Master’s Degrees

Dean: William H. Clements
Associate Dean of Administration: Debra R. Wick 
Associate Dean of Enrollment Management: John A. Kunelius
Chair, Division of Graduate Programs: James M. Ehrman

Graduate Studies

The College of Graduate and Continuing Studies is committed to lifelong and experiential learning in a distance education delivery format. All master’s degrees offered by the College are delivered online and designed to meet the professional and career needs of adult learners. The College of Graduate and Continuing Studies is built on a rigorous academic environment emphasizing interactive classes, mentoring relationships with faculty, extensive hands-on learning and application to the workplace or real-world challenges, consistent with Alden Partridge’s experiential approach to education. A wide variety of teaching tools is available to both faculty and students, with easy access to the resources available through the Norwich University online library.

College of Graduate and Continuing Studies programs share a similar structure and typically require 36 credit hours to complete, through six credit-hour seminars, eleven weeks in duration. The College of Graduate and Continuing Studies strives to create classes that facilitate high levels of interaction and mentoring with average enrollments of 12-16 students, who often proceed through the program with other students entering the program at the same time. Seminars are asynchronous, allowing students to participate at any time, day or night, from anywhere in the world. Students may enter a program at one of four enrollment periods during the year in June, September, December, and March, and generally enroll for a twelve credit-hour semester with seminars taken sequentially.

All candidates for the masters' degrees are required to attend an annual residency conference held on campus each year, in June. Students participate in the conference through a variety of capstone and academic events and conclude the week-long residency with academic recognition and commencement ceremonies.

The College of Graduate and Continuing Studies awards the following master’s degrees:


This section of the university catalog contains information about academic policies, programs of study, and the required residency conference as they pertain to students enrolled in master's degrees offered online through the College of Graduate and Continuing Studies.

Business Administration Courses

GB 501 Fundamentals of Business Management 6 Cr.

This seminar presents broad-based fundamental learning in economics, management, and marketing and operations management from the perspective of a business manager. Students will focus on the economic framework for business decision-making, learning the importance of an ability to assess market conditions as the context for all business strategy development and implementation, The seminar will emphasize management’s ability to plan for an execute advantageous strategy so as to achieve organization objectives through efficient and effective allocation of its human, capital and intellectual resources. Marketing and operations management will be a core seminar component in which students will learn theory and skills that represent best practices in the marketing and operations management of products and services. Prerequisites: None.

GB 502 Quantitative Methods and Financial Analysis for Managers 6 Cr.

Since accounting is a well defined system of activities to record, measure and interpret financial information, this seminar will concentrate on the learning and demonstration of competency in the accounting process, consisting of understanding of the accounting equation, the basics of double-entry bookkeeping which results in the creation of the three primary financial statements, the income statement, the balance sheet and the statement of cash flow. Furthermore, learning the meaning of the important constituent accounts in these statements, what effects them and the calculation of financial ratios as tests of enterprise profitability, asset utilization, risk and liquidity will be required.

GB 511 Strategic Resources Management 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on the strategic management of the intangible assets of an organization: human capital, information capital, and organizational capital. Human motivation, workforce utilization, performance measurement, leadership, organizational culture and change, management information systems, knowledge management, and contingency planning are discussed in detail during the seminar. You learn to translate strategy into operational terms and to align the organization to its strategy.

GB 522 Managerial Finance 6 Cr.

This seminar is designed to introduce the student to the problems of finance function and to the responsibilities of the chief financial executive and his/her staff in the ongoing operations of the firm. Emphasis will be on efficient allocation and uses of funds. The seminar includes many topics such as Financial Analysis, Cash Flow and Financial Planning, Capital Budgeting, Valuation Models, Risk and Return Analysis, Leverage and Capital Structure, Working Capital Management, and International Business Finance.

GB 532 Strategic Marketing & Operations Management 6 Cr.

This seminar centers on Marketing and Operations Management each from their own functional perspectives in a business organization and how to achieve integration of the two functions for optimal business performance. The seminar uses the Product Life Cycle (PLC) model as a framework for integrating the two disciplines and demonstrating how the nature and interface of marketing and operations change as the firms products evolve through the PLC. Prerequisite: Completion of Seminar 522.

GB 544 Project Management Techniques, Tools and Practices 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on the "nuts and bolts" or fundamentals of project management and practices. The course will explore the key elements of project management from the project management framework, the project life cycle, project process and key project management knowledge areas. Additionally, the project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, resource and schedule management will be studied. Other key areas of focus will be project management procurement and overall project comunications requirements.

GB 545 Multinational Business Finance 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses both on Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance and on Multinational Business Finance. Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) are unique institutions that act as catalysts and facilitators of international trade and as important producers and marketers in host countries where their subsitiaries are located. This seminar builds on seminar 2 but it also identifies and describes in details the differences between multinational business finance and domestic financial management. The major topics presented in this seminar are Global Financial Environment, Foreign Exchange Theory, The Foreign Exchange Market and Derivatives, Foreign Exchange Exposure, Financing The Global Firm, Foreign Investment Decisions, and Managing Multinational Operations. Prerequisites: Completion of Seminar 2, or permission of the program director.

GB 547 Supply Chain Management Strategy, Planning and Operations 6 Cr.

The focus of this seminar is on the building of business supply chain strategies, which include: supply chain performance, fit and scope, supply chain drivers and metrics, processes, the management of suppliers, inventory strategies, parts management and distribution. Additionally this seminar will examine demand forecasting, aggregate planning and sales and operation planning, uncertainty, and archetype strategies with a focus on flexibility, speed and technology. Think of this seminar as a journey from supply chain management & logistics strategies to manufacturing research planning (MRP).

GB 548 Energy Resources and Markets 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on building basic knowledge in the energy resources and markets that include: introduction to the origins and the typology of the alternate ways to generate energy; price formation of energy and its markets; description of the existing markets and their most common negotiating instruments in relation to each type of energy: oil, natural gas, coal and electricity; development of energy markets and its regulations in U.S., EU and Latin America; environmental and climate change policies; and the feasible energy mix for the organization under the security of supply.

GB 552 International Business Management 6 Cr.

The International Business Seminar addresses the strategic management of internationally active organizations. A theoretical framework is provided that will enable learners to compare, contrast, and evaluate the differences between domestic-only and internationally active organizations. Learners will examine and apply concepts pertaining to the globalization of business, the internationalization of a specific organization, and the factors that influence to these two outcomes. Learners will learn how to make decisions rooted in the increasingly international context of today's business world.

GB 553 Organizational Leadership 6 Cr.

Each component of this seminar will contribute to a single integrated learning experience about leading change in an organization. As leaders, you will try out proven change management processes and techniques while learning to develop action plans to help in the achievement of tangible successful results. Topics will consider both a global virtual world and on-site workplace environments. Learn about different change management models and problem-solving techniques to apply to different scenarios. Learn to apply information effectively as you lead change.

GB 554 Project Management Leadership, Communications and Teams 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on the important aspects of project management leadership, effective communications and the management of project teams. In this seminar the students will explore the fundamental principles of good project management, which will include: leadership skills, winning stakeholder cooperation, writing the rules to manage expectations, project risk management, creating realistic schedules, achieving accurate project estimates, trade-offs between project cost, schedule and quality, building strong project teams, clear communications, measuring progress, problem solving, defining clear requirements and applying lean principles in project management. This seminar will take these important project leadership, communication and team management skills and integrate them with some of the key concepts and ideas coming out of Semonar 4's "nuts and bolts" seminar, resulting in fundamental principles of project management being integrated with leadership, communications and team building practices and challenges.

GB 555 Investments and Portfolio Management 6 Cr.

This seminar is concerned with the characteristics and analysis of individual securities as well as with the theory and practice of optimally combining securities into portfolios. The recent creation of new securities and trading strategies that would have been impossible without concurent advances in computer and communications technology combined with continuing progress in the theory of investments have made the field of investments and portfolio management much more complex and exciting. This seminar will be organized around two basic themes that security market is a highly efficient market and an investor who diversifies and takes a long-term approach to investing is generally rewarded with higher returns and less risk. These simple observations are, extremely, powerful in their implications for planning and implementation of investment strategies.

GB 557 Supply Chain Management Logistics, Design and Execution 6 Cr.

This seminar is focused on supply chain warehousing and logistics which includes supply chain “movement”, warehouse design, capacity management, delivering customer value, measuring logistics cost and performance, matching up supply with demand, creation of a responsive supply chain and the management of complexity and risk.

GB 558 Energy Saving Efficiency Proj 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on managing the organization's project to save and use energy in the most efficient way, including introductions to sustainability, energy intensity, energy efficiency and savings. These aspects are reviewed for electricity and heat generators energy systems. Along its rolling, students will develop an efficiency solution project for a company or for an aggregation of them, including financial aspects, auditing and energy strategies. Prerequisites: GB548.

GB 560 Strategic Management 6 Cr.

This seminar addresses the strategic management of entire organizations, which implies total responsibility for integrating and coordinating all activities and the accomplishment of long-term goals that determine organizational survival. Analytical models are used to dissect actual case scenarios, identify the real nature of business problems, and develop strategic recommendations for their resolution. Students will debate the topical and controversial issues of the day in corporate management and will have the opportunity to interact with industry leaders. The seminar concludes with a project that integrates results of prior seminars into a cohesive strategic analysis of an international company. A comprehensive outcomes assessment examination will be administered during this seminar.

GB 564 Strategic Management in Project Management 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on the application of the concepts and ideas coming from the GB544 and GB 554. In this seminar, the students will apply the fundamental principles of project management from the project management framework, the project life cycle, project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, and schedule management. Students will also include the integration of leadership skills, winning stakeholder cooperation, project risk management, building strong project teams, clear communications, measuring progress and problem solving in the completion of a proposed project. Prerequisites: GB544 and GB554, or permission of the Program Director.

GB 565 Strategic Management in Finance 6 Cr.

The aim of this seminar is to illustrate and exercise the application of tools and concepts of modern finance. This seminar represents the culmination of the study of finance at Norwich University MBA program. The seminar relies on the techniques and theories of Corporate Finance, Multinational Business Finance, and Investments to expand the students’ strategic perspectives and enhance their financial analysis skills. Case analysis is the approach used in this seminar and managing for corporate value creation is the focus of all cases used in this seminar. Prerequisites: GB522, GB545, and GB555.

GB 567 Supply Chain Management Assessment, Integration, and Optimization 6 Cr.

GB 568 Managing CorporateEnergy Needs 6 Cr.

The main focus of this seminar is energy procurement optimization with security of supply, quality and low cost. The objectives of the seminar include: how to value available and feasible energy sources of supply, manage energy procurement processes, contracts management, sector supply strategies, demand forecasting, quantitative risk assessment, the company flow of information and cooperative procurement techniques. All included, this seminar will explore a detailed behavior of each relevant energy market (oil, gas & electricity) from the demand point of view. GB568 complements the two previous seminars in this concentration, GB548 and GB558. Components of the energy markets and the available energy origins are reviewed in depth, as well as the internal analysis of the organization needs and processes, to optimize all aspects of the company’s energy procurement. As a concluding seminar of this concentration, the students will reach the concentration learning outcomes by acquiring analytical and managerial capacity and skills to resolve the energy procurement of the organization. Prerequisites: Completion of seminars GB548 and GB558. note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

GB 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Civil Engineering Courses

CE 501 Hydraulics for Environmental Engineers 3 Cr.

A review of fluid mechanics and hydraulics fundamentals. Pipe flow and networks, open channel flow, measurement techniques for fluids.

CE 503 Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering 6 Cr.

Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics: an introduction to the engineering properties of soils: theory of soil compression and shear strength with practical applications. Fundamentals of Foundation Engineering: determination of bearing capacity and settlement characteristics of shallow and deep foundations. Design and evaluation of earth slopes and earth retaining structures. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Master of Civil Engineering program.

CE 505 Engineering Analysis Techniques 3 Cr.

A fast-paced review of fundamental techniques from typical undergraduate level calculus courses. Mastery of these topics is required for success in the differential equations and engineering analysis courses in the MCE program.

CE 506 Engineering Mechanics I 3 Cr.

A review of engineering mechanics fundamentals from the fields of statics, dynamics, and mechanics of materials. Free body diagrams, force systems, equilibrium, geometric properties, kinematics, kinetics, stress and strain.

CE 507 Fundamentals of Structural Engineering 6 Cr.

A review of the basic concepts of structural engineering that form the required background for later courses. Types of structures, construction materials, structural design, and safety issues are discussed. Students will become familiar with a number of typical structural design calculation methods for later use.

CE 509 Fundamentals of Environmental/Water Resources Engineering 6 Cr.

A review of the basic concepts of environmental and water resources engineering that form the required background for later courses. Basic concepts from environmental chemistry, ecology, biology, microbiology, geology, and soil science along with an introduction to environmental engineering field. Designed to prepare students for entry into the Environmental Engineering / Water Resources concentration of the Master of Civil Engineering program.

CE 523 Intermediate Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering 6 Cr.

Intermediate Soil Mechanics: general principles of soil mechanics and their applications, including soil structure, mineralogy, fluid flow through porous media, shear strength, slope stability, primary consolidation and secondary consolidation. Classical earth pressure theories. Subjects will be presented from a theoretical perspective and include practical applications. Foundation Engineering: analysis of shallow and deep foundations including bearing capacity and settlement of shallow footings, floating foundations, drilled piers and piles. Analysis of stability and design of retaining walls and anchored bulkheads. Prerequisite: EG 501 (Engineering Mathematics) or permission of Program Director.

CE 525 Physiochemical & Biological Processes in Water & Wastewater Treatment 6 Cr.

Physical, chemical, biological, and advanced treatment unit processes. This course will cover basic physical, chemical and biological concepts, reactor kinetics, water and wastewater qualities and quantities, and physical, chemical, and biological unit processes. Design of individual unit processes and integration of unit processes into treatment trains capable of meeting treatment objectives will be emphasized. Prerequisite: EG 501.

CE 528 Classical, Matrix, and Dynamic Analysis of Structures 6 Cr.

This course addresses two tracks of analysis. First, static analysis is investigated with advanced classical methods and with matrix methods, the cornerstone of the finite element method. Second, dynamic analysis is presented using both classical and matrix approaches for single and multiple degree of freedom systems. Analysis issues related to design codes are addressed for both static and dynamic conditions. The use of commercially available software is introduced. Prerequisite: EG 501.

CE 529 Information Technology 6 Cr.

This course develops a base level competency in a host of project management software products. Virtual Design and Construction applications as well as enterprise wide IT solutions will be examined. In addition it develops an understanding of the importance of integrating an information technology strategy across all aspects of the project and the organization. Prerequisite: EG 501 (Engineering Mathematics) or permission of Program Director.

CE 533 Earthquake Engineering and Soil Stabilization 6 Cr.

Earthquake Engineering: evaluation of geotechnical earthquake hazards and mitigation. Plate tectonics, seismicity, wave propagation, characterization of ground motions, theory of vibrations, effect of local soil conditions on ground response, development of design ground motions, liquefaction, dynamic lateral earth pressures, slope stability and deformation, earthquake design codes. Soil Stabilization: the application of mineralogical and physicochemical principals to soil stabilization problems, and stabilization techniques for highway and foundation applications. Prerequisite: CE 523 (Intermediate Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering) or permission of Program Director.

CE 535 Stormwater Management and GIS Applications for Water Resources 6 Cr.

Storm water management issues, from both flood control and water quality points of view, are integral water resource components associated with land development, urbanization, and watershed hydrology. This course will examine rainfall-runoff relationships (including statistical analysis), channel and basin routing, storm water treatment, low impact development, best management practices, and wetland utilization and benefit/cost ratio analysis. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software will be introduced and applied for examining and analyzing decision-making processes involved with the storm water management components of the course.

CE 538 Design of Steel and Timber Structures 6 Cr.

An exploration of advanced structural design issues in the areas of both steel and timber. Using the latest provisions from the American Institute of Steel Construction and the National Design Specification for Wood Construction the course will cover the design and behavior of 2-D and 3-D framing, framing members and connections under various loading conditions, including wind and seismic. Strength and serviceability issues.

CE 539 Contracts and Insurance 6 Cr.

This course addresses the risk characteristics of various contractual forms and the place that insurance and surety plays in the AEC arena. The emergence of new contractual forms from AIA and the Consensus Docs require a new perspective on contracts and the project organization. This seminar will develop a strategic understanding of contract variables that span plans and specs to Integrated Project Delivery. Prerequisite: CE 529 (Information Technology) or permission of Program Director.

CE 553 Computer Modeling in Geotechnical Engineering and Geotechnical Engineering Case Histories 6 Cr.

Survey of computer methods and applications for analysis of complex geotechnical engineering problems. Finite element, finite difference and closed form solution techniques, modeling applications. Review of select geotechnical engineering case studies. The course will also spend time formulating proposals for the student's upcoming capstone design project in CE 561. Prerequisite: CE 533 (Earthquake Engineering and Soil Stabilization) or permission of Program Director.

CE 555 Geoenvironmental Engineering - Groundwater Flow and Waste Containment 6 Cr.

This course approaches the field of geoenvironmental engineering from two points of view: groundwater flow and contaminant transport issues and the principals related to solid waste disposal and containment. The groundwater portion of the course will focus on flow and contaminant transport including aquifer properties, principles of ground-water flow, flow into wells, soil moisture and ground-water recharge, regional ground-water flow and the advection, diffusion and attenuation of ground-water contaminants. The solid waste portion of the course will focus on landfill siting, design and construction. Material properties and engineering design of geosynthetic components including geomembranes, geotextiles, geocomposites, and geosynthetic clay liners. Methods to estimate and design landfill leachate quantities and gas generation. The course will also spend time formulating proposals for the student's upcoming capstone design project in CE 561.

CE 558 Design of Reinforced and Prestressed/Precast Concrete Structures 6 Cr.

This course focuses on advanced topics in reinforced concrete design and an introduction to prestressed / precast concrete using the provisions of the American Concrete Institute. Beams, slabs, columns, deflections, analysis and design of prestressed members, loss calculations, use of standard precast members. Design and detailing for seismic loads. The course will also spend time formulating proposals for the student's upcoming capstone design project in CE 561.

CE 559 Project Finance and Accounting 6 Cr.

This course focuses on understanding project risk and financial performance across all project participants. It will address traditional financial arrangements as well as new models such as the Special Purpose Entity (SPE) and Public Private Partnerships (PPP). This seminar will enable the student to address the ever increasing complexity of the financial arena. The course will also spend time formulating proposals for the student's upcoming capstone design project in CE 561. Prerequisite: CE 539 (Contracts and Insurance) or permission of Program Director.

CE 561 Capstone Design Project 6 Cr.

Civil engineering projects have always had social, political, economic, and environmental impacts. The capstone design project requires you to anticipate these impacts prior to project implementation. As the engineer in a leadership position you will direct the project from conception to completion. This includes the preparation of a comprehensive project business plan that will include project goals, political hurdles, anticipated revenues and expenses, marketing, facility design, etc.; all pertaining to the design of a major civil engineering project.

CE 571 Elementary Geotechnical Tools Laboratory 1 Cr.

Survey of techniques for classification of soils, assessment of hydraulic properties, consolidation, and assessment of shear strength parameters of soils. Field experience in geotechnical exploration. Corequisite: CE 503 (Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering) or permission of Program Director.

CE 572 Intermediate Geotechincal Tools Laboratory 1 Cr.

Survey of techniques for assessing permeability of soils using the flexible wall apparatus, Proctor compaction and triaxial shear testing. Field visit to geotechnical project site. Prerequisite: CE 553 (Numerical Methods in Geotechnical Engineering) or permission of Program Director.

CE 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Common Engineering Courses

EG 501 Engineering Mathematics 6 Cr.

First and second order differential equations, basic matrix algebra with emphasis on solving systems of equations and understanding eigenvalues and eigenvectors, numerical techniques for solving both differential and algebraic equations, and an introduction to partial differential equations. Basic concepts in probability and statistics, random variables, testing hypotheses, confidence intervals, and correlation along with the least square line. In addition to solving problems by hand, students will also be using software tools. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Master of Civil Engineering program.

Diplomacy Courses

GD 510 Theory and the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will review the basic theories that govern the international relations discipline. As no one theory fully explains the international system, a firm grasp of the leading paradigms gives a student a solid foundation on which to build the degree. This seminar will also trace the historical evolution of diplomacy within the international system giving the student a sense of its progression and an awareness of the milestones of diplomatic interaction within that system.

GD 511 The History of Diplomacy in the International System 6 Cr.

This seminar is a comprehensive overview of diplomacy, international relations, and world order in the context of the modern state system, from 1648 to the present. The seminar provides an introduction to the international political environment through studies in foreign policy decision-making. The seminar combines the fields of history and political science by using an analytical framework of historiography and International Relations methodology.

GD 520 Law and the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will explore some of the important principles, norms, customs, laws, and transactions in international relations. Student will be introduced to international law terminology, history, and dominant theories. The laws surrounding conflict, war and war crimes will be explored. Of special interest will be the laws and norms pertaining to international organizations. Finally, the more up and coming areas of international law will be explored, such as, environmental law and the growing body of law concerning humanitarian intervention.

GD 530 Economics and the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will explore the international economic system. The impact of modernization and economic development within the system will be examined. The controversy over the concept of globalization will be explored. The seminar will address the dominant theories of international political economy. Students will become familiar with institutions of international finance and trade. Special attention will be given to Third World development issues. Also, the idea of economics as a tool of diplomacy and military power will be raised.

GD 540 Conflict Avoidance, Prevention & Containment in the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will address a number of schools of thought and debates concerning the causes of inter and intra-state conflicts. The increasingly controversial topics of peacekeeping, peace-making and peace enforcement will be reviewed with an eye toward lessons learned. Transnational forces, including non-governmental organizations will be investigated. Finally, the important concept of multilateral diplomacy as a tool used to avoid conflict in the international system will be examined.

GD 541 The Practice of Diplomacy 6 Cr.

This seminar provides an understanding of the methods, institutions and practices that allow nations to translate foreign policy objectives and strategies into practical actions, and how practitioners adjust and refine foreign policy in response to the events that influence outcomes. The course is based on practitioner’s perspective to diplomacy. The emphasis is on foreign policy practices and structures of the United States of America, but the seminar ha broad applicability to the study of the diplomatic practice of other nations that operate in an analogous domestic political environment of a separation of powers, relative openness and freedom of expression.

GD 542 Terrorism: Introduction and State Sponsored Terrorism 6 Cr.

This seminar examines how states have used terrorism as a tool in managing their international rivalries. The seminar also evaluates the actions that the international community takes to deter state-sponsored terrorism. Case studies will be used to complement theory, and to allow for comparative analysis of actions taken by the international community in different cases and circumstances.

GD 544 Global Commerce and the International System 6 Cr.

This seminar evaluates the role of private-sector commerce in the international system. It focuses on examining internal and external environmental conditions when conducting commerce in a global environment; in particular, students will explore the impact of economics, law, politics, and culture on multinational business endeavors. Country specific data and internal organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making in multinational organizations are addressed as well.

GD 546 International Security 6 Cr.

This course surveys some of the major debates and topics in international security. It is designed to give students an understanding of the most important substantive areas in the field of International Security and to tie academic research on security‐related issues to policy. The course will examine both traditional understandings of and approaches to international security. New actors and issues considered relevant since the end of the Cold War will be discussed. The tension between the relative importance of traditional approaches to security, interstate relations, and the relevance or impact of less immediate but important influences such as human security and climate change will also be examined.

GD 547 Cyber Policy I 6 Cr.

This course addresses basic definitions and nomenclature in the area of cyber security assessment, risk analysis derived from actual cases, and issued of cyber privacy and piracy.

GD 548 Studies in Cyber Systems I 6 Cr.

The course navigates sections of classical mathematics and computer science used to construct mathematical models of information security. The course also addresses statistical methods for forensic accounting and assurance, internal controls and financial information systems, and auditing of modern complex accounting information systems.

GD 550 Conflict Resolution & Post-Conflict Reconstruction in the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will examine the “dos” and “don'ts” of negotiating peace, hazards of negotiations and peace settlements, their unexpected consequences, and lessons learned. Of increasing importance is learning how to recover from atrocities through trials, truth commissions, and amnesties. Post-conflict political, economic, and social recoveries are also explored. The seminar also addresses such issues as reestablishing the rule of law, reconstruction of civil society, and of the institutions of governance. Finally, students will examine the politics and cultural impacts of rebuilding, including the economic and financial costs.

GD 552 International Terrorism by Non-State Actors 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the phenomenon of transnational terrorism by non-state actors, that is, by terrorist organizations. Ideology, psychology, and strategies of major transnational groups are addressed to provide an understanding of their long-term goals and operations. Terrorist groups' relationships with WMD proliferation and organized crime are examined, together with possible future trends in terrorist operations. Case studies of key groups will be used to provide comparative analysis.

GD 554 Cross Cultural Management in the International System 6 Cr.

Students will review fundamental topics in human resources management as these pertain to globally active organizations: corporate, not-profit, and governmental. The seminar focuses on building personal skills in dealing with intercultural Human Resources, management differences; selecting, evaluating, and compensating employees in international assignments; training and developing expatriate employees; dealing with culture shock; and examining the effects of repatriation. Students will be asked to apply the concepts of conflict managements, conflict resolution, and conflict avoidance to specific "at-work" situations.

GD 555 Comprehensive Exam 0 Cr.

The Comprehensive exam is a degree completion requirement for all Diplomacy students.

GD 557 Cyber Policy II 6 Cr.

The course introduces social, political and psychological issues in policy implementation as they relate to information security specific policies both in the domestic and international contexts, including the tools and techniques of cyber-attacks that are common to cyber warfare, cyber espionage, cyber terrorism and cyber activism, and efforts to control or mitigate the threat of cyber warfare through diplomacy, arms control treaties and confidence building measures.

GD 558 Studies in Cyber Systems II 6 Cr.

The course navigates sections of classical mathematics and computer science used to construct mathematical models of information security. It discusses the need for mathematical models in different security paradigms along with the essential definitions, concepts and results for developing the models, their strengths and weaknesses, and, consequently, its application to practical problems. The course also addresses statistical methods for forensic accounting and assurance, internal controls and financial information systems, and auditing of modern complex accounting information systems.

GD 560 Military Intervention & Conflict Management in the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will examine conflict in all its forms. Such aspects as covert operations, psychological warfare, special operations, and limited warfare will be introduced. The increased emphasis on multinational coalitions and conflicts will be explored. A renewed emphasis will be given to terrorism, including the use of chemical, biological and nuclear agents. Special cases of civil war and collapsed state conflicts will be reviewed. Finally, the impact of modern warfare, most notably on the environment will be investigated.

GD 561 Human Rights and Conflict in the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will probe the complicated connections between the protection and enforcement of human rights norms and the roots, unfolding, and termination of armed conflicts. Borrowing from the fields of peace-building, conflict resolution, diplomacy, and law, the seminar builds upon the themes of conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction developed in previous seminars by focusing on how human rights abuses make conflicts, especially violent conflicts more likely, and how a respect for the political, civil, economic, and social claims of individuals might repair and restore post-conflict societies.

GD 562 International Response to Transnational Terrorism 6 Cr.

This seminar surveys the strategies and policies used by states to combat transnational terrorism. It includes the development of international law as a tool against terrorism. It focuses on diplomatic and multilateral approaches to deal with cross-border issues, and government policies designed to improve internal and multinational anti-terrorism coordination and cooperation. Differences and commonalities among states in their approaches to terrorism are highlighted in an effort to examine best practices.

GD 564 Global Corporate Diplomacy 6 Cr.

The final seminar in the Commerce concentration addresses the issue of how international commerce depends upon the public goodwill, the development of which is the function of corporate diplomacy. The seminar will enable students to develop knowledge, competencies, and tools for implementing strategic communication in order to deal effectively with international constituencies, including the government, the news media and the Internet, and NGOs. Special emphasis will be laid on developing analytical skills to shape public opinion, build corporate reputation, and deal with crisis in a cross-cultural environment.

GD 567 Diplomacy and Communication 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the role of communication in diplomatic endeavors. The historical influence of communication is considered along with the evolving theoretical basis that has informed diplomatic communication. In addition to examining the role communication has played throughout the history of diplomacy, key challenges related diplomatic communication will be considered. These include cultural challenges, the evolving nature of communication technology, the movement towards transparency, and the development of public diplomacy.

GD 568 Cyber Diplomacy 6 Cr.

This course provides students the opportunity to synthesize learning from all previous seminars and to apply the concepts and principles relevant to the work or career goals of each student. Each student researches and prepares a written capstone project that offers a practical or theoretical solution to challenges or issues of contemporary international importance and relevance in cyber diplomacy. The final outcome of the seminar for each student is a paper suitable for publication in a professional or an academic journal. Students are required to exhibit in-depth critical thinking, analysis, and effective writing skills. Course assignments maximize the exchange of student suggestions and comments on the various stages of the capstone project, to include but not limited to topic section, thesis, resources and supporting information.

GD 570 Thesis Seminar 6 Cr.

In this research course students: identify their research topic, prepare a formal research proposal, identify literature and prepare bibliography, develop a methodological approach, prepare a thesis outline, and start working on chapter drafts. Students whose research projects that deal with human subjects have to familiarize themselves with ethical standards of conduct for scholarly research.

GD 571 Graduate Thesis Research II 6 Cr.

In this graduate research course students: finalize their thesis outline, develop and finalize chapters, prepare the first draft of their thesis, make necessary revisions and prepare the final draft for the examining committee.

GD 575 Exit Portfolio 0 Cr.

The Exit Portfolio is a degree completion requirement for all Master of Arts in Diplomacy students.

GD 579 GR Research Project Exam 0 Cr.

Students’ research projects are examined, if applicable, through written and/or oral examination format. Students make necessary revisions to their final research product, and submit the final copy of their manuscript to the university.

GD 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Executive Leadership Courses

EXL 610 The Science of Self – Leadership Mastery in Real Time 6 Cr.

This seminar introduces the correlation between the neuroscience of Emotional Intelligence and values-based leadership competencies. Specific instruction is given to the dimension of Leading the Self, while introducing the dimensions of Leading Others, Leading Organizations, and Leading in Service; and their associated competencies commonly correlated with successful leaders. Students expand their knowledge and familiarity with the leadership competencies associated with the science of emotional intelligence and strategic communication to more effectively lead the self and successfully engage individuals/organizations in today’s chaotic world. Students develop their understanding and application of social media and technologies to facilitate high-speed communication with their cohort on critical issues and topics developed in real-time, thereby simulating the frequent need to multitask as required in the executive arena in order to practice new skills for competency development.

EXL 620 Leading Complex Change 6 Cr.

This seminar expands student understanding and the application of Emotional Intelligence to Organizational Changes through values-based leadership competencies. Specific instruction is given to the dimensions of Leading Others and Leading Organizations to enhance awareness and capacity as a Transformational Leader. Executive Leaders are responsible for taking organizations to new levels of productivity, market presence, identity, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, and accountability to organizational values and vision. The role of the leader is in fact to lead change. This seminar addresses the processes and considerations for leading complex change initiatives in their own organization. Special attention is given to leveraging human capacity for strategic results.

EXL 630 Lead Beyond Your Organization 6 Cr.

Senior leaders are often involved in navigating political environments within their organization and without, for the purposes of resource acquisition and allocation, political lobbying, maintaining stakeholder relationships, developing strategic alliances and developing partnerships. This seminar addresses the critical success factors all leaders need to master when leveraging informal leadership outside their organization. NOTE: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

EXL 640 Leading With Technology 6 Cr.

In today's world, data analytics is driving an increasing number of decisions and impacting complex business systems. The integration of technology in this decision-making process increases the potential for exposure of sensitive information and intellectual property. This seminar outlines the leadership perspective from which senior leaders must consider these data analyzing tools. NOTE: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

Graduate Independent Study Courses

GU 590 Selected Topics 6 Cr.

This seminar will require a student(s) to make an original, extended, and in-depth study of an approved topic within their field of study and as approved by an appropriate Program Director. This course is used most often in combination with other listed courses where the student has transferred less than six credits. Approval of the Program Director is required to take the course.

GU 599 Pre-Residency Leadership/Disaster Lab 0 Cr.

History Courses

HI 500 Writing Workshop 0 Cr.

This workshop offers students an intensive refresher course in writing fundamentals with a focus on grammar, style, editing and organization. In the second half of this workshop students are introduced to the Chicago Manual of Style system of citation, research and information literacy “best practices” and the various types of assignments and writing required in the field of history. Prerequisites: none.

HI 520 American Colonial, Revolutionary and Early National History 6 Cr.

This seminar explores American history from the era of contact through the early nineteenth century. The seminar is organized on a thematic rather than chronologic basis. It introduces students to the main themes and historiography of the period. Discussions and readings will lead students to examine areas of early seventeenth through early nineteenth-century American history and historiography.

HI 526 Hunter-Gatherer and Agrarian Eras 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the development of human civilization from dawn of human civilization and the development of agriculture to the era of European discovery and colonization of the New World. In addition to examining the forces responsible for the development of human civilization in this period, major historiographic debates, historical themes and problems will be explored.

HI 530 Nineteenth Century American History 6 Cr.

This seminar explores American history from the Early National period to the eve of the First World War. This seminar is organized on a thematic rather than chronologic basis. It introduces students to the major themes and historiographic debates of this period of U.S. history. Discussions and readings will lead students to examine areas of nineteenth-century American history and historiography.

HI 536 The Late Agrarian Era to 1800 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the development of human civilization from the late agrarian era to the beginning of the industrial revolution. In addition to examining the forces responsible for the development of human civilization in the period 1500-1800, major historiographic debates, historical themes and problems will be explored.

HI 540 Twentieth Century American History 6 Cr.

This seminar explores American history from the turn of the twentieth century and focuses on both internal developments and a greater American role in global affairs. It introduces students to main themes and historiography of the period, including the struggle for equality at home for women, immigrants and minorities, increasing American involvement in foreign conflicts, social, political and economic developments, and the relationship with the natural and built environments. Discussions and readings will lead students to examine other areas of twentieth-century American history and historiography.

HI 546 World History from 1800 to 1991 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the development of human civilization from the beginning of the industrial revolution to the end of the Cold War. In addition to examining the major forces shaping world history in this period, major historiographic debates, historical themes and problems will be explored.

HI 550 Directed Readings in History 6 Cr.

This seminar is designed to help students gain a detailed, graduate-level understanding of specific areas or topics in American or Global history and historiography that will prepare students for comprehensive examinations, capstone papers/theses, and teaching. Topics and readings are subject to the approval of the seminar’s supervising faculty members and/or Program Director.

HI 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Info. Security & Assurance Courses

GI 512 Foundations and Historical Underpinnings of Information Assurance 6 Cr.

This seminar explores the historical foundations of information assurance from the early days of mainframes to the foundations of today’s sophisticated networks and distributed computing systems. It examines the earliest thinking about data structures and domains, interoperability between different computing platforms and mechanisms for data transfer and proceeds to the emergence of encryption as a defense against early forms of computer crime. This seminar looks at privacy, policies, and security standards and regulatory requirements. Finally, the seminar addresses the underlying models that define information assurance and takes a first look at IA architecture.

GI 522 Information Assurance Technology 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on the use of technological defenses against threats and exploitations of vulnerabilities in information systems. Topics include physical security measures, access controls, security elements of operating systems, network security measures, anti-malware tools, anti-spam measures, anti-piracy systems, software development methods supporting security, and security certifications for software products.

GI 532 Human Factors and Managing Risk 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on the ways that business objectives, user attitudes and user activities significantly influence both the development of an information assurance program and its successful implementation. The first week focuses on Operations Security and why it is the foundation for an IA program and the key to the program’s effectiveness. The following five weeks explore security awareness as a component of organizational culture: crafting the information assurance message; understanding ethical decision- making as a factor in security; understanding social psychology and how behaviors will influence the effectiveness of security activities; using employment practices and policies to support information security; and creating Acceptable Use and e-mail policies. The final four weeks examine different elements of Risk Management from basic principles through application. The NIST Special Publication 800-30 provides a solid foundation for the risk management issues. Two popular risk assessment processes, and several other processes that help identify risk will be discussed.

GI 542 Information Assurance Management and Analytics 6 Cr.

This seminar is arranged in four general areas beginning with examining and exploring the strategic and gradually narrowing down to the tactical level: Compliance -> Management, Leadership, & Policy Development -> Relationships & Adding Value -> Project Management. The curriculum explores the aspects, methods, and alternatives in information assurance management and compares/utilizes them with respect to non-IT-related management approaches and styles. Additionally, it explores alternatives in building support and consensus for projects and activities and focuses heavily on adding value to the organization. Developing an information assurance marketing plan is examined and is used to help identify techniques of improving the information assurance awareness. Analytics are explored both in terms of metrics and measuring business impact and problem solving and project management techniques and alternatives are included.

GI 551 Computer Forensic Investigations 6 Cr.

This course focuses on the spectrum of tools and techniques used to investigate digital incidents whether in a civil or criminal environment. Information assurance professionals are expected to have a broad understanding of digital incidents, their management, investigation and analysis. This seminar provides that broad understanding and places it in the context of other information assurance domains. These discussions of digital investigation and forensics cover topics from both the technical and management perspectives. This coverage aids the information assurance professional’s understanding and application of domain-specific knowledge.

GI 554 Computer Security Incident Response Team Management 6 Cr.

Students will analyze and apply the key points in creating and managing a computer security incident response team (CSIRT), also sometimes known as a computer incident response team (CIRT) or a computer emergency response team (CERT). Major topics include establishing CSIRTs; responding to computer emergencies; securing the CSIRT; managing the CSIRT with respect to professionalism, setting priorities for triage, and protecting personnel against burnout; and learning from emergencies using the incident postmortem and by establishing continuous process improvement within the organization. Students will use their case study to apply their knowledge to real-world situations and will prepare recommendations for establishment of a new CSIRT or improvement of their existing CSIRT.

GI 556 Cyber Crime 6 Cr.

This course explores the nature of conflict in cyber space focusing on two major internet-based threats to the U.S. national security: cyber terrorism and cyber crime. The course addresses questions like: who is undertaking these cyber activities, what techniques they use, and what countermeasures can be adopted to mitigate their impact. The course is built around a risk management framework to help information leaders leverage the benefits of Internet technologies while minimizing the risks that such technologies pose to their organizations.

GI 557 Cyber Law 6 Cr.

This course explores a broad variety of federal statutory, common, and international laws that may impact the information technology professional. Because the overwhelming majority of cyber infrastructure is owned and operated by the private sector, the course focus is on those laws that affect the interaction between government and the private sector information technology industry, including the privacy rights so often implicated in modern data storage systems. The seminar starts with a look at “cyber law” and whether it is really a distinct legal discipline at all. It then moves into criminal, civil, regulatory, international and common laws with which today’s information technology professional may come in contact. Throughout the course we will discuss how public policy and other factors impact the development, implementation, and interpretation of the law. Students will read, interpret and apply legal authorities and theories, a valuable skill for future information technology leaders if they are to stay in compliance with the ever-growing “cyber” legal framework.

GI 562 Vulnerability Management and Penetration Testing I 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to the penetration testing of computer networks. This is the first of two courses that address Vulnerability Management. The core of this course is the basics of penetration testing. Students utilize a virtual lab to gain experience through hands-on lab exercises. Students learn to use the well-known open-source Metasploit computer security project to understand security vulnerabilities and how to use this tool for penetration testing, testing the control tools and how to conduct monitoring of an enterprise. In the course students are introduced to: system security and vulnerability analysis, the most common system exploits and vulnerabilities, system “pivoting” and client-side exploits. In this seminar students are introduced to open-source tools, in particular, the Metasploit Framework(MSF). Students learn how to assess enterprise security controls and system vulnerability and learn to document their findings. This course is designed for penetration testers, system security and network administrators.

GI 563 Vulnerability Management II 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to advanced open-source tools used to conduct penetration testing of computer networks. This is the second of two courses that address Vulnerability Management. Students learn the rules of engagement, and how to conduct legal and ethical security tests and vulnerability assessments. Students utilize a virtual lab to gain experience through hands-on lab exercises. Students learn to use the well-known open-source tools (Metasploit , John the Ripper, Wireshark) to understand security vulnerabilities and how to use this tool for penetration testing, testing the control tools and how to conduct monitoring of an enterprise. In the course students are introduced to: system security and vulnerability analysis, the most common system exploits and vulnerabilities, system “pivoting” and client-side exploits.

GI 566 Critical Infra. Protection 6 Cr.

This course examines the security of information in computer and communications networks within infrastructure sectors critical to national security. These include the sectors of banking, securities and commodities markets, industrial supply chain, electrical/smart grid, energy, transportation, communications, water supply and health. Special attention is paid to the risk management of information in critical infrastructure environments through an analysis & synthesis of assets, threats, vulnerabilities, impacts, and countermeasures. Critical consideration is paid to the role of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems in the flow of resources such as electric, water, and fuel.

GI 567 International Perspectives on Cyberspace 6 Cr.

This course explores the concept of “cyber” and “cyberspace” from an international perspective. It starts with a look at the technical nature of the internet from its very beginning. It then moves on to explore the various threats facing all nations, including the various threat actors and their motivations, capabilities and intentions. The course then looks at how technical aspects of cyberspace complicate policing and monitoring of activities. Policies, both U.S. and international are explored next, including a look at the prospects for international cooperation. A look at cyberdeterrence and cyberwar follows, as well as a more detailed look into the cyber policies and activities of certain state and non-state actors.

GI 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Justice Administration Courses

GJ 522 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice: Ethical Leadership and Technology 6 Cr.

TThis course focuses on the nexus and relationships among leadership, ethics, and emerging technology for criminal justice practitioners, managers and administrators. The multifaceted responsibilities of criminal justice professionals require basic knowledge of these focused competency based areas as well as of the symbiotic relationships which lead to successful policies, procedures, and practices in contemporary criminal justice organizations. Emerging technologies such as drone usage, body cameras and enhanced listening devices are explored in the context of ethical use in police interdiction and intervention.

GJ 551 Law Enforcement Administration 6 Cr.

This course examines law enforcement best practices, police leadership, workforce development, accountability, internal affairs, productivity, and managing special units. Students will also study the role of community policy, community policing, restorative justice programs, crime prevention, and the role of technology, integrated justice systems, and information system security.

GJ 552 Corrections Administration 6 Cr.

This course examines administration in the corrections environment. Topics include personnel management, budgeting and public finance, workforce development, staffing, special units, correctional policy development and planning, The role of technology and integrated justice systems are examined, as well as information system security.

GJ 556 Critical Incident Management for Public Safety 6 Cr.

This course explores public administration within the scope of critical incidents and crisis management. Among the topics to be studied are domestic terrorism and counterterrorism, the roles of the National Incident Management System and the National Response Framework, best practices for first responders, and constitutional issues related to the execution of first responder duties. Students will also study the use of specially trained and equipped units such as SWAT teams, and the role of community policing and community partnerships in responding to crises, whether manmade or natural. Prerequisites: Completion of all prior core courses in seminars one, two and three or permission of the program director.

GJ 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Leadership Courses

OL 510 Leadership Fundamentals 6 Cr.

This course focuses on differentiating the conceptual and theoretical aspects and models of leadership and leadership studies in order for students to apply leadership skills and principles to their place of work. The fundamentals of leadership are taught within the context of present and past leaders with an emphasis on how to live out these fundamentals in an ethical manner.

OL 520 Emotional Intelligence 6 Cr.

This course provides information about the new way of evaluating intelligence in individuals. This new measure of intelligence is called EQ or emotional intelligence. Students are given the opportunities and tools to evaluate their capacity to think about work through the lens of reflection and introspection as a guide to understanding the behavioral aspects of working together and providing customer service. By examining thinking patterns students will take away new skills in developing intuitive reasoning to enhance professional interpersonal relationships with peers and customers.

OL 530 Leading Change in Organizations 6 Cr.

A leader’s ability to understand and follow the change management process in a collaborative manner is a vital skill to master. This seminar focuses on the strategic leadership of change in organizations. Students learn about change from a leadership as well as a management perspective in organizations, national and multinational. This broad-based seminar differentiates the conceptual and theoretical change models in order to assist the student in understanding the best ways to lead and manage change. Students learn the importance of understanding and following the change management process in a collaborative manner. The seminar helps students learn about and practice leadership skills that foster positive changes in people and organizations.

OL 540 Strategic Communication and Information Leadership 6 Cr.

Strategic communication is a vital skill in today’s demanding, fast-paced, virtual or global workplaces. This course requires students to identify a personal leadership style, tendencies and preferences as a professional, and how one assimilates and applies information. Experiential learning is a large component of this course as students practice their skills at work and relay their experiences through a Leadership Development Portfolio (LDP).

OL 541 Hospitality Leadership Strategies 6 Cr.

This course introduces leadership practices and strategies in the expanding hospitality industry. The core of the course is the study of best practices for hospitality leadership, including the challenges of providing exceptional service with limited resources and changes to the global marketplace. Students study different types of industry best practices, focusing on internal and external stakeholder relationships, and forming strategic directions to ensure success in a chosen type of organization.

OL 542 Human Resources Leadership 6 Cr.

The focus of this seminar is on the history and evolution of human resources leadership, current trends and future needs regarding various leadership strategies utilized within a broad range of organizations. The seminar will examine the impact such factors as globalization, technology, and worker diversity have on achieving the work/life balance needs and capabilities required by organizations and individuals. The seminar also explores the role of the leader in growing its people within the organizational context to develop a value based culture capable of achieving strategic goals and objectives. Through the discussion and understanding of human resource leadership principles and personal reflection and integration, the student will gain the ability to help design, develop and construct worker based strategies at an executive level while concurrently helping workers grow and develop as individuals.

OL 543 Theories and Innovative Practices of Public Sector/Government/Military Leadership 6 Cr.

This course addresses the dynamic economic, social, and cultural transformations faced by contemporary public sector/government/military leaders as they strengthen agencies for tomorrow’s challenges. Combining the latest leadership theories of public sector/government/military leadership with the most effective lessons from the private sector, students will gain theoretical frameworks and practical tools to effectively improve and enhance their skills to manage complex systems, influence organizational context, engage stakeholders, and shape institutional culture. The topics covered include: history and theories of successful public sector/government/military management; contemporary leadership strategies; and innovative response to public sector challenges in a growing global marketplace.

OL 544 Change Management Consulting 6 Cr.

There are two foci for this seminar. The first is on providing students with the theoretical knowledge and foundation on consulting models and methodologies. The second is on providing students with the tips, tools and techniques to be a successful change management consultant.

OL 550 Strategic Organizational Behavior 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on strategic organizational behavior in organizations. Students learn about the importance of strategic alignment in order to enable effective organizational behavior. Systems thinking and organizational behavior provide a framework that the student can use both to analyze and influence the behavior of individuals and groups within the organization. This broad-based seminar analyzes and applies various holistic strategic organizational behavior models in order to assist the student in understanding the best ways to assess and impact the strategic alignment of organizations. Students learn the importance of a leader’s ability to understand and use various organizational behavior and organizational strategy models. The seminar helps students learn about and practice leadership skills that foster strategic alignment and effective behavior in people and organizations.

OL 551 Hospitality Management Systems: Leveraging Capacity in Service Organizations 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on various management systems utilized within the hospitality industry to leverage capacity to expand services via human resources and innovative knowledge management. This course introduces students to hospitality management systems and the strategies used to create an adaptive, dynamic and customer-focused hospitality organization. The course examines management tools and tactics geared to improve customer loyalty, employee satisfaction and revenue management. The core of the course is the study of best practices for hospitality management systems, and the science behind the correct utility of those systems.

OL 552 Leveraging Human Capacity for Strategic Results 6 Cr.

The focus of this seminar is on various management systems and best organizational practices to leverage human capacity to achieve strategic goals. The seminar studies how maximized utilization of human capital has become the centerpiece for success in an increasingly complex world, and how human resource leaders must confront ambitious goals while balancing a volatile economic market, environmental and legal risks, advancements in technology and workforce needs evolving at an increasingly rapid pace. The seminar will also explore various measurement tools for assessment of the efficiency and effectiveness of management systems methods for developing a blueprint for executing strategic objectives. This seminar builds on the Human Resource Leadership seminar, which was focused on developing a leadership strategy that successfully supports management systems that leverage human capacity for organizations.

OL 553 Influence in the Public Sector/Government/Military: Collaborating Across Organizational Lines 6 Cr.

This course addresses challenges faced by public sector/government/military leadership in developing collaborative relationships spanning across agency borders. Managing adaptation to changing environments and successfully dealing with multi-faceted variables using planning and control strategies, students will learn new people management strategies, implementing fundamentals of strategic and performance management, by leading effective change initiatives within an organization, and fostering teamwork by creating a work culture that values collaboration. The topics covered include: creating operational synergy, and managing internal and external stakeholder relationships to promote information sharing and create collaborative partnerships.

OL 554 Implementing Organizational Change 6 Cr.

The focus of this seminar is on moving from the theoretical realm to the practical application of implementing change initiatives. Students are presented with real-world case studies of successful and unsuccessful change management initiatives. Students analyze and synthesize cases to determine what worked and what did not work.

OL 560 Strategic Organizational Leadership & Developing a Learning Organization 6 Cr.

Students apply principles of Leading Change, Strategic Organizational Behavior and Strategic Leadership to people and organizations to impact performance and ensure future success. This seminar develops an understanding of the implications of strategic alignment and organizational learning to the organization’s success. It differentiates conceptual and theoretical change models to assist students in understanding the best ways to lead change and foster a learning organization while considering individual and group behavior as tied to strategy. The seminar demonstrates how strategic leadership, organizational behavior, and change theories are applied in a collaborative manner and will lead to aligning stakeholder’s interest. Prerequisites: OL530 and OL550 or permission of the program director.

OL 561 Capstone Studies 6 Cr.

This course in capstone studies provides students the opportunity to synthesize learning from all previous seminars and to apply the concepts and principles in two ways: the preparation of a written capstone project that offers a practical or theoretical solution to an organizational challenge or issue of contemporary importance and relevance to the work or career goals of each student; and a 1500- word paper suitable for publication in a professional journal. Students will be required to exhibit indepth critical thinking, organizational analysis, and effective writing. Course assignments will maximize the exchange of student suggestions and comments on the various stages of the capstone project, to include but not limited to topic section, thesis, resources and supporting information. Prerequisites: Completion of all prior required core and concentration courses, or permission of the program director.

OL 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Military History Courses

MH 510 Introduction to Military History: Historiography and Method 6 Cr.

The first seminar examines how military history developed as a distinct discipline, and will train you in the "tools of the trade": historiography and methodology. Historiography, or the art of practicing history as a distinct discipline, is an examination of the history of historical thought, from the first works of history in the classical world to the present time. The seminar will cover some of the varied historiographical schools and concepts that have evolved. Historical methodology and informational literacy will also be studied. How do historians gather information and formulate hypotheses? The development of research methods, including the use of primary and secondary sources, are discussed. History involves interpretation; the role of objectivity, selectivity, and bias are examined.

MH 520 Global Military History to 1800 6 Cr.

This seminar explores the military history of the United States and Europe from classical Greece to the 19th century. The emphasis is on the "Western Way of War" as defined by historians Geoffrey Parker and Victor Davis Hanson. In virtually every conflict between Western states and non-Western powers, from the Persian Wars through the colonial era, the west has emerged victorious. Are there experiences and characteristics that have distinguished warfare in the West from the rest of the world? Other prominent military historians, including John Lynn, have challenged the notion that a distinct, continuous Western Way of War exists. The seminar consists of an in-depth examination of these conflicting interpretations of military history and the major themes in the military history of the West.

MH 530 Military Thought and Theory 6 Cr.

This seminar studies the most influential military theoreticians and strategists from the period of the Thirty Years War to the present day. Students will examine the theories of Clausewitz, Jomini, Douhet, Mahan, Corbett, and Mao Tse-Tung. This seminar also examines theories of deterrence and nuclear war as well as post-Maoist revolutionary warfare.

MH 540 Non-Western Military History 6 Cr.

This seminar will present an introduction to Non-Western military history, covering a wide range of topics including military thought, strategy and tactics, technologies, and cultural factors as they pertained to the waging of war. Non-Western military history is rapidly maturing as a field of scholarly inquiry, particularly with respect to Asia. Therefore, this seminar will introduce students to the latest scholarship and interpretations, which both challenge and complement aspects of the debates about Western superiority mentioned above. Due to the wider availability of source materials and the research expertise of the seminar designer, this seminar will devote more attention to East Asia than to other parts of the non-Western world. Nevertheless, weekly lessons will be arranged topically and will in many cases encompass a variety of geographical areas. Students will be strongly encouraged to think comparatively throughout the class. Students will be challenged to determine if any society had definitely unique approaches to warfare or if the universals are far more important than the specifics.

MH 541 Chinese Military History 6 Cr.

This seminar will provide an introduction to Chinese military history, covering a wide range of topics including military thought, strategy and tactics, technologies, and cultural factors as they pertained to the waging of war. This offering will introduce students to the latest scholarship and interpretations, which both challenge and complement aspects of the debates about the “Western way of war.” Students will be strongly encouraged to think comparatively throughout the class. In the process we will attempt to determine if any society had definitely unique approaches to warfare or if the universals are far more important than the specifics.

MH 543 Amphibious Warfare 6 Cr.

This seminar examines amphibious operations from antiquity to the present. It also sketches broader contexts for amphibious warfare as it has affected political, diplomatic, and economic change by determining to what degree, if at all, various amphibious actions figured in what has been labeled as an early-modern “military revolution” that contributed to the “Rise of the West.”.

MH 550 U.S. Military History 6 Cr.

This seminar will present an introduction to American military history from the colonial era to the present. Students will be challenged to critically evaluate Russell Weigley's "American Way of War" thesis and examine the impact American conflicts and the U.S. military has had an American Society.

MH 551 Race and Gender in Military History 6 Cr.

This seminar will cover the complex issues surrounding racial integration in military institutions, including intriguing questions around citizenship and ethnicity. Students will also examine the history of women's participation in warfare and issues of gender integration in the military.

MH 552 Total War 6 Cr.

This seminar will examine the origins of the concept and practice of “total war” in the period from the French Revolution to the end of the Cold War. The French Revolution, Napoleonic Wars, American Civil War, First World War and Second World War will be examined. Students will examine the evolution of modern war, the characteristics of “total war” as well as the usefulness of the concept of “total war” in describing these massive conflicts.

MH 553 Dir Readings Military History 6 Cr.

This seminar is designed to help students gain a detailed, graduate level understanding of specific areas or topics in military history and historiography that will prepare students for comprehensive examinations, capstone papers/thesis projects and for teaching. Topics and readings are subject to the approval of the seminar's supervising faculty members and/or Program Director.

MH 562 Capstone Paper 6 Cr.

Norwich requires a "Capstone Paper" that must be written and submitted during the latter part of Seminar 6. The Capstone has all the elements of the traditional thesis, including a program-approved topic of the student's own choosing to be explored in depth, the use of appropriate academic sources.

MH 569 Comprehensive Exam 0 Cr.

This degree completion exercise is designed to assess students’ knowledge of military history in general and the specific sub-fields they have studied during their program of study. The goal of the written examination is to assess student knowledge in the field of military history gained during the students’ program of study. In each examination students must demonstrate graduate level knowledge of the pertinent historiography of the field(s) examined in their course of study, graduate level analysis, an ability to synthesize information from various scholarly sources and develop and defend their interpretation of historical events. Students must also make a credible case regarding their argument’s historical and historiographic significance. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Seminars 1-6. Additional fees may apply.

MH 570 M.A. Thesis 6 Cr.

The M.A. thesis is an original research project demonstrating the student’s ability to conduct primary source research and mastery of the historiography germane to the research question. The thesis must also demonstrate graduate level analysis, synthesis, and argument and make a compelling case for the argument’s historical and historiographic significance. The M.A. thesis will require students to make an individual, original, extended, and in- depth study of an approved research question within the field of military history. The M.A. thesis requires research utilizing primary documents. Students pursuing a research question requiring primary and/or secondary sources in a foreign language must demonstrate advanced reading proficiency in the pertinent foreign language(s). Proficiency will be demonstrated via an external assessment such as the Defense Language Proficiency Examinations, Foreign Service Institute examinations or reading comprehension tests approved by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. If required for the research project, proof of foreign language competency must accompany the petition for the thesis option. Thesis and additional fees will be applied. Prerequisites: approval of Program Director, Associate Program Director for Academics and Capstone Director, successful completion of Seminars 1-5, and, if applicable, advanced reading knowledge of the pertinent foreign language(s).

MH 595 Residency 0 Cr.

MH 697 Staff Ride 0 Cr.

Nursing Courses

NR 510 Health Systems Analysis Policy, Environment, and Structure 6 Cr.

This seminar presents a global perspective of the healthcare system. Content includes an historical overview of healthcare systems in the United States, issues of cost, quality and access, as well as trends, such as, cultural diversity, demographic shifts, economics, technological influences and ethical issues impacting health care delivery. The student will gain the essential understanding of the continuum of care and examine the impact of integrated delivery systems on care delivery processes and patient outcomes.

NR 512 Advanced Nursing Care in the Delivery of Healthcare 6 Cr.

This seminar represents the foundation of graduate level nursing education. It provides a global perspective of the healthcare system and helps the student assess and analyze the healthcare system as the context for graduate level nursing practice. The relationship among various stakeholders including consumers, providers, regulatory agencies and policy makers are explored as well as their impact on healthcare delivery. This seminar also emphasis health policy and advocacy, interprofessional collaboration, and clinical prevention and population health. Analysis of the advanced nursing role is conducted within the context of the healthcare system in relationship with complex social, economic, technological, legal, ethical and political environments.

NR 520 Theoretical Constructs for Leadership Roles in Nursing 6 Cr.

This seminar prepares the student with the theoretical foundation to function in management level nursing roles across a variety of nursing specialties and health care settings. The student will be prepared to understand, evaluate, and utilize appropriate theories within his/her own practice. Theoretical constructs will include nursing and other relevant theories from the social, organizational, and behavioral sciences. Specific theories addressed include: systems, change, nursing management, and leadership theories, as well as ethical principles in health care and professional role development. Theoretical concepts are augmented by individual projects that require the student to examine his/her practice setting using the above constructs.

NR 522 Translating and Integrating Scholarship into Practice 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the application and integration of evidence in leadership roles and decision making. The student explores nursing and other relevant theories from the social, organizational, and behavioral sciences to provide a theoretical foundation for evidence-based practice. The student is equipped to critically appraise and utilize research, identify researchable problems within his/her practice setting, and lead teams toward integration of evidence-based practice in healthcare. Translational science and implementation/improvement science is introduced. The seminar concludes with a brief overview of innovation and its relevance to advanced nursing roles. The student participates in a mentored practicum of 100 hours. This practicum experience provides the student with an opportunity to apply and integrate relevant evidence in their practice and develop reflective practices and appreciative inquiry. Prerequisite: NR 512.

NR 530 Evidence-Based Practice 6 Cr.

This seminar prepares the student to become proficient in the utilization of research, the critical evaluation of research, identification of researchable problems within a variety of practice settings, and the application of research to clinical problems. The course incorporates both quantitative and qualitative research methods, application of statistical analysis of data, the utilization of information systems for accessing, storing and analyzing data, identification of researchable clinical problems, critical analysis and application of existing research, and application of theoretical constructs to frame a research proposal. Class assignments related to evidence based practice are augmented as the student identifies a researchable nursing problem within his/her own practice setting and develops a related research proposal.

NR 531 Clinical Concepts: Advanced Pathophysiology 3 Cr.

This seminar may be taken at any point during the latter half of the Master’s program, either concurrently with one of the other seminars or after completion of the 6-seminar concentration. It will satisfy the requirements of some states (e.g., Texas and California) that stipulate advanced coursework in pharmacology, pathophysiology, and health assessment for nurse educators. The course will focus on the pathophysiology, assessment, and evidence based interventions of select acute and chronic conditions across the lifespan. This course will expand on undergraduate level knowledge of disease entities commonly found in patient populations cared for by students.

NR 532 Quality Improvement, Informatics & Healthcare Technologies 6 Cr.

This seminar introduces the student to the fundamentals of quality improvement science, and the use, implementation and impact of informatics and healthcare technologies on quality and safety in healthcare. Students examine quality improvement models in the delivery of healthcare and measures for quality improvement initiatives. The business case for quality is discussed as well as leadership and teambuilding for quality improvement in a continuous learning organization. The student conducts a microsystem analysis and prepares a performance improvement project proposal. The student participates in a mentored practicum of 100 hours. This practicum experience provides the student with the opportunity to conduct a clinical microsystem analysis, participate in a quality improvement project and develop reflective practices and appreciative inquiry. Prerequisites: NR 512 and NR 522.

NR 540 The Heath Care Organization: Behavior and Development 6 Cr.

This seminar prepares the student to incorporate systems theory as a basis of understanding the impact of market forces on health care delivery. Course content includes theories of leadership and organizational behavior, design and culture as well as group dynamics (i.e., communication, conflict, negotiation). In addition,, concepts which focus on governance, decision making, performance improvement will be discussed. Class work is augmented by case studies and individual project work that require the students to examine practices in their own organizations.

NR 541 Clinical Concepts: Advanced Pharmacology 3 Cr.

This seminar focuses on clinical applications of pharmacotherapeutic agents used in the care of patients. The seminar content is designed to build on prior pharmacological study of actions and effects of drugs on the human system across life span. Students will study pharmacologic mechanisms of action, effects on organ systems, routes of administration, pharmacokinetics, therapeutic uses, considerations related to age and physiological state, adverse reactions, contracindications, and regulatory issues related to nursing education practice.

NR 542 Clinical Concepts: Advanced Health Assessment 3 Cr.

This seminar will focus on advanced clinical history taking and physical assessment for patients across the lifespan, Course content focuses on concepts, theory and practice of comprehensives health histories and assessments for patients of all ages and states of health. Both components will require a comprehensive examination: a proctored paper and pencil exam for pharmacology and a videotaped health assessment demonstration for the latter portion of the seminar.

NR 543 ClinicalConcepts:ADV Pathophys 4 Cr.

This seminar examines pathophysiological processes integral to the understanding of human health conditions and disorders of children and adults. Objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptation are assessed and analyzed. Assessment findings, diagnostic testing, and interventions for specific health problems are discussed. Pharmacologic treatments for specific health problems are explored. The etiology, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of disorders are reviewed within the context of age and gender. Principles of pathophysiology are applied to recognize clinical signs and symptoms consistent with human health conditions and disorders during case study presentations and discussions. The impact of health promotion and disease prevention on pathophysiological processes across the lifespan are explored. This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

NR 550 Nursing Resource Management 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on the critical aspects of human and financial resource management. Human resource management including hiring practices, disciplinary action, and performance appraisal and performance improvement are examined in this seminar. Healthcare finance incorporating nursing unit based budget preparation, management control systems, and operations management are addressed. In addition, quality improvement, risk management and marketing are explored in this seminar. The student is expected to utilize his/her workplace environment for the exploration, development and application of the course objectives.

NR 551 Theoretical Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction 6 Cr.

This seminar prepares students to apply theoretical concepts related to education and nursing to the development and implementation of curricula. Topics will include history of curriculum in nursing, theories of teaching and learning, instructional design theory and method, technology in education, learner diversity, and curriculum development, A precepted practicum experience will coincide with didactic coursework. Students will choose a preceptor in an educational role who can facilitate role development and the implementation of the students’ work. Students will be required to develop a curriculum for a course or unit of study and implement a portion of the course or program using technology. Student work will become part of the student’s portfolio and shared with peers in the electronic classroom.

NR 560 Strategic Management in the Nursing Environment 6 Cr.

This seminar is the capstone course in the Master of Science in Nursing-concentration in Nursing Administration. The seminar consists of two integrated components: 1) online-classes, consisting of study and discussions related to the development of a learning contract, concepts related to strategic management and professional practice; 2) a 60-hour, self-directed administrative practicum to implement the learning contract objectives. Discussions will relate to the acquisition of the necessary tools for successful practice as a Master’s prepared nurse administrator. This culminating experience is designed to enable students to apply the knowledge and skills learned throughout the graduate program and to guide their future career goals.

NR 561 Scholarship of Teaching, Learning, and Evaluation 6 Cr.

This seminar prepares students to measure and assess learners in a variety of nursing contexts (e.g., clinical evaluation, via simulation) as well as evaluate curriculum on the program level. Foundations of educational measurement and evaluation , learner assessment, objective development, the evaluation of critical thinking as well as the context of nursing education will be discussed. Students will take part in a concurrent precepted practicum in which they will be required to engage in clinical education and evaluation of learners, as well as the development of assessment strategies for previously developed curriculum. Students will have an opportunity to reflect on the multiple roles of the nurse educator in practice. Prerequisites: completion of NR 510, 520, 530, 541, 551, and national certification in an area of specialty nursing practice, or permission of the Program Director.

NR 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Public Administration Courses

AD 511 Foundations of Public Administration and Policy 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to public administration in the United States. The course focuses on governance, inter-governmental relationships, organizational theory, policies, and strategic planning as affected by fiscal constraints, public needs, social change and politics. Students are introduced to the role of leadership, the necessity for professional ethics and accountability, and personal competence. Students also begin the program-long requirement of developing their skills of critical analysis, research, integration of information, and effective writing.

AD 521 Public Administration Research and Analysis 6 Cr.

This course reviews major research method designs and their application to policy development and evaluation. Students are also exposed to statistical techniques commonly found in public administration and social science research from the perspective of managerial control and application to evaluation of research design/program evaluation. Particular focus is placed on quality assurance and best- evidence management.

AD 531 Public Organization Resources & Processes 6 Cr.

This course explores three areas of public administration; the legal environment for the public organization, human resources, and organizational leadership. The first part of the course focuses on creating agency authority, public participation, civil liability, employment law, and due process. The second part of the course focuses on selecting and retaining quality employees and managers, evaluations, coaching and training. The third part of the course focuses on strategic leadership, organizational analysis and culture, managing conflict, and organizational vision and change.

AD 542 Leading the Nonprofit Organization 6 Cr.

This course explores the broad scope of leadership responsibilities challenging senior leaders within the nonprofit sector. Among the topics to be studied are strategic planning, fundraising, stakeholder engagement, governance, marketing, and performance management. Students will also examine trends in social entrepreneurship and the use of technology, such as social media, that are transforming the field. The course focuses on developing flexible leadership skills that can be applied in a variety of settings, across the life cycle of both small and large scale nonprofit organizations.

AD 543 Municipal Governance 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to the work of local government managers in the United States. The core of the course is the study of best practices for municipal leadership, including the challenges of providing direction to a wide scope of departments and agencies necessary to serve the needs of communities. Students will also study how to create and maintain intergovernmental relationships and form partnerships with elected officials, staff employees such as directors, managers, and department heads, private sector businesses, bargaining units, citizens and representatives of the media.

AD 544 Strategies and Principles for Sustainability I 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to the principles and strategies of sustainability as it applies to public works services in the community. Specifically, the course will present students with a study of: 1) The connections between the environment and mankind, 2) How air and water pollution affect public health, 3) The impact to the economy when water and transportation policies are not well thought out, 4) The importance of using long-term economic models in public policy decision making, 5) Learning how to think in a holistic manner, 6) The attributes of a sustainable work culture, and 7) How to build community support for a sustainable program.

AD 545 Policy, Politics, and Planning 6 Cr.

This introduced students to the impact of politics on the policy-making process, the basics of policy analysis, and the interdependence of public policy and planning. The course applies basic methods for analyzing and resolving planning and policy issues. Using the lab, students start with Excel and simple analysis and move to SPSS. Exposure to research methods and techniques will ensure that all students understand the basics of the impact of politics on policy and planning, and principles of applying these two basic tools.

AD 552 Nonprofit Administration 6 Cr.

This course of study focuses on the administration and management of tax-exempt organizations that derive their funding and mandates from individuals, foundations, and governmental sources. Topics include the legal framework of nonprofit organizations, organizational design, fiscal management, fundraising, grants, contracts, assessment and planning. Students will study best practices for leadership and management, nonprofit governance, and the effective use of volunteers. Finally, students will review the role of technology with special attention to information integration and assurance.

AD 553 Rural Municipal Governance 6 Cr.

This graduate level course explores the role of the public service leader, divisions and sectors within the rural municipality, organizing stakeholder collaborations and developing an action plan in support of accountability, good governance, and improvement of quality of life. Specifically, discussions will examine interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary cultural competence and effective leadership skills uniquely identified in rural communities as well as exploration of key issues affecting education, economic development, water supply, sewer systems, internet and broadband access, housing, health care access, and mental health status of those living in rural counties and towns.

AD 554 Principles and Strategies for Sustainability 6 Cr.

AD 555 Public Organization Fiscal Management, Part I 6 Cr.

This course explores in greater depths methods of policy analysis, looking at crosscutting research strategies, identifying and gathering data, data analysis, establishing evaluation criteria, and identifying alternatives. Some of the basic elements of chi-square test, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals, projections techniques versus causal prediction, and methods of projection analysis of historical data are examined.

AD 557 Public Works Administration, Part I 6 Cr.

This course of study focuses on the local, state, regional, and national legal, political, technological, and operational issues key to public works administration in the areas of public utilities, water resources, transportation, facilities and structures, and parks and grounds. Topics include the historical development of, and technological advances in, public works management; the public works policy-making process and current public works policy; internal and external communication challenges; public affairs, enforcement, and emergency management roles of public works officials.

AD 558 Fiscal Management Accounting & Contracting 6 Cr.

This course explores the legal and regulatory foundation for financial reporting and accountability for public organizations. Topics include development of transactions, enactment of appropriations, and incurrence of obligations or encumbrances. Other topics include financial reporting, analysis of governmental financial performance, costing of government services, and auditing of governmental organizations. For course readings students are provided current study guides published by the Association of Government Accountants’ Certified Government Financial Manager, designed specifically to prepare professionals and students for the CGFM certification examination.

AD 559 Fiscal Management Finance/Tax & Budgeting 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to four major areas of financial concern: Preparation of budgets; creating management strategies for the organization based on the principles of strategic financial management; obtaining financial resources from issuing bonds and levying taxes; and managing cash and employee retirement funds. Students will also examine contemporary perspectives on professional ethics and ethical behavior by leaders in the public sector especially in regards to their fiduciary responsibility in investing and managing public funds.

AD 561 Capstone Studies 6 Cr.

The core course in capstone studies provides students the opportunity to synthesize learning from all previous seminars and to apply the concepts and principles in two ways: the preparation of a written capstone project that offers a practical or theoretical solution to a program, operation, policy, problem or issue of contemporary importance and relevance to the work or career goals of each student; and a 1500-word paper suitable for publication in a professional journal. Students will be required to exhibit in-depth critical thinking, policy analysis, and effective writing. Course assignments will maximize the exchange of student suggestions and comments on the various stages of the capstone project, to include but not limited to topic section, thesis, resources and supporting information. Prerequisites: Completion of all prior required core and concentration/elective courses, or permission of the program director.

AD 562 Transformational Organizational Culture, Human Resources Devel and Mngt in NonProfit Organizations 6 Cr.

This course addresses nonprofit organization professional and volunteer staff management, nonprofit law, ethics, and risk management, leadership and governance excellence in nonprofit organizations. The course concentrates heavily on competencies and knowledge, skills, and abilities needed by senior managers with major responsibilities for human resource development and management, board and committee development, volunteer resource management, ethics and ethical behavior, organizational core values, diversity awareness and legal and risk management.

AD 563 Urban Municipal Governance 6 Cr.

This graduate level course introduces students to the public administrator in their role as an elected public service leader committed to identifying, examining, and working collaboratively toward effectively improving municipal services and the quality of life for constituents living in urban America. Particular focus will be placed on multidisciplinary collaborations and action plan development, through discussions and reflections of key issues including the unique needs affecting public safety, emergency management, medical services, animal control, and public and mental health concerns. In addition, discussions will further examine the public administrator’s responsibilities surrounding civic engagement, waste-water, storm water, street maintenance, solid waste collection and disposal, forestry, parks and recreation.

AD 564 International Development and Influence I 6 Cr.

This course focuses on world politics and the historical background of U.S. efforts to foster development in developing countries, foreign policy and levels of analysis, nationalism and globalization (which includes transportation, communications, economic and cultural factors). Transnationalism, with a focus on nongovernmental organizations (NGO’s), religious power, and the women’s movement will be explored. Particular focus will be placed on power, international diplomacy and how states are governed.

AD 565 Public Organization Fiscal Management, Part II 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the formulation of policy, the iterative process, the complexity of joint theories and the relationship between policy, implementation, planning and design. It examines policy formulation, explaining behavior, forecasting effects, policy adoption and evaluation of policy.

AD 567 Public Works Administration, Part II 6 Cr.

This course of study focuses on local, state, regional, and national master public works planning, contract administration and project management; multi-year financing of public works projects; environmental impacts and other cost-benefit analyses, and decision-making modeling; multi-jurisdictional services and public-private joint ventures; and, trends and future challenges.

AD 572 Resource Development, Management & Efficiency by Nonprofit Organizations 6 Cr.

This course focuses heavily on competencies and knowledge, skills, and abilities needed by senior managers with major responsibilities in such areas as: financial management, accounting, and economics, fundraising, grant writing, mission-focused information technology and knowledge management for nonprofit organizations. Course objectives and learning outcomes emphasize professional and managerial competencies associated with efficient, resource conservative nonprofits, including: Revenue/Resource Development: Fund-Raising and Grantsmanship; Nonprofit Accountability and Economics; Financial Management and Accounting; Performance/Results Measurement, Analysis, Improvement; Information Technology and Management; and, Knowledge Management.

AD 574 International Development and Influence 6 Cr.

This course builds on the concepts presented in AD564 International Development I. Students will continue to explore world conditions relevant to international development and influence. In addition to those covered in AD564, conditions explored in this course include the history and roles of intergovernmental organizations, the United Nations, the European Union, international law and human rights. Security issues such as the causes of war, terrorism, unconventional and conventional force, weapons of mass destruction, and global and international security concerns will also be discussed. Finally, the course will examine theories of international political economy, environmental concerns and international cooperation.

AD 575 Tools for Policy Analysis 6 Cr.

This seminar examines and uses the key concepts, tools, and techniques used in scientific research, design, implementation, and evaluation. It examines various methods needed in order to present data using techniques such as SPSS, SAS, R, and Python.

AD 576 Foundations of Leadership and Ethical Decision Making 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of management and leadership in public administration. The course explores major models of leadership from a theoretical, ethical, and practical perspective. Students in this course will gain an understanding of major leadership theories by examining the basis of each theory, evaluating their strengths and weaknesses, and learning how to apply the theory to practical situations in public administration and nonprofit settings. These activities enable students to reflect on how they perceive leadership from both a subordinate and leadership perspective. By the end of this seminar, students will have developed a thorough understanding of leadership concepts, and will be able to apply them in their own leadership situations.

AD 582 Healthcare Management 6 Cr.

The course provides learners with managerial competencies – aggregated knowledge, skills and abilities – associated with quality management of healthcare nonprofit organizations. The learning outcomes emphasize competencies outlined and highlighted in the Healthcare Leadership Competency Model and the CPHQ Examination. AD 582 addresses all of the competencies outlined in the NCHL Health Leadership model, including: transformation, execution, and people. The seminar is designed to fully prepare the learner to successfully complete requirements for the professional certification of Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality. Among the main themes of the course are the following: organizational administration of health care facilities, financial management in health care, strategies and methodologies for effective health care planning, information systems planning and management in health care, health care economics, quality management in health care organizations, health care leadership, communications and marketing in the healthcare environment, healthcare quality management, including assessment tools and models and program improvement processes, knowledge and information management, human resource management in healthcare organizations, legal and regulatory issues and policies, and, professional ethics.

AD 585 Economics & Decision Making 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to finance and economic theories, and explains how these concepts are utilized in public sector decision making. The core of the course is the study of best practices for financial, economic, and decisive leadership, including the challenges of providing such direction to a wide scope of departments and agencies. Students evaluate key financial, economic, and decision making principles and strategies. This understanding equips public sector leaders to make decisions based on rational analysis, as well as allows for thoughtful consideration of financial issues pertaining to the current state of the economy, both domestic and global. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

AD 586 Public Leadership, Crisis Management, and Organizational Change 6 Cr.

This course explores the role of leadership in public organizations by examining how leadership is intrinsically tied to the organization. Students will gain an understanding of how effective leaders articulate their leadership philosophy, how they embody the ideals and values of the organization, and how they motivate and reward their subordinates. The course also examines the role of leadership in crisis situations including how decisions are made and implemented, how information is communicated in critical situations, how political leaders are held accountable for crisis situations, and how communities can be returned to a state of normalcy after a critical incident has occurred.

AD 590 MPA Portfolio 0 Cr.

The Portfolio is a required element of the MPA Degree Program. Students submit the final graded assignment from each of the first five seminars for evaluation of overall growth and improvement throughout the course of the MPA degree program.

AD 595 Residency 0 Cr.