Master of Science in Nursing

Program Director: Paulette Thabault
Program Coordinator: Janice Hansen

Norwich University offers the Master of Science in Nursing with concentrations in Healthcare Systems Leadership, Nursing Informatics, and Nursing Education. The program is fully approved by the Vermont State Nursing Board and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

The Norwich University Master of Science in Nursing with a concentration in Healthcare Systems Leadership is a 36 credit-hour program designed to provide graduates with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed as nurse leaders in a variety of health care settings.

The Master of Science in Nursing with a concentration in Nursing Informatics is 36 credit-hour program which prepares the graduate to function in a variety of information systems leadership roles and to sit for the national certification examination.

The Master of Science in Nursing with a concentration in Education is a 40 credit-hour program which prepares the graduate  to assume roles in formal academic settings or in staff development positions. 

Mission

The purpose of the Master of Science in Nursing program is to prepare visionary nurse leaders who demonstrate advanced critical thinking, communication, and decision making skills to ensure quality outcomes within the complex systems of the health care continuum. Graduates are prepared to initiate and effectively utilize research findings to improve outcomes, as well as utilize knowledge of health promotion, health care policy and systems, change and finance to effectively manage available resources in the changing health care environment. Masters prepared nurses utilize this knowledge base integrated with theories from nursing and related disciplines to create and implement ethical practices and policies to improve the environment in which health care is delivered.

The Masters prepared nurse engages in an expanded scope of practice that is characterized by critical analysis of problems and creative problem solving, and application of theories in the decision making process. The graduate manages change effectively and utilizes effective communication skills and technologies to create collaborative partnerships within nursing and across health care disciplines. Graduate education prepares the nurse to identify and evaluate personal and organization values and to implement ethical decisions and strategies to improve outcomes.

Program Outcomes

  • Initiate and effectively utilize research findings to improve outcomes across the spectrum of nursing environments.
  • Integrate knowledge of health promotion, health care policy and systems, change and finance to effectively manage available resources in the nursing environment.
  • Integrate theories from nursing and related disciplines to create and implement ethical practices and policies to improve nursing practice.
  • Critically analyze problems and demonstrate theory based problem solving in making decisions across a variety of nursing settings.
  • Plan and manage change effectively.
  • Incorporate the knowledge and skills related to informatics and technology to effectively improve nursing practice.
  • Implement effective communication skills to create collaborative partnerships within nursing and across health care disciplines.  
  • Apply the principles of translational science and implementation/improvement science, advocacy and appreciative inquiry in the context of the advanced nursing role.

Curriculum Map 

Term 1
Advanced Nursing Care in the Delivery of Healthcare6
Term 2
Translating and Integrating Scholarship into Practice6
Term 3
Quality Improvement, Informatics & Healthcare Technologies6
Term 4
Concentration course(s)
6
Term 5
Concentration course(s)
6-10
Term 6
Concentration course(s)
6
Residency 10
Total Cr.36-40


Curriculum Requirements

The program’s first three seminars (18 credits) are common core content seminars and provide the foundation for specialization, addressing the study of health care delivery systems, ethical issues, and theoretical bases for nursing, leadership, and research. The remaining seminars (18 credits) address the specific content essential for either the concentration in nursing administration or in nursing education. 

Core Courses (18 credits)

NR 512Advanced Nursing Care in the Delivery of Healthcare6
NR 522Translating and Integrating Scholarship into Practice6
NR 532Quality Improvement, Informatics & Healthcare Technologies6
Culminating Academic Requirement
NR 595Residency0
Total Cr.18


Concentrations (18 - 22 credits)

Healthcare Systems Leadership Concentration
NR 546Leadership in Healthcare Organizations6
Select two of the following
Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Healthcare6
Healthcare Resource Management6
Healthcare Management6
NR 566Strategic Planning and Management in Healthcare6
Total Cr.18
Nursing Informatics Concentration
NR 547Theoretical and Practice Foundations of Nursing Informatics6
NR 557Strategic Planning and Practice Applications in Nursing Informatics6
NR 567Using Informatics to improve Nursing Practice6
Total Cr.18
Nursing Education Concentration
NR 541Clinical Concepts: Advanced Pharmacology3
NR 542Clinical Concepts: Advanced Health Assessment3
NR 543Clinical Concepts: Pathophysiology for Disease Management4
Students may substitute the following for NR 543
ClinicalConceptsADV Pathophys11
ClinicalConceptsADV Pathophys21
ClinicalConcept ADV Pathophys31
ClinicalConceptsADV Pathophys41
NR 551Theoretical Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction6
NR 561Scholarship of Teaching, Learning, and Evaluation6
Total Cr.22


One-Week Residency

All degree candidates of the Master of Science in Nursing are required to attend a one-week Residency Conference on the Norwich University campus, during which they may attend professional presentations, participate in roundtable discussions with faculty, and present papers. The one-week residency is a degree requirement.

Faculty Member Institution at which highest degree was earned
Jonathon Brown, DNP George Washington University
Janet Dupont, PhD Capella University
Betty Fair, PhD University of Texas
Emily Gessner, DNP Northeastern University
Jean Gordon, DBA Nova Southeastern University
Jo Anne Grunow, PhD Rush University
Lisa Hawthorne, PhD University of San Diego
Nancy Kupka, DNS Rush University
Mario Ortiz, PhD Loyola University
Linda Tjiong, DBA University of Sarasota
Richard Watters, PhD University of Western Australia
Hope Williamson, DNP University of Miami