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the rise of political parties in the United States, the Gilded Age, etc. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

HI 338 U.S. Diplomatic History, 1776-1914 3 Cr.

A study of the foreign relations and foreign policies of the United States from the American Revolution up to the First World War. Topics include territorial expansion, the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War, the expansion of American trade, and the Spanish-American War. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. 3 lecture hours.

HI 339 U.S. Diplomatic History, 1914-present 3 Cr.

A study of the foreign relations and foreign policy of the United States from the First World War to the present. Topics include the two World Wars, the Cold War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and post-cold war policy. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. 3 lecture hours.

HI 340 Colloquium in Twentieth Century United States History 3 Cr.

A reading and writing intensive course, emphasizing historical research and analytical skills. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, World War I, the Great Depression, the 1960's, and the Rise of the Modern Conservative Movement. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

HI 341 U.S. Civil War Era, 1848-1877 3 Cr.

This course examines the causes of the American Civil War, the course of the conflict, and the subsequent period of reconstruction through 1877. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. 3 lecture hours.

HI 345 Colloquium in the History of the Middle East & Northeast Africa 3 Cr.

The colloquium will be an intensive reading, research and writing course focusing on selected historical topics relating to this region of the world. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the rise and expansion of Islam, the Medieval Middle East, the Axum Empire, European Imperialism and Colonialism, the Ottoman Empire, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict. Prerequisite: C or higher in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

HI 355 Colloquium in Modern Military History 3 Cr.

A reading and writing intensive course, emphasizing historical research and analytical skills. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the First World War, the Second World War, the military history of Russia, etc. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

HI 360 Topics in U.S. History 3 Cr.

Topics vary. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission.

HI 361 Topics in Modern European History 3 Cr.

Topics vary. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission.

HI 362 Topics in Pre Modern History 3 Cr.

Topics vary. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission.

HI 363 Topics in Non-Western History 3 Cr.

Topics vary. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission.

HI 371 Nation-Building 3 Cr.

This course provides an exposure to the challenges of crating or re-creating nations after a period of crisis and upheaval. Whether following wars, grants of independence from foreign rule, or human rights atrocities, countries must undertake political, economic, and social reforms to construct stable, popularly accepted, and economically viable polities. How have nations tried to accomplish this complex task in the past hundred years? Historical case studies may be drawn from Africa, the Caribbean, Europe, and Asia. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission. Offered alternate years.

HI 372 Military History of the United States I, 1775-1902 3 Cr.

This course will trace the evolution of American military power from the early days of frontier and revolutionary conflict to an era of American imperial ambition at the end of the nineteenth century. Particular attention will be given to strategic challenges of protecting/expanding the American state, the tactical innovations and failures of nineteenth century warfare, and the formulation of the civil-military relationship in American politics and society. Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission.

HI 373 Military History of the United States II, 1902-Present 3 Cr.

This course will explore the evolution of the American military from its days as a small frontier force at the turn of the twentieth century to its present status as a multi-tasking, global power. Specifically, this course will examine the struggle of American political and military leaders to work together in developing strategies and tactics capable of tackling the complex challenges of modern warfare.Prerequisite: C or better in one 200 level history course or instructor permission.

HI 3XX History Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

HI 400 Independent Study 3 Cr.

An opportunity for qualified upperclass students to engage in an intensive reading or research program in fields of interest not satisfactorily covered by regular course offerings. Periodic conferences will be required. Prerequisites: written consent of the instructor to a specific project presented by the applicant. Offered as occasion demands.

HI 405 History Internship 3-12 Cr.

Supervised experience at a museum, archives, historical society, or restoration project involving research or field work. Direct participation in such activities as the editing of manuscripts, the interpretation of artifacts, or the preservation of historic structures. Prerequisite: permission of department chair. Normally open only to seniors. Offered as occasion demands.

HI 430 Capstone Seminar in United States History 3 Cr.

A semester course for advanced students, primarily for senior History or Studies in War & Peace majors. Topics vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Completion of one history colloquium with a grade of C or higher and permission of the instructor.

HI 431 Capstone Seminar in Modern European History 3 Cr.

A semester course for advanced students, primarily for senior History or Studies in War & Peace majors. Topics vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Completion of one history colloquium with a grade of C or higher and permission of the instructor.

HI 432 Capstone Seminar in Pre-Modern History 3 Cr.

A semester course for advanced students, primarily for senior History or Studies in War & Peace majors. Topics vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Completion of one history colloquium with a grade of C or higher and permission of the instructor.

HI 433 Seminar in Non-Western History 3 Cr.

A semester course for advanced students, primarily for senior History or Studies in War & Peace majors. Topics vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Completion of one history colloquium with a grade of C or higher and permission of the instructor. 3 lecture hours.

HI 490 Honors in History I 3 Cr.

First semester of a two semester sequence honors thesis project. The first semester is devoted primarily to research. Not repeatable for credit. Does not fulfill distribution requirement for major.

HI 491 Honors in History II 3 Cr.

Second semester of a two semester sequence. The second semester is devoted to writing and defending the honors thesis. Not repeatable for credit. Does not fulfill distribution requirement for major. Prerequisite: A grade of "B" or higher in HI 490 and permission of the program director and department chair. 3 lecture hours.

Political Science Courses

PO 105 American Politics 3 Cr.

A study of the theoretical, institutional, and behavioral elements of the U.S. political system. Offered both semesters. Open freshman only, except by permission of department chair or unless a major requirement for another program or major. Open to students with freshmen and sophomore standing only, otherwise instructor permission.

PO 106 Introduction to Public Policy and Administration 3 Cr.

An introductory examination of theoretical and practical approaches to policymaking and administration, the essential steps in the proces, and the roles of key actors at all levels. This course prepares students for more in-depth study of all other facets of the political realm. Open to students with freshmen and sophomore standing only, otherwise instructor permission.

PO 1XX Political Science Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

PO 202 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 Cr.

An introductory course that acquaints students with the comparative study of politics. The course will compare executive and legislative relationships, electoral systems, ideologies, and political parties. Various countries from around the world will be used to illustrate the application and consequences of different institutions and ideas. Open to students with freshmen and sophomore standing only, otherwise instructor's permission.

PO 215 International Relations 3 Cr.

An inquiry in assumptions, theories, and dogmas of the modern state system. Examination and evaluation of such topics as realist theory; conflict resolution; game theory; decision-making theory; and ecopolitics. Open to students with freshmen and sophomore standing only, otherwise instructor's permission.

PO 220 Research Methods 3 Cr.

An introduction to the methods of political analysis, standard nomenclature, and basic research methods relied upon in the study of politics. Emphasis is placed on quantitative methods and ethical issues in conducting research. Not open to freshman without instructor's permission.

PO 2XX Political Science Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

PO 300 Special Topics in Politics 3 Cr.

Select topics offered on occasion. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

PO 301 Special Topics in International Relations 3 Cr.

Select topics in the area of International Relations offered on occasion. Topics courses may be repeated for credit as long as a different topic is offered. 3 lecture hours. pre-req of PO 215, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 303 Political Philosophy 3 Cr.

After introducing the political philosophies of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, this course explores the ideas of major Western thinkers from the Renaissance through the Industrial Revolution. The course not only examines each philosopher's understandings of power, justice, equality and freedom, but also contemporary applications and implications of these ideas. Open to Sophomore 2 and above, otherwise instructor permission.

PO 305 Geopolitics 3 Cr.

Geopolitics will give students an increased appreciation of the influence of geography on political decision-making. This course will help students "visualize" world politics and understand how geography affects both national and transnational political behaviors. Students will learn to think and write critically about such issues and forces as globalization, development, and conflict. Students will develop an understanding of how interests and perceptions are shaped by geography. Pre-req of PO 202 or PO 215, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 310 European Politics 3 Cr.

A study of the political systems, cultures, and issues of selected countries from western, northern and southern Europe as well as Russia and the European Union. This course will also consider the relationship between domestic and foreign policies and the relationship between the United States and Europe. Pre-req of PO 202, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 312 The Presidency 3 Cr.

A study of the presidential office and its relationship with the major American political institutions. Pre-req of PO 105, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 313 Political Parties and Interest Groups 3 Cr.

A study of political parties and interest groups as they influence the decision making process, the formulation of government policy, and the selection of official personnel. Pre-req of PO 105, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 314 The Legislative Process 3 Cr.

A study of the national and state legislatures in the United States through a combination of lectures, readings, contact with legislators, and actual investigations on the state legislative scene itself. Pre-req of PO 105, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 315 Public Opinion and Political Behavior 3 Cr.

A study of the development of political attitudes and the formation of public opinion; the influence of public opinion on governmental policy through its relationship to political participation representation and leadership. Pre-req of PO 105, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 320 Topics in Area Studies 3 Cr.

Selected topics in area studies will be offered on occasion. This course will be used to cover subjects not included in the regular offerings in comparative politics. Topics may include the politics of a particular country or region such as Latin America, Africa, Eastern Europe, or the Middle East. A topics course may also be offered on a particular issue area such as foreign and defense policy, healthcare policy, welfare policy, or environmental policy. Pre-req of PO 202, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 321 U.S. Constitutional Law 3 Cr.

Introduction to the evolution and structure of the American constitutional system, focusing on the federal relationship, the separation of powers, and judicial review, relying primarily upon the case method of analysis. Open to Sophomore 2 and above, otherwise instructor permission.

PO 324 Civil Liberties 3 Cr.

An examination of the relationship of individuals to government, relying primarily upon the case method of study, with specific consideration of problems of equal protection, due process, privacy, and freedoms of speech and religion. Open to Sophomore 2 and above, otherwise instructor permission.

PO 330 American Citizenship 3 Cr.

Using the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights as a foundation, this course examines what it means to be a citizen of the United States. The course addresses such questions as: What are citizens entitled to and what do they owe the state and each other? Is there an obligation to obey political authority? Is there ever an obligation to disobey authority? An important consideration is the role of the military in American political life and in particular, the relationship between the military ethic and republican values. Pre-req of PO 105, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 331 State and Local Politics 3 Cr.

The primary objective of this course is to gain an understanding of the role of the state and local political institutions within the context of American federalism. Emphasis is placed on procedural and policy differences as well as political issues in state, regional, and local governments. Pre-req of PO 105, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 333 American Foreign Policy 3 Cr.

Through studies of the three "levels of analysis" personal political psychology, bureaucratic politics, and international relations-this course examines the processes of American foreign policy formulation and execution; it explores the objectives, methods, and consequences of major U.S. foreign and military policies. If practicable, students will take part in role-playing simulations. Pre-req of PO 105 or PO 202, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 340 Revolution and Forces of Change 3 Cr.

A critical analysis of several revolutions that will examine causes, outcomes, and accepted explanations in an attempt to discern generalities applicable to all revolutions. Pre-req of PO 202, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 348 Asian Politics 3 Cr.

A study of the political systems, cultures, and issues of the People's Republic of China, Taiwan, Japan, North and South Korea, Vietnam, Indonesia, Pakistan, and India. This course will pay particular attention to the relationship between the West and Asia, the processes of "modernization," and the role of Asia in contemporary international relations. Pre-req of PO 202, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 3XX Political Science Transfer Elective 3 Cr.

PO 400 Independent Study 3 Cr.

An opportunity for qualified upperclass students to engage in an intensive reading or research program in fields of interest not satisfactorily covered by regular course offerings. Periodic conferences will be required. Prerequisite: written consent of the instructor to a specific project presented by the applicant. Offered as occasion demands. Open to upperclassmen, otherwise by permission of the instructor.

PO 403 Internship 3-15 Cr.

Direct participation in the practical workings of state, municipal, and Federal government. Ordinarily open only to seniors. Offered on availability to internships. Credits to be determined by instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

PO 405 International Organizations 3 Cr.

This course focuses on the increasingly influential and varied roles international organizations play in the world today from peace and security to international development, human rights, and environmental protection. It traces the evolution of the thinking behind, and efforts to establish international organizations, and analyzes not only their promise and challenges, but also their successes and failures to date. Although particular attention is paid to the United Nations and its many affiliated bodies, regional organizations (e.g. European Union, Organization of American States, African Union, NATO), international non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multi-national corporations are also assessed. Offered alternate years. pre-req of PO 215, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 410 Capstone Seminar in Political Science 3 Cr.

A research and writing course designed to introduce students to graduate standards of original research and critical writing in political science. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

PO 412 War and Peace 3 Cr.

An inquiry into the ostensible causes of war-- biological, economic, psychological, strategic, and theological; and an examination of the purported causes of war -- personal probity, military counterpoise, political utopia, and world government. Preparation of a substantial paper is required. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

PO 415 International Law 3 Cr.

This course examines the development of international law, and assesses its effectiveness in governing the relations among nation-states. The course examines early as well as more recent efforts to build a body of such law. It compares international law with domestic law, and explores the principal sources of international law. The course uses cases to analyze the development of international law in areas such as extraterritorial jurisdiction, the range of sovereignty, diplomatic relations, the treaty system, arbitration and adjudication, the use of force, human rights, the environment, and economic relations. Offered alternate years. Pre-req of PO 215, C or higher; open to all students.

PO 490 Honors in Political Science 3 Cr.

A substantial, sequential, research and writing project. See description of department honors program. Offered as occasion demands. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

PO 491 Honors in Political Science 3 Cr.

The second semester of honors in political science. Devoted to writing and defending the honors thesis. Prerequisite: Student must earn a grade of B or higher in PO 490 and permission of the instructor and program coordinator.