Course Descriptions (online courses only)

Courses numbered 500 and above are graduate courses.

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Accounting Courses

ACCT 350 Financial Accounting 3 Cr.

This course provides successful students with a basic understanding of financial accounting concepts, the double-entry bookkeeping system, the accounting cycle, and general-purpose financial statements. Basic knowledge of accounting for merchandising operations, short-term liquid assets; inventories; property, plant, and equipment; short- and long-term liabilities; and revenues and expenses are also developed.

ACCT 351 Managerial Accounting 3 Cr.

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the principles, techniques, and uses of accounting in the planning and control of a business organization from a management perspective. The course focuses on types of costs, cost behavior, costing systems, activity-based costing, cost-volume-profit analysis and budgeting.

Business Administration Courses

GB 501 Fundamentals of Business Management 6 Cr.

This seminar presents learning in economics, management, and marketing and operations management from the perspective of a business manager. Students focus on the economic framework for business decision-making, learning the importance of and gaining an ability to assess market conditions as the context for all business strategy development and implementation, Management’s ability to plan for and execute advantageous a strategy to achieve organization objectives through efficient and effective allocation of its human, capital and intellectual resources are discussed. Students learn theory and skills for best practices in the marketing and operations management of products and services.

GB 502 Quantitative Methods and Financial Analysis for Managers 6 Cr.

This seminar concentrates on the learning and demonstration of competency in the accounting process, understanding the accounting equation, the basics of double-entry bookkeeping the income statement, the balance sheet and the statement of cash flow statement. Learning how these statements effect the calculation of financial ratios as tests of enterprise profitability, asset utilization, risk and liquidity is required.

GB 511 Strategic Resources Management 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on strategic management of intangible assets of an organization: human capital, information capital, and organizational capital. Human motivation, workforce utilization, performance measurement, leadership, organizational culture and change, management information systems, knowledge management, and contingency planning are discussed.

GB 522 Managerial Finance 6 Cr.

This seminar introduces the problems of finance function and the responsibilities of the chief financial executive Efficient allocation and uses of funds is emphasized. Topics include Financial Analysis, Cash Flow and Financial Planning, Capital Budgeting, Valuation Models, Risk and Return Analysis, Leverage and Capital Structure, Working Capital Management, and International Business Finance.

GB 532 Strategic Marketing & Operations Management 6 Cr.

This seminar centers on Marketing and Operations Management from their own functional perspectives in a business organization and how to achieve integration of the two functions. The Product Life Cycle (PLC) model is used as a framework for integrating the two disciplines to demonstrate how the nature and interface of marketing and operations change as products evolve through the PLC. Prereq GB 522.

GB 544 Project Management Techniques, Tools and Practices 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on the fundamentals of project management and practices. The key elements of project management from the project management framework, the project life cycle, project process and key project management knowledge areas are discussed. Additionally, the project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, resource and schedule management are studied. Other areas of focus are project management procurement and overall project communications.

GB 545 Multinational Business Finance 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on advanced topics in Corporate Finance and on Multinational Business Finance. Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) are unique institutions that act as catalysts and facilitators of international trade and as important producers and marketers in host countries where their subsidiaries are located. Identifies and describes the differences between multinational business finance and domestic finance. Topics presented are Global Financial Environment, Foreign Exchange Theory, The Foreign Exchange Market and Derivatives, Foreign Exchange Exposure, Financing The Global Firm, Foreign Investment Decisions, and Managing Multinational Operations. Prereq: GB 522, or permission of the program director.

GB 547 Supply Chain Management Strategy, Planning and Operations 6 Cr.

The focus of this seminar is the building of business supply chain strategies, which include: supply chain performance, fit and scope, supply chain drivers and metrics, processes, the management of suppliers, inventory strategies, parts management and distribution. Examines demand forecasting, aggregate planning and sales and operation planning, uncertainty, and archetype strategies with a focus on flexibility, speed and technology.

GB 548 Energy Resources and Markets 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses the energy resources and markets that include: introduction to the origins and the typology of the alternate ways to generate energy; price formation of energy and its markets; description of the existing markets and their most common negotiating instruments in relation to each type of energy: oil, natural gas, coal and electricity; development of energy markets and its regulations in U.S., EU and Latin America; environmental and climate change policies; and the feasible energy mix for the organization under the security of supply.

GB 549 Technology Management Strategy 6 Cr.

Students explore key technology management concepts related to strategy, planning, processes, the application technologies in key business operational areas from engineering, production, assembly, warehousing, distribution, transportation, procurement, contracts, networking, inventory and overall business operations. Prerequisites: GB 511, GB 522 and GB532.

GB 552 International Business Management 6 Cr.

This seminar addresses the strategic management of international organizations. Providing a theoretical framework to compare, contrast, and evaluate the differences between domestic-only and internationally active organizations. Learners examine and apply concepts pertaining to the globalization of business, the internationalization of a specific organization, and the factors that influence these two outcomes. Learners learn how to make decisions rooted in the increasingly international context of today's business world.

GB 554 Project Management Leadership, Communications and Teams 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on project management leadership, effective communications and the management of project teams. Students explore the fundamental principles of good project management, including: leadership skills, winning stakeholder cooperation, writing the rules to manage expectations, project risk management, creating realistic schedules, achieving accurate project estimates, trade-offs between project cost, schedule and quality, building strong project teams, clear communications, measuring progress, problem solving, defining clear requirements and applying lean principles in project management. This seminar discuss project leadership, communication and team management skills integrating them with concepts from Seminar 4's, resulting in fundamental principles of project management being integrated with leadership, communications and team building practices and challenges.

GB 555 Investments and Portfolio Management 6 Cr.

Students learn the characteristics and analysis of individual securities as well as the theory and practice of optimally combining securities into portfolios. This seminar is organized around two basic themes: the security market, a highly efficient market, and an investor who diversifies and takes a long-term approach to investing, generally rewarded with higher returns and less risk.

GB 557 Supply Chain Management Logistics, Design and Execution 6 Cr.

Students learn supply chain “movement”, warehouse design, capacity management, delivering customer value, measuring logistics cost and performance, matching up supply with demand, creation of a responsive supply chain and the management of complexity and risk.

GB 558 Energy Saving Efficiency Proj 6 Cr.

Managing an organization's project to save and use energy in the most efficient way, including introductions to sustainability, energy intensity, energy efficiency and savings are topics of this seminar. These aspects are reviewed for electricity and heat generators energy systems. Students develop an efficiency solution project for a company, including financial aspects, auditing and energy strategies. Prereq: GB 548.

GB 560 Strategic Management 6 Cr.

Strategic management of entire organizations, which implies total responsibility for integrating and coordinating all activities and the accomplishment of long-term goals that determine organizational survival are discussed. Analytical models are used to dissect actual case scenarios, identify business problems, and develop strategic recommendations. Students debate topical and controversial current issues in corporate management and have the opportunity to interact with industry leaders. A project that integrates results of prior seminars into a cohesive strategic analysis of an international company is required along with a comprehensive outcomes assessment.

GB 561 Assessment Exam 0 Cr.

The assessment exam is a requirement of the MBA program and is part of the graduation requirement. The exam covers business concepts discussed throughout the MBA program and is administered during the student's final term. Exam dates and instructions will be provided by Norwich staff well ahead of time. The exam in not graded, and t does not affect the student's GPA for the program.

GB 564 Strategic Management in Project Management 6 Cr.

Applications from the GB 544 and GB 554 are applied in this seminar using the fundamental principles of project management from the project management framework, the project life cycle, project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, and schedule management. Students include the integration of leadership skills, winning stakeholder cooperation, project risk management, building strong project teams, clear communications, measuring progress and problem solving in a proposed project. Prereqs: GB 544 and GB 554, or permission of the Program Director.

GB 565 Strategic Management in Finance 6 Cr.

This seminar illustrates the application of tools and concepts of modern finance. This seminar is the culmination of the study of finance for the MBA program. The seminar relies on the techniques and theories of Corporate Finance, Multinational Business Finance, and Investments to expand students’ strategic perspectives and enhance their financial analysis skills. Case analysis is used and managing for corporate value creation is the focus of all cases used in this seminar. Prereqs: GB 522, GB 545, and GB 555.

GB 567 Supply Chain Management Assessment, Integration, and Optimization 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on supply chain optimization, which includes topics such as: value assessment of the supply chain, baseline and optimization, capacity management, project management, demand forecasting, quantitative risk assessment, constraint optimization and time estimating techniques. Students learn to integrate important ideas associated with supply chain strategies, logistic operations, and operational optimization with a focus on continuous improvement of supply chain operations. Prereqs: GB 547 and GB 557, or permission of the program director.

GB 568 Managing CorporateEnergy Needs 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on energy procurement optimization with security of supply, quality and low cost, including how to value available and feasible energy sources of supply, manage energy procurement processes, contracts management, sector supply strategies, demand forecasting, quantitative risk assessment, the company flow of information and cooperative procurement techniques. A detailed behavior of each relevant energy market (oil, gas & electricity) from the demand point of view is discussed. Components of the energy markets and the available energy origins are reviewed, as well as internal analysis of the organization needs and processes, to optimize all aspects of a company’s energy procurement. Students will acquire analytical and managerial capacity and skills to resolve the energy procurement of the organization. Prereqs: Completion of seminars GB 548 and GB 558.

GB 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Residency is the final academic requirement for the MBA program. In a week-long residency at Norwich University, students meet with fellow students, faculty, and program staff in formal and informal classroom settings. Exemptions from the residency attendance and participation requirement must be approved in advance by the Dean. When an exemption is approved, an alternate academic assignment is required prior to the conferral of the master's degree. The annual Residency Conference includes program-specific academic recognition ceremonies and a college-wide graduation ceremony.

Business Continuity Courses

BC 521 Public Sector Incident Management and Emergency Response 6 Cr.

This course teaches how to respond to incidents that effect governmental agencies. The topics include developing a response plan, emergency operations centers, emergency communication, and working with the first responder community. Students will also learn how to develop off-site backups and work areas, and how to get people and equipment in place for continuing operations during an emergency.

Civil Engineering Courses

CE 501 Hydraulics for Environmental Engineers 3 Cr.

A review of fluid mechanics and hydraulics fundamentals. Pipe flow and networks, open channel flow, measurement techniques for fluids.

CE 503 Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering 6 Cr.

Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics: an introduction to the engineering properties of soils: theory of soil compression and shear strength with practical applications. Fundamentals of Foundation Engineering: determination of bearing capacity and settlement characteristics of shallow and deep foundations. Design and evaluation of earth slopes and earth retaining structures. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Master of Civil Engineering program.

CE 505 Engineering Analysis Techniques 3 Cr.

A fast-paced review of fundamental techniques from typical undergraduate level calculus courses. Mastery of these topics is required for success in the differential equations and engineering analysis courses in the MCE program.

CE 506 Engineering Mechanics I 3 Cr.

A review of engineering mechanics fundamentals from the fields of statics, dynamics, and mechanics of materials. Free body diagrams, force systems, equilibrium, geometric properties, kinematics, kinetics, stress and strain.

CE 507 Fundamentals of Structural Engineering 6 Cr.

A review of the basic concepts of structural engineering that form the required background for later courses. Types of structures, construction materials, structural design, and safety issues are discussed. Students will become familiar with a number of typical structural design calculation methods for later use.

CE 509 Fundamentals of Environmental/Water Resources Engineering 6 Cr.

A review of the basic concepts of environmental and water resources engineering that form the required background for later courses. Basic concepts from environmental chemistry, ecology, biology, microbiology, geology, and soil science along with an introduction to environmental engineering field. Designed to prepare students for entry into the Environmental Engineering / Water Resources concentration of the Master of Civil Engineering program.

CE 523 Intermediate Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering 6 Cr.

Intermediate Soil Mechanics: general principles of soil mechanics and their applications, including soil structure, mineralogy, fluid flow through porous media, shear strength, slope stability, primary consolidation and secondary consolidation. Classical earth pressure theories. Subjects will be presented from a theoretical perspective and include practical applications. Foundation Engineering: analysis of shallow and deep foundations including bearing capacity and settlement of shallow footings, floating foundations, drilled piers and piles. Analysis of stability and design of retaining walls and anchored bulkheads. Prerequisite: EG 501 (Engineering Mathematics) or permission of Program Director.

CE 525 Physiochemical & Biological Processes in Water & Wastewater Treatment 6 Cr.

Physical, chemical, biological, and advanced treatment unit processes. This course will cover basic physical, chemical and biological concepts, reactor kinetics, water and wastewater qualities and quantities, and physical, chemical, and biological unit processes. Design of individual unit processes and integration of unit processes into treatment trains capable of meeting treatment objectives will be emphasized. Prerequisite: EG 501.

CE 528 Classical, Matrix, and Dynamic Analysis of Structures 6 Cr.

This course addresses two tracks of analysis. First, static analysis is investigated with advanced classical methods and with matrix methods, the cornerstone of the finite element method. Second, dynamic analysis is presented using both classical and matrix approaches for single and multiple degree of freedom systems. Analysis issues related to design codes are addressed for both static and dynamic conditions. The use of commercially available software is introduced. Prerequisite: EG 501.

CE 529 Information Technology 6 Cr.

This course develops a base level competency in a host of project management software products. Virtual Design and Construction applications as well as enterprise wide IT solutions will be examined. In addition it develops an understanding of the importance of integrating an information technology strategy across all aspects of the project and the organization. Prerequisite: EG 501 (Engineering Mathematics) or permission of Program Director.

CE 533 Earthquake Engineering and Soil Stabilization 6 Cr.

Earthquake Engineering: evaluation of geotechnical earthquake hazards and mitigation. Plate tectonics, seismicity, wave propagation, characterization of ground motions, theory of vibrations, effect of local soil conditions on ground response, development of design ground motions, liquefaction, dynamic lateral earth pressures, slope stability and deformation, earthquake design codes. Soil Stabilization: the application of mineralogical and physicochemical principals to soil stabilization problems, and stabilization techniques for highway and foundation applications. Prerequisite: CE 523 (Intermediate Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering) or permission of Program Director.

CE 535 Stormwater Management and GIS Applications for Water Resources 6 Cr.

Storm water management issues, from both flood control and water quality points of view, are integral water resource components associated with land development, urbanization, and watershed hydrology. This course will examine rainfall-runoff relationships (including statistical analysis), channel and basin routing, storm water treatment, low impact development, best management practices, and wetland utilization and benefit/cost ratio analysis. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software will be introduced and applied for examining and analyzing decision-making processes involved with the storm water management components of the course.

CE 538 Design of Steel and Timber Structures 6 Cr.

An exploration of advanced structural design issues in the areas of both steel and timber. Using the latest provisions from the American Institute of Steel Construction and the National Design Specification for Wood Construction the course will cover the design and behavior of 2-D and 3-D framing, framing members and connections under various loading conditions, including wind and seismic. Strength and serviceability issues.

CE 539 Contracts and Insurance 6 Cr.

This course addresses the risk characteristics of various contractual forms and the place that insurance and surety plays in the AEC arena. The emergence of new contractual forms from AIA and the Consensus Docs require a new perspective on contracts and the project organization. This seminar will develop a strategic understanding of contract variables that span plans and specs to Integrated Project Delivery. Prerequisite: CE 529 (Information Technology) or permission of Program Director.

CE 553 Computer Modeling in Geotechnical Engineering and Geotechnical Engineering Case Histories 6 Cr.

Survey of computer methods and applications for analysis of complex geotechnical engineering problems. Finite element, finite difference and closed form solution techniques, modeling applications. Review of select geotechnical engineering case studies. The course will also spend time formulating proposals for the student's upcoming capstone design project in CE 561. Prerequisite: CE 533 (Earthquake Engineering and Soil Stabilization) or permission of Program Director.

CE 555 Geoenvironmental Engineering - Groundwater Flow and Waste Containment 6 Cr.

This course approaches the field of geoenvironmental engineering from two points of view: groundwater flow and contaminant transport issues and the principals related to solid waste disposal and containment. The groundwater portion of the course will focus on flow and contaminant transport including aquifer properties, principles of ground-water flow, flow into wells, soil moisture and ground-water recharge, regional ground-water flow and the advection, diffusion and attenuation of ground-water contaminants. The solid waste portion of the course will focus on landfill siting, design and construction. Material properties and engineering design of geosynthetic components including geomembranes, geotextiles, geocomposites, and geosynthetic clay liners. Methods to estimate and design landfill leachate quantities and gas generation. The course will also spend time formulating proposals for the student's upcoming capstone design project in CE 561.

CE 558 Design of Reinforced and Prestressed/Precast Concrete Structures 6 Cr.

This course focuses on advanced topics in reinforced concrete design and an introduction to prestressed / precast concrete using the provisions of the American Concrete Institute. Beams, slabs, columns, deflections, analysis and design of prestressed members, loss calculations, use of standard precast members. Design and detailing for seismic loads. The course will also spend time formulating proposals for the student's upcoming capstone design project in CE 561.

CE 559 Project Finance and Accounting 6 Cr.

This course focuses on understanding project risk and financial performance across all project participants. It will address traditional financial arrangements as well as new models such as the Special Purpose Entity (SPE) and Public Private Partnerships (PPP). This seminar will enable the student to address the ever increasing complexity of the financial arena. The course will also spend time formulating proposals for the student's upcoming capstone design project in CE 561. Prerequisite: CE 539 (Contracts and Insurance) or permission of Program Director.

CE 561 Capstone Design Project 6 Cr.

Civil engineering projects have always had social, political, economic, and environmental impacts. The capstone design project requires you to anticipate these impacts prior to project implementation. As the engineer in a leadership position you will direct the project from conception to completion. This includes the preparation of a comprehensive project business plan that will include project goals, political hurdles, anticipated revenues and expenses, marketing, facility design, etc.; all pertaining to the design of a major civil engineering project.

CE 571 Elementary Geotechnical Tools Laboratory 1 Cr.

Survey of techniques for classification of soils, assessment of hydraulic properties, consolidation, and assessment of shear strength parameters of soils. Field experience in geotechnical exploration. Corequisite: CE 503 (Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering) or permission of Program Director.

CE 572 Intermediate Geotechincal Tools Laboratory 1 Cr.

Survey of techniques for assessing permeability of soils using the flexible wall apparatus, Proctor compaction and triaxial shear testing. Field visit to geotechnical project site. Prerequisite: CE 553 (Numerical Methods in Geotechnical Engineering) or permission of Program Director.

CE 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Common Engineering Courses

EG 501 Engineering Mathematics 6 Cr.

First and second order differential equations, basic matrix algebra with emphasis on solving systems of equations and understanding eigenvalues and eigenvectors, numerical techniques for solving both differential and algebraic equations, and an introduction to partial differential equations. Basic concepts in probability and statistics, random variables, testing hypotheses, confidence intervals, and correlation along with the least square line. In addition to solving problems by hand, students will also be using software tools. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Master of Civil Engineering program.

Communication Courses

COMM 205 Tech-Mediated Communication 3 Cr.

A study of human communication and the effect of modern technology on it. Students review basic communication theory, including non-verbal and intercultural communication, and then evaluate the impact of technology on the effectiveness and efficiency of communication. Topics include: spoken vs. written communication; synchronous vs. asynchronous communication; the status of world languages on the internet; the impact of social media; modern workplace communication; and trends in the development of communication technology.

COMM 301 Business & ProfessionalWriting 3 Cr.

This course is a study of the role and application of leadership principles to writing in the workplace. Students learn that the writing done in the workplace is not simply a matter of presenting facts and recommendations with an emphasis on clarity and focus; rather, it is the context of the task that drives the value of the resulting writing. Leaders in the workplace write to change lives and, to do so, must understand and manage the impact of their words. This approach requires an analysis of the situation and an analysis of the data used to create the written communication. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a basic, non-developmental college writing course (such as EN101) or its equivalent.

COMM 302 Data Analysis and Writing 3 Cr.

This course is designed to strengthen the technological, analytical, and written communications skills needed in careers in law enforcement, intelligence, and security. Students identify certain key data resources, and apply the data obtained in various communication contexts. The course emphasizes specific types of documents and communication channels used in the law enforcement community. Pre-requisite: SOCI209.

COMM 305 Strategic Communications 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to principles of strategic communication. The course provides a detailed understanding of the important role that participatory web media play in strategic communication. Topics include understanding and defining strategic communication, public diplomacy, who is responsible for conducting strategic communication, challenges of U.S. strategic communication, improving strategic communication, and the future of strategic communication. Practical application of the tenets of strategic communication will be accomplished by reviewing and critiquing high-profile cases from the Iraq war and other significant events. This course will enable students to identify and apply the basic characteristics of effective strategic communication. Prerequisite: None.

COMM 312 Intercultural Communication 3 Cr.

This course prepares the student to communicate effectively in both written and verbal forms within the context of a multi-cultural society. The course covers best practices in investigative reporting, written reports and memos, and interpersonal verbal communication within criminal justice settings, including interactions with victims, suspects, incarcerated persons, government officials, community leaders, staff, and civilians. 3 lecture hours. Pre-requisites: none.

COMM 315 Tech-Mediated Communication 3 Cr.

This course is a study of human communication and the effect of modern technology on it. Students review basic communication theory, including non-verbal and intercultural communication, and then evaluate the impact of technology on the effectiveness and efficiency of communication. Topics include: spoken versus written communication; synchronous versus asynchronous communication; the status of world languages on the internet; the impact of social media; modern workplace communication; and trends in the development of communication technology.

Criminal Justice Courses

CRMJ 1XX Criminal Justice Elective 6 Cr.

CRMJ 201 Foundations Criminal Justice 3 Cr.

This course provides a general survey of the principles, systems, and processes of criminal justice. Students will explore conceptions and definitions of crime, criminal law, due process, and the organization and operation of the three basic components of the criminal justice system – the police, the courts, and corrections – both individually and in relationship to one another. Pre-requisites: none.

CRMJ 303 The Study of Crime 3 Cr.

Students develop their skills in developing and analyzing intelligence. They learn how to collaborate with public and governmental agencies to share intelligence that is critically important to improving public safety and security. Pre-requisite: None.

CRMJ 305 Law Enforcement Administration 3 Cr.

This course applies management and financial principles to criminal justice organizations. Emphasis is placed on budgets, financial accounting principles, and assessing the effectiveness of the activities of criminal justice organizations. Students will also discuss constitutional requirements, court decisions, and legislation (such as EEOC requirements) as they impact management in criminal justice organizations. The purposes and formats of financial statements and basic accounting and financial terminology are introduced: depreciation of assets, capital budgeting, cash management, lease versus purchase, and inventory management. Pre-requisites: none. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

CRMJ 306 Procedural Due Process 3 Cr.

This course examines the principle that the government must respect all of the legal rights that are owed to a person according to the law. Students will explore and examine procedural due process as it relates to the procedure of arresting and trying persons who have been accused of crimes. Students will also examine specific government actions that may deprive an individual of life, liberty, or property. Overall, the course will address the applications and administration of due process as well as potential abuse. Pre-requisites: none.

CRMJ 307 Cold Case Investigations 3 Cr.

This course examines the process of cold criminal case investigations. Students analyze the reasons why investigations become classified as a cold case and the factors involved in re-assigning or re-opening a cold case. Students also study the problems, practices and methods in investigating a cold case. Advances in forensic evidence and science are studied as they apply to criminal investigations and the ability to solve cases formally considered unsolvable. As part of this process, actual criminal cases are analyzed and discussed. Students have the opportunity to research cold cases and develop investigative approaches to solving such cases.

CRMJ 340 Foundations in Interrogation 3 Cr.

Foundations in Interrogation offers a multidimensional and integrated perspective in the operational, legal, and ethical frameworks for interrogation tradecraft and current interrogation practitioners and managers serving in law enforcement, the military, or the intelligence community. Prereqs: CRMJ 201 or Program Manager approval.

CRMJ 400 Capstone 6 Cr.

Students analyze and synthesize program learning with a particular focus on ethics and leadership. Students analyze ethical scenarios and a tactical ethics text and present an in-depth ethical analysis paper. Students must address how their work will contribute their department and/or the Law Enforcement and Public Safety collective body of knowledge about the topic(s) under discussion. Pre-requisites: Completion of all BSCJ courses or permission of the Program Manager.

Cyber Security Courses

CYBR 201 Fundamentals of Computer Networking 3 Cr.

This course is the study of the core theories and protocols that are the foundation of computer networking. The Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model and the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), protocol suite are discussed in detail. This course provides a detailed overview of networking terminology, while examining the different networking topologies and architectures. Pre-requisites: none.

CYBR 210 Computer Programming with a High Level Language 3 Cr.

This course covers the fundamental concepts of computer programming, using a high level scripted programming language. The course emphasizes design and implementation standards. This course is designed to provide the skills necessary to become an effective cyber security practitioner. Prerequisite: None.

CYBR 215 Computer Programming with a Low Level Language 3 Cr.

This course covers the fundamental concepts of computer programming, using a low-level scripted programming language. This course is designed to provide the skills necessary to understand basic computer architecture, allowing the cyber security specialist to better identify, understand and remove security threats at the machine level. Pre-requisites: none.

CYBR 220 Windows Server Administration 3 Cr.

This course provides students with the skills necessary to design, implement, manage and protect a Microsoft Windows Server Active Directory Domain. Students apply the lessons learned in this course by implementing an Active Directory Domain in a virtual environment. Pre-requisites: none.

CYBR 225 Linux Administration 3 Cr.

This course provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills to install, configure, upgrade and manage a Linux operating system in an enterprise network. Additionally, students learn to perform normal business operations using the Linux Operating system. Pre-requisites: none.

CYBR 230 Relational Databases with SQL 3 Cr.

This course covers the fundamental concepts of relational databases and the scripted Structure Query Language (SQL) language used to manage them. Students learn how to design functional relational databases that conform to industry standards. Prerequisite: none.

CYBR 320 Vulnerability Testing I 3 Cr.

This course is the first of a two-part introduction to Penetration Testing and Vulnerability Assessment. This course presents the concepts, tools, and techniques used for penetration testing, vulnerability exploitation, assessment, reporting, and forensics; teaches multiple attack vectors as well as the defensive measures protecting against such attacks; focuses heavily on post-attack forensics allowing for a complete picture of the attack process. The course introduces several open- source tools such as the Metasploit framework, Nmap, Nessus, Wireshark and Kali Linux. This course includes hands-on lab exercises using a virtual computer environment. Prerequisite: permission of program manager.

CYBR 370 Introduction to Information Warfare 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the overall concept of Information Warfare (IW) and Information Operations (IO), particularly with regard to the US Federal government and the Department of Defense. Introduction to IW / IO surveys the development of Information Warfare (IW) and Information Operations (IO) as these elements of power have become more important for the United States Department of Defense (DoD) and Federal Government as a whole. The course assumes only a rudimentary familiarity with the basic concepts and terminology of modern Internet usage and computing and is not a technology-focused course. Pre-requisites: none.

CYBR 380 Offensive Information Warfare 3 Cr.

Students learn how Offensive Information Warfare is executed at the technical level and the defensive measures cybersecurity professionals use to prevent them. The following principles from the National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security Information Assurance/Cyber Defense Knowledge Units are examined: Cyber, Defense, Cyber Threats, IA Fundamentals, Policy, Legal, Ethics, and Compliance, Network Defense and Networking Technology and Protocols. Prereqs: CYBR 370 or Program Manager permission.

CYBR 382 Defensive Information Warfare 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the overall concept of Defensive Information Operations (D-IO), which are conducted across the range of military operations at every level of war to achieve mission objectives. Combatant commanders and mission owners must carefully consider their defensive posture and strategy in order to deter and defeat adversary intrusion while providing mission assurance. Upon completion of this course, students develop a defensive strategy by analyzing risk, cyberspace terrain, mission priorities, and utilizing threat intelligence. Pre-requisite CYBR 370 or Permission of Instructor.

CYBR 400 Cyber Capstone 6 Cr.

This is the final course of the program in which students analyze and synthesize program learning by examining a chosen organization's network infrastructure and security posture. Students present an in-depth analysis paper as their final deliverable. Pre-requisites: Completion of CJ442, DF311, DF312, DF411, CYBR320 & CYBR420 for the Computer Forensics and Vulnerability Management concentration or completion of CYBR370, CYBR380, CYBR382, CS407, POLS302 & CYBR410 c or permission of the Program Manager. This course may not be satisfied by transfer credit.

CYBR 410 Systems Assurance 3 Cr.

This course focuses on the design considerations involved with the security of site design. The course will also provide and understanding of the Levels of Trust and system accreditation/certificate processes. Life cycle management of software, hardware, and physical plant, from planning through destruction will be examined and reinforced using case studies. Additionally, understanding of the variety of security systems involving computers and networks and an ability to evaluate vulnerabilities will be discussed. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

CYBR 420 Vulnerability Testing II 3 Cr.

This course is the second of a two-part introduction to Penetration Testing and Vulnerability Assessment. This course presents the concepts, tools, and techniques used for penetration testing, vulnerability exploitation, assessment, reporting, and forensics; teaches multiple attack vectors as well as the defensive measures protecting against such attacks; focuses heavily on post-attack forensics allowing for a complete picture of the attack process. The course introduces several open- source tools such as the Metasploit framework, Nmap, Nessus, Wireshark, Vistumbler, BurpSuite, Nikto, Cain and Abel, Aircrack-ng Suite, John the Ripper, Social Engineer Toolkit and Kali Linux. This course includes hands-on lab exercises using a virtual computer environment. Pre-requisite: CYBR320 or permission of program manager.

Defense Analysis Courses

SSDA 306 Science and Technology Visual Augmentation Defense Systems 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the primary concepts of visual augmentation defense technology, particularly with regard to its use by the U.S. Federal Government and the Department of Defense. Students learn the history and evolution of optics as well as the scientific principles that underlie development and utilization of selected technologies. Pre-requisites: none.

SSDA 310 Emergency and Disaster Relief Operations 6 Cr.

This course examines the principles used by emergency managers to respond to local or regional disasters. Students examine the NIMS (National Incident Management System) and other standards governing emergency management. Pre-requisites: None.

SSDA 315 Insurgency and Conflict 6 Cr.

Students compare and contrast selected insurgencies and counter-insurgencies from across the globe. Students gain knowledge needed to analyze and establish mission profiles for past, present and future conflicts. Pre-requisite: None.

SSDA 320 Information Operations 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to the overall concept of information warfare (IW) and information operations (IO), particularly in regard to the US federal government and Department of Defense. Pre-requisites: None.

SSDA 325 Law of Armed Conflict and Legal Basis for Use of Force 3 Cr.

A study of the law of armed conflict and the legal use of force. Students review international law theory, including the primary sources of international law, and then evaluate the impact of international law on past, present and future operations. Topics include: international law formulation; rules of engagement; issues surrounding detainees, internees and prisoners of war; air, land and sea laws; and the application of international law as it pertains to military operations. Prerequisites: none.

SSDA 400 The Capstone Project 6 Cr.

Students analyze and synthesize program learning with a particular focus on ethics and leadership. Students analyze ethical scenarios and a tactical ethics text and present an in-depth ethical analysis paper. Students must address how their work will contribute to the U.S. Military’s body of knowledge about the topic(s) under discussion. Pre-requisites: Completion of all SSDA courses or permission of the Program Manager.

Diplomacy Courses

GD 510 Theory and the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will review the basic theories that govern the international relations discipline. As no one theory fully explains the international system, a firm grasp of the leading paradigms gives a student a solid foundation on which to build the degree. This seminar will also trace the historical evolution of diplomacy within the international system giving the student a sense of its progression and an awareness of the milestones of diplomatic interaction within that system.

GD 511 The History of Diplomacy in the International System 6 Cr.

This seminar is a comprehensive overview of diplomacy, international relations, and world order in the context of the modern state system, from 1648 to the present. The seminar provides an introduction to the international political environment through studies in foreign policy decision-making. The seminar combines the fields of history and political science by using an analytical framework of historiography and International Relations methodology.

GD 520 Law and the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will explore some of the important principles, norms, customs, laws, and transactions in international relations. Student will be introduced to international law terminology, history, and dominant theories. The laws surrounding conflict, war and war crimes will be explored. Of special interest will be the laws and norms pertaining to international organizations. Finally, the more up and coming areas of international law will be explored, such as, environmental law and the growing body of law concerning humanitarian intervention.

GD 530 Economics and the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will explore the international economic system. The impact of modernization and economic development within the system will be examined. The controversy over the concept of globalization will be explored. The seminar will address the dominant theories of international political economy. Students will become familiar with institutions of international finance and trade. Special attention will be given to Third World development issues. Also, the idea of economics as a tool of diplomacy and military power will be raised.

GD 540 Conflict Avoidance, Prevention & Containment in the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will address a number of schools of thought and debates concerning the causes of inter and intra-state conflicts. The increasingly controversial topics of peacekeeping, peace-making and peace enforcement will be reviewed with an eye toward lessons learned. Transnational forces, including non-governmental organizations will be investigated. Finally, the important concept of multilateral diplomacy as a tool used to avoid conflict in the international system will be examined.

GD 541 The Practice of Diplomacy 6 Cr.

This seminar provides an understanding of the methods, institutions and practices that allow nations to translate foreign policy objectives and strategies into practical actions, and how practitioners adjust and refine foreign policy in response to the events that influence outcomes. The course is based on practitioner’s perspective to diplomacy. The emphasis is on foreign policy practices and structures of the United States of America, but the seminar ha broad applicability to the study of the diplomatic practice of other nations that operate in an analogous domestic political environment of a separation of powers, relative openness and freedom of expression.

GD 542 Terrorism: Introduction and State Sponsored Terrorism 6 Cr.

This seminar examines how states have used terrorism as a tool in managing their international rivalries. The seminar also evaluates the actions that the international community takes to deter state-sponsored terrorism. Case studies will be used to complement theory, and to allow for comparative analysis of actions taken by the international community in different cases and circumstances.

GD 544 Global Commerce and the International System 6 Cr.

This seminar evaluates the role of private-sector commerce in the international system. It focuses on examining internal and external environmental conditions when conducting commerce in a global environment; in particular, students will explore the impact of economics, law, politics, and culture on multinational business endeavors. Country specific data and internal organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making in multinational organizations are addressed as well.

GD 546 International Security 6 Cr.

This course surveys some of the major debates and topics in international security. It is designed to give students an understanding of the most important substantive areas in the field of International Security and to tie academic research on security‐related issues to policy. The course will examine both traditional understandings of and approaches to international security. New actors and issues considered relevant since the end of the Cold War will be discussed. The tension between the relative importance of traditional approaches to security, interstate relations, and the relevance or impact of less immediate but important influences such as human security and climate change will also be examined.

GD 547 Cyber Policy I 6 Cr.

This course addresses basic definitions and nomenclature in the area of cyber security assessment, risk analysis derived from actual cases, and issued of cyber privacy and piracy.

GD 548 Studies in Cyber Systems I 6 Cr.

The course navigates sections of classical mathematics and computer science used to construct mathematical models of information security. The course also addresses statistical methods for forensic accounting and assurance, internal controls and financial information systems, and auditing of modern complex accounting information systems.

GD 550 Conflict Resolution & Post-Conflict Reconstruction in the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will examine the “dos” and “don'ts” of negotiating peace, hazards of negotiations and peace settlements, their unexpected consequences, and lessons learned. Of increasing importance is learning how to recover from atrocities through trials, truth commissions, and amnesties. Post-conflict political, economic, and social recoveries are also explored. The seminar also addresses such issues as reestablishing the rule of law, reconstruction of civil society, and of the institutions of governance. Finally, students will examine the politics and cultural impacts of rebuilding, including the economic and financial costs.

GD 552 International Terrorism by Non-State Actors 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the phenomenon of transnational terrorism by non-state actors, that is, by terrorist organizations. Ideology, psychology, and strategies of major transnational groups are addressed to provide an understanding of their long-term goals and operations. Terrorist groups' relationships with WMD proliferation and organized crime are examined, together with possible future trends in terrorist operations. Case studies of key groups will be used to provide comparative analysis.

GD 554 Cross Cultural Management in the International System 6 Cr.

Students will review fundamental topics in human resources management as these pertain to globally active organizations: corporate, not-profit, and governmental. The seminar focuses on building personal skills in dealing with intercultural Human Resources, management differences; selecting, evaluating, and compensating employees in international assignments; training and developing expatriate employees; dealing with culture shock; and examining the effects of repatriation. Students will be asked to apply the concepts of conflict managements, conflict resolution, and conflict avoidance to specific "at-work" situations.

GD 555 Comprehensive Exam 0 Cr.

The Comprehensive exam is a degree completion requirement for all Diplomacy students.

GD 557 Cyber Policy II 6 Cr.

The course introduces social, political and psychological issues in policy implementation as they relate to information security specific policies both in the domestic and international contexts, including the tools and techniques of cyber-attacks that are common to cyber warfare, cyber espionage, cyber terrorism and cyber activism, and efforts to control or mitigate the threat of cyber warfare through diplomacy, arms control treaties and confidence building measures.

GD 558 Studies in Cyber Systems II 6 Cr.

The course navigates sections of classical mathematics and computer science used to construct mathematical models of information security. It discusses the need for mathematical models in different security paradigms along with the essential definitions, concepts and results for developing the models, their strengths and weaknesses, and, consequently, its application to practical problems. The course also addresses statistical methods for forensic accounting and assurance, internal controls and financial information systems, and auditing of modern complex accounting information systems.

GD 560 Military Intervention & Conflict Management in the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will examine conflict in all its forms. Such aspects as covert operations, psychological warfare, special operations, and limited warfare will be introduced. The increased emphasis on multinational coalitions and conflicts will be explored. A renewed emphasis will be given to terrorism, including the use of chemical, biological and nuclear agents. Special cases of civil war and collapsed state conflicts will be reviewed. Finally, the impact of modern warfare, most notably on the environment will be investigated.

GD 561 Human Rights and Conflict in the International System 6 Cr.

In this seminar students will probe the complicated connections between the protection and enforcement of human rights norms and the roots, unfolding, and termination of armed conflicts. Borrowing from the fields of peace-building, conflict resolution, diplomacy, and law, the seminar builds upon the themes of conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction developed in previous seminars by focusing on how human rights abuses make conflicts, especially violent conflicts more likely, and how a respect for the political, civil, economic, and social claims of individuals might repair and restore post-conflict societies.

GD 562 International Response to Transnational Terrorism 6 Cr.

This seminar surveys the strategies and policies used by states to combat transnational terrorism. It includes the development of international law as a tool against terrorism. It focuses on diplomatic and multilateral approaches to deal with cross-border issues, and government policies designed to improve internal and multinational anti-terrorism coordination and cooperation. Differences and commonalities among states in their approaches to terrorism are highlighted in an effort to examine best practices.

GD 564 Global Corporate Diplomacy 6 Cr.

This seminar addresses the issue of how international commerce depends upon the public goodwill, the development of which is the function of corporate diplomacy. The seminar will enable students to develop knowledge, competencies, and tools for implementing strategic communication in order to deal effectively with international constituencies, including the government, the news media and the Internet, and NGOs. Special emphasis will be laid on developing analytical skills to shape public opinion, build corporate reputation, and deal with crisis in a cross-cultural environment.

GD 567 Diplomacy and Communication 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the role of communication in diplomatic endeavors. The historical influence of communication is considered along with the evolving theoretical basis that has informed diplomatic communication. In addition to examining the role communication has played throughout the history of diplomacy, key challenges related diplomatic communication will be considered. These include cultural challenges, the evolving nature of communication technology, the movement towards transparency, and the development of public diplomacy.

GD 568 Cyber Diplomacy 6 Cr.

This course provides students the opportunity to synthesize learning from all previous seminars and to apply the concepts and principles relevant to the work or career goals of each student. Each student researches and prepares a written capstone project that offers a practical or theoretical solution to challenges or issues of contemporary international importance and relevance in cyber diplomacy. The final outcome of the seminar for each student is a paper suitable for publication in a professional or an academic journal. Students are required to exhibit in-depth critical thinking, analysis, and effective writing skills. Course assignments maximize the exchange of student suggestions and comments on the various stages of the capstone project, to include but not limited to topic section, thesis, resources and supporting information.

GD 570 Thesis Seminar 3 Cr.

In this research course students: identify their research topic, prepare a formal research proposal, identify literature and prepare bibliography, develop a methodological approach, prepare a thesis outline, and start working on chapter drafts. Students whose research projects that deal with human subjects have to familiarize themselves with ethical standards of conduct for scholarly research.

GD 571 Graduate Thesis Research II 3 Cr.

In this research course students: finalize their thesis outline, complete literature review, conduct necessary research, and start writing thesis chapters. Students work with their supervisors to develop a reasonable and coherent thesis draft.

GD 572 Graduate Thesis Research III 3 Cr.

Students are expected to read literature, do field research if applicable, prepare proposals, outline bibliographies, prepare drafts of theses chapters. This is a semester-long course, and it is estimated that students will spend approximately 140 hours in research and preparatory activities.

GD 573 Graduate Thesis Research IV 3 Cr.

Students are expected to finalize their research projects, and write and revise these chapters. This is a semester-long course, and it is estimated that students will spend approximately 140 hours in research and preparatory activities.

GD 575 Exit Portfolio 0 Cr.

The Exit Portfolio is a degree completion requirement for all Master of Arts in Diplomacy students.

GD 579 GR Research Project Exam 0 Cr.

Students’ research projects are examined, if applicable, through written and/or oral examination format. Students make necessary revisions to their final research product, and submit the final copy of their manuscript to the university.

GD 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Economics Courses

ECON 1XX Economics Elective 6 Cr.

ECON 310 Socio-Economic Studies 3 Cr.

Students explore tenets and characteristics of various economics systems, analyze economic indicators, conceptualize problems and recommend possible solutions. Pre- requisites: None.

ECON 350 Seminar in Economics 3-6 Cr.

Seminar in Economics (3-6): An intensive introduction and overview of the principles of macro and micro economics. The course begins with a high level analysis of the U.S. economy and then moves to a more in-depth look at topics such as production and output, pricing, economic growth, and the challenges of international trade, including issues related to international banking and non-U.S. stock markets.

ECON 351 Seminar in Finance 6 Cr.

In this course students are introduced to the theory and practices of the effective management of money in organizations. Topics covered include: sources and allocation of capital, including budgeting; cash flow analysis; financial markets and organizations; and risk analysis. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

ECON 401 Economic Studies 6 Cr.

In this regional economics course, students complete a research project to analyze the economy of a country or region of interest. Students survey and evaluate the economic institutions and infrastructure of the region. Local, regional and global challenges and opportunities that exist in the region will be explored. The study will include recommendations for improving the well-being of people by strengthening the region’s economic institutions and infrastructure. The course will culminate with a substantive research paper. Pre-requisites: Completion of ECON 310 or permission of Chair of Department of Continuing Studies.

Education Courses

ED 570 Teaching and Learning I 6 Cr.

This seminar introduces students to key topics related to teaching and learning. Students in this seminar focus on developing a philosophy of teaching and learning and on designing and presenting a learning experience. (Graduate Certificate course only.).

ED 571 Teaching and Learning II 6 Cr.

This seminar deepens students’ understanding of key issues involved in teaching and learning. A focus of this seminar will be to develop a course syllabus. Students will complete the seminar with a portfolio (a sample letter to a future employer, a philosophy statement, a learning experience document and a resume or CV) that will help them obtain employment. (Graduate Certificate course only.) Pre-requisite: ED570.

English Courses

ENGL 1XX Basic Expos Writing Competency 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Basic Expository Writing Competency.

ENGL 250 Crime in Literature 3 Cr.

A course in which students read and discuss works of literature that explore the ethical, social, and philosophical implications of criminal behavior and society's response to it. Prerequisite: Either EN102, EN108 or transfer equivalent from prior learning. 3 lecture hours. A recommended literature course for fulfillment of General Education, or Bachelor of Arts degree requirements in Literature, Arts and Humanities, or English.

ENGL 270 Military Literature 3 Cr.

A study of men and women in war and the military service, their ideals, experiences, and strategies as seen in foreign and American military literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. Pre-requisites: EN102 or EN108 or equivalency.

ENGL 2XX Intermed Expos Wrtg Competency 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Intermediate Expository Writing Competency.

ENGL 3XX Literature Competency 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required English Literature Competency.

Ethics Courses

ETHC 1XX Ethics Competency 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Ethics Competency.

Executive Leadership Courses

EXL 595 Residency 0 Cr.

EXL 610 The Science of Self – Leadership Mastery in Real Time 6 Cr.

This seminar introduces the correlation between the neuroscience of Emotional Intelligence and values-based leadership competencies. Specific instruction is given to the dimension of Leading the Self, while introducing the dimensions of Leading Others, Leading Organizations, and Leading in Service; and their associated competencies commonly correlated with successful leaders. Students expand their knowledge and familiarity with the leadership competencies associated with the science of emotional intelligence and strategic communication to more effectively lead the self and successfully engage individuals/organizations in today’s chaotic world. Students develop their understanding and application of social media and technologies to facilitate high-speed communication with their cohort on critical issues and topics developed in real-time, thereby simulating the frequent need to multitask as required in the executive arena in order to practice new skills for competency development.

EXL 620 Leading Complex Change 6 Cr.

This seminar expands student understanding and the application of Emotional Intelligence to Organizational Changes through values-based leadership competencies. Specific instruction is given to the dimensions of Leading Others and Leading Organizations to enhance awareness and capacity as a Transformational Leader. Executive Leaders are responsible for taking organizations to new levels of productivity, market presence, identity, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, and accountability to organizational values and vision. The role of the leader is in fact to lead change. This seminar addresses the processes and considerations for leading complex change initiatives in their own organization. Special attention is given to leveraging human capacity for strategic results.

EXL 630 Lead Beyond Your Organization 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses student learning on the necessity and application of leading beyond the organization, employing values-based leadership competencies. Specific instruction is given to the dimensions of Leading Organizations and Leading in Service to enlarge personal understanding of the elements contributing to organizational awareness. Students examine the value of humility, empathy and the strength of persuasive communications toward achieving sustainable outcomes aligned with the organization’s vision and strategic plan. Executive leaders must accept the role of organizational steward to ensure readiness of people and to develop a sense of community within the organization. Navigating diverse environments by calculating the risks of change initiatives and introducing innovative approaches to organizational challenges is the centerpiece of this seminar.

EXL 640 Leading With Technology 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses student learning on the necessity of Leading with Technology and Data by employing the cumulative knowledge gleaned from prior seminars. Students extend the application of values-based leadership competencies to data analytics for driving more decisions with an ever-increasing impact on complex systems. Technology is rapidly integrating with a growing amount of sensitive organizational systems and intellectual property. Therefore, this seminar addresses the leadership lens through which senior leaders must view these tools. Students develop a clear understanding of ways to apply technology and data in leveraging greater personal and organizational capacity to achieve positive results.

EXL 650 Research & Publishing Results 6 Cr.

NOTE: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

EXL 660 Exec Leadership Capstone 6 Cr.

NOTE: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

Finance Courses

FNCE 350 Fundamentals of Finance I 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to various techniques of investing and the theories, methods and procedures used to understand current complex investment/finance environments. Students explore the major financial markets, the concept of risk in financial markets, government agency regulations (including those from the Federal Reserve Bank and Securities Exchange Commission), and portfolio management theories. Basic usage of Microsoft Word and Excel is required for this course.

FNCE 351 Fundamentals in Finance II 3 Cr.

This course explores corporate finance; how capital can be raised and allocated within corporations to the advantage of corporate shareholders. Topics covered include: procedures for analyzing companies' financial data to determine how efficiently they have been run; methods for projecting funding needs based on principles of good working capital management; rules for choosing the maximal, safe, or optimal level of debt in the structure of capital used for funding company operations; and figuring the costs of the various types of funds that a company uses and its weighted average cost of capital. Prerequisite: FNCE350.

Graduate Independent Study Courses

GU 590 Selected Topics 6 Cr.

This seminar will require a student(s) to make an original, extended, and in-depth study of an approved topic within their field of study and as approved by an appropriate Program Director. This course is used most often in combination with other listed courses where the student has transferred less than six credits. Approval of the Program Director is required to take the course.

GU 599 Pre-Residency Leadership/Disaster Lab 0 Cr.

History Courses

HI 500 Writing Workshop 0 Cr.

This workshop offers students an intensive refresher course in writing fundamentals with a focus on grammar, style, editing and organization. In the second half of this workshop students are introduced to the Chicago Manual of Style system of citation, research and information literacy “best practices” and the various types of assignments and writing required in the field of history. Prerequisites: none.

HI 520 American Colonial, Revolutionary and Early National History 6 Cr.

This seminar explores American history from the era of contact through the early nineteenth century. The seminar is organized on a thematic rather than chronologic basis. It introduces students to the main themes and historiography of the period. Discussions and readings will lead students to examine areas of early seventeenth through early nineteenth-century American history and historiography.

HI 526 Hunter-Gatherer and Agrarian Eras 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the development of human civilization from dawn of human civilization and the development of agriculture to the era of European discovery and colonization of the New World. In addition to examining the forces responsible for the development of human civilization in this period, major historiographic debates, historical themes and problems will be explored.

HI 530 Nineteenth Century American History 6 Cr.

This seminar explores American history from the Early National period to the eve of the First World War. This seminar is organized on a thematic rather than chronologic basis. It introduces students to the major themes and historiographic debates of this period of U.S. history. Discussions and readings will lead students to examine areas of nineteenth-century American history and historiography.

HI 536 The Late Agrarian Era to 1800 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the development of human civilization from the late agrarian era to the beginning of the industrial revolution. In addition to examining the forces responsible for the development of human civilization in the period 1500-1800, major historiographic debates, historical themes and problems will be explored.

HI 540 Twentieth Century American History 6 Cr.

This seminar explores American history from the turn of the twentieth century and focuses on both internal developments and a greater American role in global affairs. It introduces students to main themes and historiography of the period, including the struggle for equality at home for women, immigrants and minorities, increasing American involvement in foreign conflicts, social, political and economic developments, and the relationship with the natural and built environments. Discussions and readings will lead students to examine other areas of twentieth-century American history and historiography.

HI 546 World History from 1800 to 1991 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the development of human civilization from the beginning of the industrial revolution to the end of the Cold War. In addition to examining the major forces shaping world history in this period, major historiographic debates, historical themes and problems will be explored.

HI 550 Directed Readings in History 6 Cr.

This seminar is designed to help students gain a detailed, graduate-level understanding of specific areas or topics in American or Global history and historiography that will prepare students for comprehensive examinations, capstone papers/theses, and teaching. Topics and readings are subject to the approval of the seminar’s supervising faculty members and/or Program Director.

HI 595 Residency 0 Cr.

History Courses

HIST 1XX History Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required History Competency.

HIST 210 History of US Constitution 3 Cr.

A study of the political, economic, and social contexts of the creation of the Constitution and the significant amendments to it. Emphasis is on the role of the judicial branch in constitutional matters; the effects of social change in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries; and the impact of technology on contemporary constitutional issues.

HIST 310 Historical Studies 3 Cr.

This is an overview of the historical development of political, cultural and economic behavior of institutions within a specific geographical context. Students will focus on a specific region, e.g., the Middle East, Latin America, Sub-Sahara Africa or Asia. Students will explore and develop an in-depth understand of the history of a region and the impact of that history on current events. Pre-requisites: none.

HIST 3XX History Elective 3 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists.

HIST 402 Israeli-Palestinian Conflict 3 Cr.

This course provides an engrossing exposure to the themes and complexities of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Its focus is historical and conceptual, and requires students to apply their learning through critical evaluation of contemporary events and conditions. Participants learn the conflict’s history and grapple with recurring obstacles to peace, including practical issues of security as well as abstract issues of culture, identity, and religion. Students are required to view the conflict from both national communities’ perspectives and to critically analyze different models for resolving the conflict.

HIST 411 History of Diplomacy I 3 Cr.

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview and analysis of diplomacy and international relations from 1648 to 1914. The course focuses on the historical foundations of the modern state system and on the effects of globalization and its influence on decision-making in diplomacy. The course is offered three times per year and is eight weeks in length. Prerequisite: Permission of the program manager.

HIST 412 History of Diplomacy II 3 Cr.

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview and analysis of diplomacy and international relations from 1914 to the present. The course builds on the material covered in HIST 411 – History of Diplomacy I and focuses on the historical foundations of the modern state system and on the effects of globalization and its influence on decision-making in diplomacy. The course is offered three times per year and is eight weeks in length. Prerequisite: HIST 411.

HIST 425 AmericanForeignPolicy 20thCent 3 Cr.

In this course students gain an understanding of America’s rise as a global power in the twentieth century. Topics include the strategic elements of American foreign policy in the Western Hemisphere, American neutrality and subsequent involvement in World War I and II, and challenges faced by the United States during and after the Cold War. Students examine the diplomatic, political and military aspects that determined the foreign policy of the United States as it has participated in and shaped world history. Through discussions, readings and research assignments, students have the opportunity to think critically about the major foreign policy issues of the time period.

Humanities Courses

HUMA 1XX Humanities Competency 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Fine Arts and Humanities Competency.

Independent Study Courses

INDE 490 Selected Topics 6 Cr.

Students will study a specific topic of interest under the direction of a faculty member. Pre-requisites: To be determined on an individual basis.

Info. Security & Assurance Courses

GI 512 Foundations and Historical Underpinnings of Information Assurance 6 Cr.

This seminar explores the historical foundations of information assurance from the early days of mainframes to the foundations of today’s sophisticated networks and distributed computing systems. It examines the earliest thinking about data structures and domains, interoperability between different computing platforms and mechanisms for data transfer and proceeds to the emergence of encryption as a defense against early forms of computer crime. This seminar looks at privacy, policies, and security standards and regulatory requirements. Finally, the seminar addresses the underlying models that define information assurance and takes a first look at IA architecture.

GI 522 Information Assurance Technology 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on the use of technological defenses against threats and exploitations of vulnerabilities in information systems. Topics include physical security measures, access controls, security elements of operating systems, network security measures, anti-malware tools, anti-spam measures, anti-piracy systems, software development methods supporting security, and security certifications for software products.

GI 532 Human Factors and Managing Risk 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on the ways that business objectives, user attitudes and user activities significantly influence both the development of an information assurance program and its successful implementation. The first week focuses on Operations Security and why it is the foundation for an IA program and the key to the program’s effectiveness. The following five weeks explore security awareness as a component of organizational culture: crafting the information assurance message; understanding ethical decision- making as a factor in security; understanding social psychology and how behaviors will influence the effectiveness of security activities; using employment practices and policies to support information security; and creating Acceptable Use and e-mail policies. The final four weeks examine different elements of Risk Management from basic principles through application. The NIST Special Publication 800-30 provides a solid foundation for the risk management issues. Two popular risk assessment processes, and several other processes that help identify risk will be discussed.

GI 542 Information Assurance Management and Analytics 6 Cr.

This seminar is arranged in four general areas beginning with examining and exploring the strategic and gradually narrowing down to the tactical level: Compliance -> Management, Leadership, & Policy Development -> Relationships & Adding Value -> Project Management. The curriculum explores the aspects, methods, and alternatives in information assurance management and compares/utilizes them with respect to non-IT-related management approaches and styles. Additionally, it explores alternatives in building support and consensus for projects and activities and focuses heavily on adding value to the organization. Developing an information assurance marketing plan is examined and is used to help identify techniques of improving the information assurance awareness. Analytics are explored both in terms of metrics and measuring business impact and problem solving and project management techniques and alternatives are included.

GI 551 Computer Forensic Investigations 6 Cr.

This course focuses on the spectrum of tools and techniques used to investigate digital incidents whether in a civil or criminal environment. Information assurance professionals are expected to have a broad understanding of digital incidents, their management, investigation and analysis. This seminar provides that broad understanding and places it in the context of other information assurance domains. These discussions of digital investigation and forensics cover topics from both the technical and management perspectives. This coverage aids the information assurance professional’s understanding and application of domain-specific knowledge.

GI 554 Computer Security Incident Response Team Management 6 Cr.

Students will analyze and apply the key points in creating and managing a computer security incident response team (CSIRT), also sometimes known as a computer incident response team (CIRT) or a computer emergency response team (CERT). Major topics include establishing CSIRTs; responding to computer emergencies; securing the CSIRT; managing the CSIRT with respect to professionalism, setting priorities for triage, and protecting personnel against burnout; and learning from emergencies using the incident postmortem and by establishing continuous process improvement within the organization. Students will use their case study to apply their knowledge to real-world situations and will prepare recommendations for establishment of a new CSIRT or improvement of their existing CSIRT.

GI 556 Cyber Crime 6 Cr.

This course explores the nature of conflict in cyber space focusing on two major internet-based threats to the U.S. national security: cyber terrorism and cyber crime. The course addresses questions like: who is undertaking these cyber activities, what techniques they use, and what countermeasures can be adopted to mitigate their impact. The course is built around a risk management framework to help information leaders leverage the benefits of Internet technologies while minimizing the risks that such technologies pose to their organizations.

GI 557 Cyber Law 6 Cr.

This course explores a broad variety of federal statutory, common, and international laws that may impact the information technology professional. Because the overwhelming majority of cyber infrastructure is owned and operated by the private sector, the course focus is on those laws that affect the interaction between government and the private sector information technology industry, including the privacy rights so often implicated in modern data storage systems. The seminar starts with a look at “cyber law” and whether it is really a distinct legal discipline at all. It then moves into criminal, civil, regulatory, international and common laws with which today’s information technology professional may come in contact. Throughout the course we will discuss how public policy and other factors impact the development, implementation, and interpretation of the law. Students will read, interpret and apply legal authorities and theories, a valuable skill for future information technology leaders if they are to stay in compliance with the ever-growing “cyber” legal framework.

GI 562 Vulnerability Management and Penetration Testing I 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to the penetration testing of computer networks. This is the first of two courses that address Vulnerability Management. The core of this course is the basics of penetration testing. Students utilize a virtual lab to gain experience through hands-on lab exercises. Students learn to use the well-known open-source Metasploit computer security project to understand security vulnerabilities and how to use this tool for penetration testing, testing the control tools and how to conduct monitoring of an enterprise. In the course students are introduced to: system security and vulnerability analysis, the most common system exploits and vulnerabilities, system “pivoting” and client-side exploits. In this seminar students are introduced to open-source tools, in particular, the Metasploit Framework(MSF). Students learn how to assess enterprise security controls and system vulnerability and learn to document their findings. This course is designed for penetration testers, system security and network administrators.

GI 563 Vulnerability Management II 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to advanced open-source tools used to conduct penetration testing of computer networks. This is the second of two courses that address Vulnerability Management. Students learn the rules of engagement, and how to conduct legal and ethical security tests and vulnerability assessments. Students utilize a virtual lab to gain experience through hands-on lab exercises. Students learn to use the well-known open-source tools (Metasploit , John the Ripper, Wireshark) to understand security vulnerabilities and how to use this tool for penetration testing, testing the control tools and how to conduct monitoring of an enterprise. In the course students are introduced to: system security and vulnerability analysis, the most common system exploits and vulnerabilities, system “pivoting” and client-side exploits.

GI 566 Critical Infra. Protection 6 Cr.

This course examines the security of information in computer and communications networks within infrastructure sectors critical to national security. These include the sectors of banking, securities and commodities markets, industrial supply chain, electrical/smart grid, energy, transportation, communications, water supply and health. Special attention is paid to the risk management of information in critical infrastructure environments through an analysis & synthesis of assets, threats, vulnerabilities, impacts, and countermeasures. Critical consideration is paid to the role of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems in the flow of resources such as electric, water, and fuel.

GI 567 International Perspectives on Cyberspace 6 Cr.

This course explores the concept of “cyber” and “cyberspace” from an international perspective. It starts with a look at the technical nature of the internet from its very beginning. It then moves on to explore the various threats facing all nations, including the various threat actors and their motivations, capabilities and intentions. The course then looks at how technical aspects of cyberspace complicate policing and monitoring of activities. Policies, both U.S. and international are explored next, including a look at the prospects for international cooperation. A look at cyberdeterrence and cyberwar follows, as well as a more detailed look into the cyber policies and activities of certain state and non-state actors.

GI 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Information Operations Courses

INOP 1XX Information Ops Elective 6 Cr.

INOP 302 Cyber Crime and Security 3 Cr.

This course provides an in-depth understanding of how science and technology impacts national security and intelligence. It examines how important hard science and technology is in developing areas of national security and intelligence. This includes analyzing cyber-security and cyber-warfare, the emerging relationship between the Intelligence Community (IC) and Information Technology (IT), space reconnaissance, and high-tech domestic espionage. Pre-requisites: none. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

INOP 310 Emergency & Disaster Relief 6 Cr.

This course examines how emergency managers respond to national, state, or local disasters. Students gain a broad understanding of the functions, challenges, key concepts and organizing principles of U.S. emergency management. Emphasis is placed on how emergency management is structured and organized by examining the National Response Framework (NRF), the National Incident Management System (NIMS), and the Incident Command System (ICS) as well as other standards that govern emergency management in the United States. Students will apply their learning to develop an emergency plan capable of addressing identified threats. This course requires broad knowledge, in-depth understanding, analysis, synthesis, and creativity in regard to the topics addressed. Pre-requisites: none. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

INOP 316 Info Ops & Infrastructure 3 Cr.

This course focuses on the skills required to operate a security program in an organization and the practical application of security practices. Topics include security structure, leading security projects, policy management, human factors of security, and physical security methods. Pre-requisites: none. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

Intelligence/Security Courses

INSC 1XX Intelligence/Security Elective 6 Cr.

INSC 311 Intro Homeland Security Intell 3 Cr.

This course addresses the functions of homeland security, critical infrastructure, and asset protection as they relate to government, industry, and the community. The key functions of threat prevention, crisis response, and operations recovery are addressed from a variety of perspectives given that homeland security is a responsibility that is shared by government agencies, the private sector, and individuals, encompassing a broad spectrum of professional career positions throughout our society. This course provides an overview of the elements involved in the homeland security function, as well as the challenges critical infrastructure managers in government and industry can/will face while maintaining mission operations and staff accountability in the midst of multiple overlapping roles and responsibilities in our rapidly changing world.

INSC 313 Global Security & Intelligence 3 Cr.

Students examine a range of contemporary international issues – from questions of realism versus idealism in foreign affairs to changes in the nation-state, the rise and influence of member states in the Pacific Rim, and overall global security objectives all through a historical lens. Students explore the uses of strategic intelligence by world leaders in shaping policy and the effects of strategic intelligence on world events. Students closely follow international developments and learn how to discuss them objectively and analytically. Areas of emphasis include science, technology, and globalization as the environment in which concepts of international security evolve and change over time.

INSC 315 Security Coordin&Collaboration 3 Cr.

This course focuses on the significance of sharing and coordinating information across all levels of government to support homeland security partners in preventing, protecting against, and responding to crime and terrorism. It explores the role of fusion centers and how these centers serve the specific needs of their jurisdictions while supporting the broader homeland and national security enterprise. Fusion centers overlay national intelligence with local, state, and regional information, enhancing understanding of the threat environment across all levels of government. They augment the federal government’s analytic capability and enhance situational awareness in order to protect the nation. Pre-requisites: none.

INSC 320 Intelligence Management 3 Cr.

Students develop their skills in developing and analyzing intelligence. They learn how to collaborate with public and governmental agencies to share intelligence that is critically important to improving public safety and security. Pre-requisite: None.

Interdisciplinary Studies Courses

INTD 200 The Partridge Seminar 3 Cr.

A study of Norwich University’s unique history, mission, and guiding principles that allows students to develop skills in information literacy, the writing of a research paper, and scholarly ethics. Students explore concepts such as leadership, community service, and citizenship in order to practice skills that are both embedded in the educational vision of Alden Partridge, Norwich’s founder, and that are essential to succeeding success in college and the workplace today. 3 Lecture hours per week. Pre-requisites: None. Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

INTD 310 Epistemology& CriticalThinking 6 Cr.

Students are introduced to both historical and contemporary theories of knowledge acquisition and validation. Topics covered include: empiricist vs. rationalist epistemologies; the epistemological basis of the scientific method; the interface between epistemology and neuroscience; informal logic and logical fallacies; and bias. Prerequisites: approval of the program manager. This course may not be satisfied by transfer credit.

INTD 320 The Scientific Method: Understanding the Results of Quantitative Research 6 Cr.

A study of the principles, goals, and techniques of science and scientific research. Topics covered include the epistemology of science; the origins and characteristics of the scientific method; research design and statistical tools; and science and public policy. Emphasis is placed on developing the ability to recognize valid scientific reasoning and to interpret reports of scientific research in a non-specialist manner.

INTD 400 Capstone 6 Cr.

This course is the culminating academic activity for BIS students in which they create a portfolio of previous work that demonstrates mastery of the program outcomes. They also propose, develop, and deliver a final substantive project that combines the general knowledge acquired in the core curriculum with the specific knowledge of the concentration. The final project requires students to draw upon at least two different academic disciplines for research methodology, seminal literature and sources, and intellectual frameworks to bring an interdisciplinary perspective to the subject. The capstone course may not be fulfilled through transfer credit. Prereqs: Permission of the Program Manager.

International Relations Courses

Justice Administration Courses

GJ 522 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice: Ethical Leadership and Technology 6 Cr.

TThis course focuses on the nexus and relationships among leadership, ethics, and emerging technology for criminal justice practitioners, managers and administrators. The multifaceted responsibilities of criminal justice professionals require basic knowledge of these focused competency based areas as well as of the symbiotic relationships which lead to successful policies, procedures, and practices in contemporary criminal justice organizations. Emerging technologies such as drone usage, body cameras and enhanced listening devices are explored in the context of ethical use in police interdiction and intervention.

GJ 551 Law Enforcement Administration 6 Cr.

This course examines law enforcement best practices, police leadership, workforce development, accountability, internal affairs, productivity, and managing special units. Students will also study the role of community policy, community policing, restorative justice programs, crime prevention, and the role of technology, integrated justice systems, and information system security.

GJ 552 Corrections Administration 6 Cr.

This course examines administration in the corrections environment. Topics include personnel management, budgeting and public finance, workforce development, staffing, special units, correctional policy development and planning, The role of technology and integrated justice systems are examined, as well as information system security.

GJ 556 Critical Incident Management for Public Safety 6 Cr.

This course explores public administration within the scope of critical incidents and crisis management. Among the topics to be studied are domestic terrorism and counterterrorism, the roles of the National Incident Management System and the National Response Framework, best practices for first responders, and constitutional issues related to the execution of first responder duties. Students will also study the use of specially trained and equipped units such as SWAT teams, and the role of community policing and community partnerships in responding to crises, whether manmade or natural. Prerequisites: Completion of all prior core courses in seminars one, two and three or permission of the program director.

GJ 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Leadership Courses

OL 510 Leadership Fundamentals 6 Cr.

This course focuses on differentiating the conceptual and theoretical aspects and models of leadership and leadership studies in order for students to apply leadership skills and principles to their place of work. The fundamentals of leadership are taught within the context of present and past leaders with an emphasis on how to live out these fundamentals in an ethical manner.

OL 520 Emotional Intelligence 6 Cr.

This course provides information about the new way of evaluating intelligence in individuals. This new measure of intelligence is called EQ or emotional intelligence. Students are given the opportunities and tools to evaluate their capacity to think about work through the lens of reflection and introspection as a guide to understanding the behavioral aspects of working together and providing customer service. By examining thinking patterns students will take away new skills in developing intuitive reasoning to enhance professional interpersonal relationships with peers and customers.

OL 530 Leading Change in Organizations 6 Cr.

A leader’s ability to understand and follow the change management process in a collaborative manner is a vital skill to master. This seminar focuses on the strategic leadership of change in organizations. Students learn about change from a leadership as well as a management perspective in organizations, national and multinational. This broad-based seminar differentiates the conceptual and theoretical change models in order to assist the student in understanding the best ways to lead and manage change. Students learn the importance of understanding and following the change management process in a collaborative manner. The seminar helps students learn about and practice leadership skills that foster positive changes in people and organizations.

OL 540 Strategic Communication and Information Leadership 6 Cr.

Strategic communication is a vital skill in today’s demanding, fast-paced, virtual or global workplaces. This course requires students to identify a personal leadership style, tendencies and preferences as a professional, and how one assimilates and applies information. Experiential learning is a large component of this course as students practice their skills at work and relay their experiences through a Leadership Development Portfolio (LDP).

OL 541 Hospitality Leadership Strategies 6 Cr.

This course introduces leadership practices and strategies in the expanding hospitality industry. The core of the course is the study of best practices for hospitality leadership, including the challenges of providing exceptional service with limited resources and changes to the global marketplace. Students study different types of industry best practices, focusing on internal and external stakeholder relationships, and forming strategic directions to ensure success in a chosen type of organization.

OL 542 Human Resources Leadership 6 Cr.

The focus of this seminar is on the history and evolution of human resources leadership, current trends and future needs regarding various leadership strategies utilized within a broad range of organizations. The seminar will examine the impact such factors as globalization, technology, and worker diversity have on achieving the work/life balance needs and capabilities required by organizations and individuals. The seminar also explores the role of the leader in growing its people within the organizational context to develop a value based culture capable of achieving strategic goals and objectives. Through the discussion and understanding of human resource leadership principles and personal reflection and integration, the student will gain the ability to help design, develop and construct worker based strategies at an executive level while concurrently helping workers grow and develop as individuals.

OL 543 Theories and Innovative Practices of Public Sector/Government/Military Leadership 6 Cr.

This course addresses the dynamic economic, social, and cultural transformations faced by contemporary public sector/government/military leaders as they strengthen agencies for tomorrow’s challenges. Combining the latest leadership theories of public sector/government/military leadership with the most effective lessons from the private sector, students will gain theoretical frameworks and practical tools to effectively improve and enhance their skills to manage complex systems, influence organizational context, engage stakeholders, and shape institutional culture. The topics covered include: history and theories of successful public sector/government/military management; contemporary leadership strategies; and innovative response to public sector challenges in a growing global marketplace.

OL 544 Change Management Consulting 6 Cr.

There are two foci for this seminar. The first is on providing students with the theoretical knowledge and foundation on consulting models and methodologies. The second is on providing students with the tips, tools and techniques to be a successful change management consultant.

OL 550 Strategic Organizational Behavior 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on strategic organizational behavior in organizations. Students learn about the importance of strategic alignment in order to enable effective organizational behavior. Systems thinking and organizational behavior provide a framework that the student can use both to analyze and influence the behavior of individuals and groups within the organization. This broad-based seminar analyzes and applies various holistic strategic organizational behavior models in order to assist the student in understanding the best ways to assess and impact the strategic alignment of organizations. Students learn the importance of a leader’s ability to understand and use various organizational behavior and organizational strategy models. The seminar helps students learn about and practice leadership skills that foster strategic alignment and effective behavior in people and organizations.

OL 551 Hospitality Management Systems: Leveraging Capacity in Service Organizations 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on various management systems utilized within the hospitality industry to leverage capacity to expand services via human resources and innovative knowledge management. This course introduces students to hospitality management systems and the strategies used to create an adaptive, dynamic and customer-focused hospitality organization. The course examines management tools and tactics geared to improve customer loyalty, employee satisfaction and revenue management. The core of the course is the study of best practices for hospitality management systems, and the science behind the correct utility of those systems.

OL 552 Leveraging Human Capacity for Strategic Results 6 Cr.

The focus of this seminar is on various management systems and best organizational practices to leverage human capacity to achieve strategic goals. The seminar studies how maximized utilization of human capital has become the centerpiece for success in an increasingly complex world, and how human resource leaders must confront ambitious goals while balancing a volatile economic market, environmental and legal risks, advancements in technology and workforce needs evolving at an increasingly rapid pace. The seminar will also explore various measurement tools for assessment of the efficiency and effectiveness of management systems methods for developing a blueprint for executing strategic objectives. This seminar builds on the Human Resource Leadership seminar, which was focused on developing a leadership strategy that successfully supports management systems that leverage human capacity for organizations.

OL 553 Influence in the Public Sector/Government/Military: Collaborating Across Organizational Lines 6 Cr.

This course addresses challenges faced by public sector/government/military leadership in developing collaborative relationships spanning across agency borders. Managing adaptation to changing environments and successfully dealing with multi-faceted variables using planning and control strategies, students will learn new people management strategies, implementing fundamentals of strategic and performance management, by leading effective change initiatives within an organization, and fostering teamwork by creating a work culture that values collaboration. The topics covered include: creating operational synergy, and managing internal and external stakeholder relationships to promote information sharing and create collaborative partnerships.

OL 554 Implementing Organizational Change 6 Cr.

The focus of this seminar is on moving from the theoretical realm to the practical application of implementing change initiatives. Students are presented with real-world case studies of successful and unsuccessful change management initiatives. Students analyze and synthesize cases to determine what worked and what did not work.

OL 560 Strategic Organizational Leadership & Developing a Learning Organization 6 Cr.

Students apply principles of Leading Change, Strategic Organizational Behavior and Strategic Leadership to people and organizations to impact performance and ensure future success. This seminar develops an understanding of the implications of strategic alignment and organizational learning to the organization’s success. It differentiates conceptual and theoretical change models to assist students in understanding the best ways to lead change and foster a learning organization while considering individual and group behavior as tied to strategy. The seminar demonstrates how strategic leadership, organizational behavior, and change theories are applied in a collaborative manner and will lead to aligning stakeholder’s interest. Prerequisites: OL530 and OL550 or permission of the program director.

OL 561 Capstone Studies 6 Cr.

This course in capstone studies provides students the opportunity to synthesize learning from all previous seminars and to apply the concepts and principles in two ways: the preparation of a written capstone project that offers a practical or theoretical solution to an organizational challenge or issue of contemporary importance and relevance to the work or career goals of each student; and a 1500- word paper suitable for publication in a professional journal. Students will be required to exhibit indepth critical thinking, organizational analysis, and effective writing. Course assignments will maximize the exchange of student suggestions and comments on the various stages of the capstone project, to include but not limited to topic section, thesis, resources and supporting information. Prerequisites: Completion of all prior required core and concentration courses, or permission of the program director.

OL 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Management Courses

MNGT 309 Mngt of Organizations 3 Cr.

A study of the functions of modern management: planning, organization, staffing, leading, and controlling. This study is applicable to the management of military, government, educational and non-profit, as well as business organizations. The ethical and social responsibilities of management and contemporary challenges such as the internationalization of organizations are integrated in all aspects of this course. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 311 Operations & Project Mngt 3 Cr.

This course is designed to introduce a broad overview of operations and project management, while exploring a number of important concepts critical to achieving operations and project management success. Operations management is broad in scope, encompassing products and services in a multitude of forms. These products and services range from the cars we drive, the computers we use, the Internet we access, to military operations that safeguard our county. In effect, operations management, as a field, encompasses the activities and tasks that create value for the goods and services all of us use in a variety of ways. In addition, this course will explore project management from the focus on the "nuts and bolts" or fundamentals of project management and practices, and how is supports operations management strategic goals and objectives. We'll also examine some of the key elements of project management from the project management life cycle, key processes and important tools, techniques and measurements of project. Pre-requisites: None. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 315 Leadership 3 Cr.

In this course students learn key theoretical models of leadership and apply them to a range of situations in both military and non-military organizations. Students identify key functions and skills of effective leaders, explore leadership styles through study of selected leaders and evaluate the role of communication, negotiation, strategy, purpose and ethics in leadership. Prerequisite: none.

MNGT 320 Strategic Planning 3 Cr.

This course is designed to enhance the critical and creative thinking skills needed to solve complex and ill-defined problems. The key themes are problem framing, operational art, leadership, and the outcomes for human security. Students focus on historical and contemporary examples of strategic level planning in highly complex operations and use this learning as a framework for problem solving within and across agencies. Students complete a major team project that leverages skills learned to focus on a complex problem vignette that requires creating a course of action for the leader to meet the desired end state. There are no pre-requisites.

MNGT 330 Management Information Systems 3 Cr.

Students examine the information technology solutions and systems available for use in the management of organizations. The focus will be is on what managers and executives must know and understand about technology to be successful in business. Topics covered include: the strategic use of information resources; organization and work design issues; the business of IT with a discussion of hardware and software components, database technologies, enterprise systems, telecommunications and networking, decision support systems and trends in technology; governance and projects. Emphasis is placed on the importance of information technology as an enabler for the enterprise as well as the efficient use of IT dollars in a rapidly changing world. Students conclude with an examination of the ethical and human resource challenges of the use of management information systems.

MNGT 400 Management Capstone 6 Cr.

This course is the culminating academic activity for BSMS students. Under the supervision of the instructor, students create a portfolio of work from previous courses to demonstrate achievement of the program outcomes. Students also propose, develop, and deliver a final project that combines the general knowledge acquired in the Core Courses with the specific knowledge of the Concentration area. The final project may be in the form of a business or strategic plan, a formal proposal in response to an RFP, a research study of a management or leadership problem, or other type of substantive project. This course may not be fulfilled through transfer credit. Prerequisite: successful completion of all BSMS core and concentration courses or permission of the Program Manager.

MNGT 401 Sem in Leadership I:Fundamntls 6 Cr.

This course focuses on differentiating the conceptual and theoretical aspects and models of leadership and leadership studies. The fundamentals of leadership are taught within the context of present and past leaders, with an emphasis on how to practice these fundamentals in an ethical manner.

MNGT 402 Sem in Leadership II Styles EQ 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on differentiating the conceptual and theoretical aspects and models of Emotional Intelligence (EQ). The course provides students the opportunity to explore the key EQ skills that contribute to a leader’s success. Through the course, students build a foundational understanding of EQ by exploring emotions, behavior, and EQ history. Students learn about the skills, attitudes, and behaviors of people with high (or varying degrees) of EQ, as well as how individuals can cultivate those skills.

MNGT 403 Leadership of Change 3 Cr.

This course is a study of change management principles and best practices from a leadership vantage point. Emphasis is on the process of planning for change and the critical role of communication before, during, and after change. Students develop instruments for measuring the impact of change on human and financial resources within organizations.

MNGT 404 Leadershp in Tech-Driven World 3 Cr.

This course focuses on the application of leadership principles toward efforts to manage the impact of modern information and communication technologies on organizations. Topics include: creating and leading a remote workforce; human behavior in technology-mediated work relationships; and ethical issues arising from the use of technology.

MNGT 411 Seminar Public Sector Mngt I 6 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 412 Seminar Public Sector Mngt II 6 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 413 Ethics in Public Sector Mngt 3 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 414 Legal and Regulatory Envrnmnt 3 Cr.

MNGT 421 Sem in Human Resource Mngt I 6 Cr.

The first of two seminars focusing on a comprehensive examination of the key functional areas of HR. Students analyze the first 9 of the 15 Human Resources (HR) Functional Areas of knowledge and apply them in case studies to design enterprise HR solution for the organization.

MNGT 422 Sem in Human Resource Mngt II 6 Cr.

The second of two seminars focused on a comprehensive examination of the key functional areas of HR. Students analyze the final 6 of the 15 Human Resources (HR) Functional Areas of knowledge of HR and apply them in case studies to design enterprise HR solution for an organization.

MNGT 423 Human Capital Planning 3 Cr.

The course enhances student understanding of Human Capital Management (HCM) in organizations to help them be effective Human Resources (HR) professionals and strategic partners. The focus is on the essential practices of HCM and how these practices impact organizational goals. Students examine HCM practices such as workforce analytics, workforce planning, talent management, and performance management. They learn to apply HR metrics to demonstrate the impact HR has on the achievement of goals. 3 lecture hours. Pre-Reqs: MNGT 421, MNGT 422.

MNGT 424 Strategic Role of HRM in Organizations 3 Cr.

Students build upon the traditional foundations of Human Resource Management by synthesizing and applying them in the strategic planning and goals of organizations to help achieve competitive advantage. Topics analyzed from a strategic vantage point include advanced employment law and processes, staff training and development, and strategic performance management. 3 lecture hours. Pre-reqs: MNGT 421, MNGT 422.

MNGT 431 Seminar in Technology Mngt I 6 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 432 Seminar in Technology Mngt II 6 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 433 Project Management I 3 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 434 Project Management II 3 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 441 Public Procurement and Contracting 6 Cr.

The student examines the scope, methods, and processes of forming contracts between public and private parties for the purpose of accomplishing the missions of governmental agencies at the international, federal, state/provincial and local level. It is designed for individuals considering a career in public administration, persons employed in government agencies, public procurement personnel wishing to enhance their knowledge, and suppliers or citizens interested in learning more about the formulation of government contracts. Subject and foundational areas such as contract monitoring, contract administration ethics, and of the legal basis of the public procurement function will be examined and explored. Pre-req: None.

MNGT 442 Public Procurement and Strategic Planning 6 Cr.

Student examines the scope, methods and processes of forming contracts between public and private parties for the purpose of accomplishing the missions of governmental agencies at the international, federal, state/provincial and local level from a strategic planning vantage. It is designed for individuals considering a career in public administration, persons employed in government agencies, public procurement personnel wishing to enhance their knowledge, and suppliers or citizens interested in learning more about the formulation of government contracts. Subject and foundational areas such as procurement strategic planning, risk management and procurement ethics will be examined and explored as it relates to the public procurement function. Pre-req: MNGT 441 (C or better).

MNGT 475 Project Management Fundamentals 3 Cr.

Focus is on the fundamentals of project management and practices and preparation for Project Management Institute (PMI) certification. Students explore the key elements of project management from teh project management framework, the project life cycle, project process and key project management knowledge areas. Additionally, project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, resource and schedule management are studied. Other key areas of focus are project management procurement and overall project communications requirements. 3 cr.

MNGT 476 Project Management Advanced Techniques 3 Cr.

Builds on and finalizes the foundtational material on project management principles, practices, and processes covered in MNGT 475: Project Management Fundamentals. Students focus on the critical PM components of project management leadership, effective communications, and the management of project teams. 3 cr. Pre-req: MNGT 475.

Mathematics Courses

MATH 1XX Math Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Basic College Mathematics Competency.

MATH 232 Elementary Statistics 3 Cr.

A course that covers the study of frequency distributions, averages and standard deviations, normal curve, probability, decision-making, sampling techniques, testing hypotheses, chi-square, students-t and F-distributions, correlation and linear regression. Prerequisite: A college level mathematics course or equivalent as determined by departmental placement testing.

MATH 2XX Math Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Intermediate College Mathematics Competency.

Military History Courses

MH 510 Introduction to Military History: Historiography and Method 6 Cr.

The first seminar examines how military history developed as a distinct discipline, and will train you in the "tools of the trade": historiography and methodology. Historiography, or the art of practicing history as a distinct discipline, is an examination of the history of historical thought, from the first works of history in the classical world to the present time. The seminar will cover some of the varied historiographical schools and concepts that have evolved. Historical methodology and informational literacy will also be studied. How do historians gather information and formulate hypotheses? The development of research methods, including the use of primary and secondary sources, are discussed. History involves interpretation; the role of objectivity, selectivity, and bias are examined.

MH 520 Global Military History to 1800 6 Cr.

This seminar explores the military history of the United States and Europe from classical Greece to the 19th century. The emphasis is on the "Western Way of War" as defined by historians Geoffrey Parker and Victor Davis Hanson. In virtually every conflict between Western states and non-Western powers, from the Persian Wars through the colonial era, the west has emerged victorious. Are there experiences and characteristics that have distinguished warfare in the West from the rest of the world? Other prominent military historians, including John Lynn, have challenged the notion that a distinct, continuous Western Way of War exists. The seminar consists of an in-depth examination of these conflicting interpretations of military history and the major themes in the military history of the West.

MH 530 Military Thought and Theory 6 Cr.

This seminar studies the most influential military theoreticians and strategists from the period of the Thirty Years War to the present day. Students will examine the theories of Clausewitz, Jomini, Douhet, Mahan, Corbett, and Mao Tse-Tung. This seminar also examines theories of deterrence and nuclear war as well as post-Maoist revolutionary warfare.

MH 540 Non-Western Military History 6 Cr.

This seminar will present an introduction to Non-Western military history, covering a wide range of topics including military thought, strategy and tactics, technologies, and cultural factors as they pertained to the waging of war. Non-Western military history is rapidly maturing as a field of scholarly inquiry, particularly with respect to Asia. Therefore, this seminar will introduce students to the latest scholarship and interpretations, which both challenge and complement aspects of the debates about Western superiority mentioned above. Due to the wider availability of source materials and the research expertise of the seminar designer, this seminar will devote more attention to East Asia than to other parts of the non-Western world. Nevertheless, weekly lessons will be arranged topically and will in many cases encompass a variety of geographical areas. Students will be strongly encouraged to think comparatively throughout the class. Students will be challenged to determine if any society had definitely unique approaches to warfare or if the universals are far more important than the specifics.

MH 541 Chinese Military History 6 Cr.

This seminar will provide an introduction to Chinese military history, covering a wide range of topics including military thought, strategy and tactics, technologies, and cultural factors as they pertained to the waging of war. This offering will introduce students to the latest scholarship and interpretations, which both challenge and complement aspects of the debates about the “Western way of war.” Students will be strongly encouraged to think comparatively throughout the class. In the process we will attempt to determine if any society had definitely unique approaches to warfare or if the universals are far more important than the specifics.

MH 543 Amphibious Warfare 6 Cr.

This seminar examines amphibious operations from antiquity to the present. It also sketches broader contexts for amphibious warfare as it has affected political, diplomatic, and economic change by determining to what degree, if at all, various amphibious actions figured in what has been labeled as an early-modern “military revolution” that contributed to the “Rise of the West.”.

MH 550 U.S. Military History 6 Cr.

This seminar will present an introduction to American military history from the colonial era to the present. Students will be challenged to critically evaluate Russell Weigley's "American Way of War" thesis and examine the impact American conflicts and the U.S. military has had an American Society.

MH 551 Race and Gender in Military History 6 Cr.

This seminar will cover the complex issues surrounding racial integration in military institutions, including intriguing questions around citizenship and ethnicity. Students will also examine the history of women's participation in warfare and issues of gender integration in the military.

MH 552 Total War 6 Cr.

This seminar will examine the origins of the concept and practice of “total war” in the period from the French Revolution to the end of the Cold War. The French Revolution, Napoleonic Wars, American Civil War, First World War and Second World War will be examined. Students will examine the evolution of modern war, the characteristics of “total war” as well as the usefulness of the concept of “total war” in describing these massive conflicts.

MH 562 Capstone Paper 6 Cr.

Norwich requires a "Capstone Paper" that must be written and submitted during the latter part of Seminar 6. The Capstone has all the elements of the traditional thesis, including a program-approved topic of the student's own choosing to be explored in depth, the use of appropriate academic sources.

MH 569 Comprehensive Exam 0 Cr.

This degree completion exercise is designed to assess students’ knowledge of military history in general and the specific sub-fields they have studied during their program of study. The goal of the written examination is to assess student knowledge in the field of military history gained during the students’ program of study. In each examination students must demonstrate graduate level knowledge of the pertinent historiography of the field(s) examined in their course of study, graduate level analysis, an ability to synthesize information from various scholarly sources and develop and defend their interpretation of historical events. Students must also make a credible case regarding their argument’s historical and historiographic significance. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Seminars 1-6. Additional fees may apply.

MH 570 M.A. Thesis 3 Cr.

Thesis I is the first of two required seminars for the thesis project in the MMH and MAH programs. Students will conduct primary and secondary source research and write drafts of their thesis under the guidance of a faculty thesis advisor. Students pursuing a research question requiring primary and/or secondary sources in one or more foreign languages must demonstrate advanced reading proficiency in the pertinent foreign language(s). External assessment such as the Defense Language Proficiency Examinations, Foreign Service Institute examination or reading comprehension tests approved by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages will be used to assess foreign language proficiency. If required for the research project, proof of foreign language competency must accompany the petition for the thesis option. Thesis and additional fees will be applied. Prerequisites: approval of Program Director, Associate Program Director for Academics and Capstone Director, successful completion of Seminars 1-5, and, if applicable, advanced reading knowledge of the pertinent foreign language(s).

MH 571 MA Thesis II 3 Cr.

The second of two required seminars for the thesis project. Students will continue their research related to their M.A. thesis and will write a final version of the thesis under the guidance of their thesis advisor. Upon approval of the thesis advisor, the student will submit their thesis to their thesis committee and schedule an oral defense with his/her advisor and MMH/MAH thesis readers. A successful oral defense and final manuscript meeting the approval of a majority of the thesis committee will result in a grade of S (Satisfactory). Prerequisites: grade of SP in MH570: Thesis I.

MH 595 Residency 0 Cr.

MH 697 Staff Ride 0 Cr.

National Security Studies Courses

NTSS 400 Natl Security Studies Capstone 6 Cr.

The culminating academic activity for BS National Security Studies (NSS) students. Under the supervision of the instructor, students create a portfolio of work from previous courses to demonstrate achievement of the program outcomes. Students also analyze and synthesize program learning with a particular focus on ethics and leadership. Students analyze ethical scenarios and a tactical ethics text and present an in-depth ethical analysis paper. Students must address how their work will contribute to the security of national objectives as they pertain to the topics under discussion throughout the entirety of the program. Pre-req: successful completion of all core courses or permisson of the Program Manager.

Nursing Courses

NR 510 Health Systems Analysis Policy, Environment, and Structure 6 Cr.

This seminar presents a global perspective of the healthcare system. Content includes an historical overview of healthcare systems in the United States, issues of cost, quality and access, as well as trends, such as, cultural diversity, demographic shifts, economics, technological influences and ethical issues impacting health care delivery. The student will gain the essential understanding of the continuum of care and examine the impact of integrated delivery systems on care delivery processes and patient outcomes.

NR 512 Advanced Nursing Care in the Delivery of Healthcare 6 Cr.

This seminar represents the foundation of graduate level nursing education. It provides a global perspective of the healthcare system and helps the student assess and analyze the healthcare system as the context for graduate level nursing practice. The relationship among various stakeholders including consumers, providers, regulatory agencies and policy makers are explored as well as their impact on healthcare delivery. This seminar also emphasis health policy and advocacy, interprofessional collaboration, and clinical prevention and population health. Analysis of the advanced nursing role is conducted within the context of the healthcare system in relationship with complex social, economic, technological, legal, ethical and political environments.

NR 520 Theoretical Constructs for Leadership Roles in Nursing 6 Cr.

This seminar prepares the student with the theoretical foundation to function in management level nursing roles across a variety of nursing specialties and health care settings. The student will be prepared to understand, evaluate, and utilize appropriate theories within his/her own practice. Theoretical constructs will include nursing and other relevant theories from the social, organizational, and behavioral sciences. Specific theories addressed include: systems, change, nursing management, and leadership theories, as well as ethical principles in health care and professional role development. Theoretical concepts are augmented by individual projects that require the student to examine his/her practice setting using the above constructs.

NR 522 Translating and Integrating Scholarship into Practice 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the application and integration of evidence in leadership roles and decision making. The student explores nursing and other relevant theories from the social, organizational, and behavioral sciences to provide a theoretical foundation for evidence-based practice. The student is equipped to critically appraise and utilize research, identify researchable problems within his/her practice setting, and lead teams toward integration of evidence-based practice in healthcare. Translational science and implementation/improvement science is introduced. The seminar concludes with a brief overview of innovation and its relevance to advanced nursing roles. The student participates in a mentored practicum of 100 hours. This practicum experience provides the student with an opportunity to apply and integrate relevant evidence in their practice and develop reflective practices and appreciative inquiry. Prerequisite: NR 512.

NR 530 Evidence-Based Practice 6 Cr.

This seminar prepares the student to become proficient in the utilization of research, the critical evaluation of research, identification of researchable problems within a variety of practice settings, and the application of research to clinical problems. The course incorporates both quantitative and qualitative research methods, application of statistical analysis of data, the utilization of information systems for accessing, storing and analyzing data, identification of researchable clinical problems, critical analysis and application of existing research, and application of theoretical constructs to frame a research proposal. Class assignments related to evidence based practice are augmented as the student identifies a researchable nursing problem within his/her own practice setting and develops a related research proposal.

NR 531 Clinical Concepts: Advanced Pathophysiology 3 Cr.

This seminar may be taken at any point during the latter half of the Master’s program, either concurrently with one of the other seminars or after completion of the 6-seminar concentration. It will satisfy the requirements of some states (e.g., Texas and California) that stipulate advanced coursework in pharmacology, pathophysiology, and health assessment for nurse educators. The course will focus on the pathophysiology, assessment, and evidence based interventions of select acute and chronic conditions across the lifespan. This course will expand on undergraduate level knowledge of disease entities commonly found in patient populations cared for by students.

NR 532 Quality Improvement, Informatics & Healthcare Technologies 6 Cr.

This seminar introduces the student to the fundamentals of quality improvement science, and the use, implementation and impact of informatics and healthcare technologies on quality and safety in healthcare. Students examine quality improvement models in the delivery of healthcare and measures for quality improvement initiatives. The business case for quality is discussed as well as leadership and teambuilding for quality improvement in a continuous learning organization. The student conducts a microsystem analysis and prepares a performance improvement project proposal. The student participates in a mentored practicum of 100 hours. This practicum experience provides the student with the opportunity to conduct a clinical microsystem analysis, participate in a quality improvement project and develop reflective practices and appreciative inquiry. Prerequisites: NR 512 and NR 522.

NR 540 The Heath Care Organization: Behavior and Development 6 Cr.

This seminar prepares the student to incorporate systems theory as a basis of understanding the impact of market forces on health care delivery. Course content includes theories of leadership and organizational behavior, design and culture as well as group dynamics (i.e., communication, conflict, negotiation). In addition,, concepts which focus on governance, decision making, performance improvement will be discussed. Class work is augmented by case studies and individual project work that require the students to examine practices in their own organizations.

NR 541 Clinical Concepts: Advanced Pharmacology 3 Cr.

This seminar focuses on clinical applications of pharmacotherapeutic agents used in the care of patients. The seminar content is designed to build on prior pharmacological study of actions and effects of drugs on the human system across life span. Students will study pharmacologic mechanisms of action, effects on organ systems, routes of administration, pharmacokinetics, therapeutic uses, considerations related to age and physiological state, adverse reactions, contracindications, and regulatory issues related to nursing education practice.

NR 542 Clinical Concepts: Advanced Health Assessment 3 Cr.

This seminar will focus on advanced clinical history taking and physical assessment for patients across the lifespan, Course content focuses on concepts, theory and practice of comprehensives health histories and assessments for patients of all ages and states of health. Both components will require a comprehensive examination: a proctored paper and pencil exam for pharmacology and a videotaped health assessment demonstration for the latter portion of the seminar.

NR 543 Clinical Concepts: Pathophysiology for Disease Management 4 Cr.

Students examine pathophysiological processes integral to the understanding of human health conditions and disorders of children and adults. Objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptation are assessed and analyzed. Assessment findings, diagnostic testing, and interventions for specific health problems are discussed. Pharmacologic treatments for specific health problems are explored. The etiology, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of disorders are reviewed within the context of age and gender. Principles of pathophysiology are applied to recognize clinical signs and symptoms consistent with human health conditions and disorders during case study presentations and discussions. The impact of health promotion and disease prevention on pathophysiological processes across the lifespan are explored.

NR 544 Clinical Concepts: Advanced Pathophysiology for Disease Management I 2 Cr.

Students examine pathophysiological processes integral to the understanding of human health conditions and disorders of children and adults. Objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptation are assessed and analyzed. Assessment findings, diagnostic testing, and interventions for specific health problems are discussed. Pharmacologic treatments for specific health problems are explored. The etiology, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of disorders are reviewed within the context of age and gender. Principles of pathophysiology are applied to recognize clinical signs and symptoms consistent with human health conditions and disorders during case study presentations and discussions. The impact of health promotion and disease prevention on pathophysiological processes across the lifespan are explored.

NR 545 Clinical Concepts: Pathophysiology for Disease Managment II 2 Cr.

Students examine pathophysiological processes integral to the understanding of human health conditions and disorders of children and adults. Objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptation are assessed and analyzed. Assessment findings, diagnostic testing, and interventions for specific health problems are discussed. Pharmacologic treatments for specific health problems are explored. The etiology, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of disorders are reviewed within the context of age and gender. Principles of pathophysiology are applied to recognize clinical signs and symptoms consistent with human health conditions and disorders during case study presentations and discussions. The impact of health promotion and disease prevention on pathophysiological processes across the lifespan are explored.

NR 546 Leadership in Healthcare Organizations 6 Cr.

Students explore organizational science and its application to healthcare. Each student analyzes the principles of leadership and leadership science including theory, styles as well as contemporary approaches and strategies. The seminar emphasizes system science and integration, change theory and social change theories, and healthcare systems and organizational relationships. The student has the opportunity through case studies and a seminar project to address an organization’s challenges specific to healthcare delivery within the contemporary financial and social environment. The student participates in a mentored practicum of 100 hours. This practicum experience provides the student with the opportunity to address organizational challenges and develop reflective practices and appreciative inquiry.

NR 547 Theoretical and Practice Foundations of Nursing Informatics 6 Cr.

This seminar addresses the foundational concepts of Nursing Informatics and provides the student with the opportunity to apply these concepts to the development of a Nursing Informatics project. This seminar also includes reviewing information exchange standards, methods and models of care. Students address communication and conflict resolution techniques as they create change in the process of developing their project and identify and apply data analysis principles. Students participate in a mentored practicum of 100 hours during which the student completes the seminar’s experiential learning assignments which is their Nursing Informatics project. This practicum experience introduces the student to specialized roles in that support improved patient outcomes and the opportunity to develop reflective practices and appreciative inquiry. Students incorporate practice standards, quality improvement processes, regulatory and accreditation standards as well as ethical practices into their project.

NR 550 Nursing Resource Management 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on the critical aspects of human and financial resource management. Human resource management including hiring practices, disciplinary action, and performance appraisal and performance improvement are examined in this seminar. Healthcare finance incorporating nursing unit based budget preparation, management control systems, and operations management are addressed. In addition, quality improvement, risk management and marketing are explored in this seminar. The student is expected to utilize his/her workplace environment for the exploration, development and application of the course objectives.

NR 551 Theoretical Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction 6 Cr.

This seminar prepares students to apply theoretical concepts related to education and nursing to the development and implementation of curricula. Topics will include history of curriculum in nursing, theories of teaching and learning, instructional design theory and method, technology in education, learner diversity, and curriculum development, A precepted practicum experience will coincide with didactic coursework. Students will choose a preceptor in an educational role who can facilitate role development and the implementation of the students’ work. Students will be required to develop a curriculum for a course or unit of study and implement a portion of the course or program using technology. Student work will become part of the student’s portfolio and shared with peers in the electronic classroom.

NR 555 Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Healthcare 6 Cr.

This MSN elective is designed for nurse leaders who are interested in the entrepreneurial process and acquiring innovative knowledge and skills within the context of the healthcare environment. The student is introduced to definitions and concepts that pertain to innovation, including different types of innovation and entrepreneurship as well as individual-level, organizational and institutional factors that impact the healthcare innovation process. The course examines how entrepreneurs and healthcare organizations create and capture value through sustainable innovation that meet consumer and societal needs. It explores various approaches employed by entrepreneurial healthcare organizations and considers the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to succeed in today’s competitive and global environment. Through real-world examples, the student has the opportunity to evaluate innovative healthcare ventures and viable business models for different kinds of healthcare innovations. The student participates in a 100 hour mentored practicum to apply learned concepts to practice. This practicum experience provides the student with an opportunity to explore self-awareness, reflective practices and appreciative inquiry.

NR 556 Healthcare Resource Management 6 Cr.

Students examine the critical aspects of human and financial resource management in the context of healthcare systems. Human resource management includes confronting the nursing shortage through recruitment and retention, staffing management, performance appraisal and marketing. Prevention of workplace violence and disaster preparedness are also explored as opportunities and challenges for nurse leaders in managing the healthcare workforce. Healthcare finance resource management incorporates nursing unit based budget preparation, management control systems, and operations management. The student utilizes his/her healthcare organization for the exploration, development and application of the seminar’s objectives. The student participates in a mentored practicum of 100 hours. This practicum experience introduces the student to human and financial resource management in the health care environment as well as develop reflective practices and appreciative inquiry.

NR 557 Strategic Planning and Practice Applications in Nursing Informatics 6 Cr.

Building on the theoretical foundations addressed in NR547, this seminar examines the practice applications related to strategic planning and implementation of an informatics system in a healthcare organization. Topics include an overview of data analytics, facilitating and assessing learning in non-academic healthcare settings. Students examine a number of factors that impact the success of a system implementation while considering technical standards, system analysis concepts and data management. Students participate in a mentored practicum of 100 hours during which the student completes the seminar’s experiential learning assignments which is their Nursing Informatics project. This practicum experience introduces the student to specialized roles in that support improved patient outcomes and the opportunity to develop reflective practices and appreciative inquiry.

NR 560 Strategic Management in the Nursing Environment 6 Cr.

This seminar is the capstone course in the Master of Science in Nursing-concentration in Nursing Administration. The seminar consists of two integrated components: 1) online-classes, consisting of study and discussions related to the development of a learning contract, concepts related to strategic management and professional practice; 2) a 60-hour, self-directed administrative practicum to implement the learning contract objectives. Discussions will relate to the acquisition of the necessary tools for successful practice as a Master’s prepared nurse administrator. This culminating experience is designed to enable students to apply the knowledge and skills learned throughout the graduate program and to guide their future career goals.

NR 561 Scholarship of Teaching, Learning, and Evaluation 6 Cr.

This seminar prepares students to measure and assess learners in a variety of nursing contexts (e.g., clinical evaluation, via simulation) as well as evaluate curriculum on the program level. Foundations of educational measurement and evaluation , learner assessment, objective development, the evaluation of critical thinking as well as the context of nursing education will be discussed. Students will take part in a concurrent precepted practicum in which they will be required to engage in clinical education and evaluation of learners, as well as the development of assessment strategies for previously developed curriculum. Students will have an opportunity to reflect on the multiple roles of the nurse educator in practice. Prerequisites: completion of NR 510, 520, 530, 541, 551, and national certification in an area of specialty nursing practice, or permission of the Program Director.

NR 566 Strategic Planning and Management in Healthcare 6 Cr.

NR 566 is the capstone for the Master of Science in Nursing program, concentration in Healthcare Systems Leadership. The seminar emphasizes strategic planning in healthcare, business planning and conceptual analysis of role. Discussion focuses on the acquisition of knowledge, skills and abilities (KSA) for strategic planning and for practice as a nurse leader across traditional and non-traditional healthcare settings. This capstone experience is designed so that students may apply the necessary KSA learning throughout the graduate program to guide his/her future career development. The student participates in a mentored practicum of 100 hours. This practicum experience supports the student in integrating learned knowledge, skills and abilities in the health care environment as well as develop reflective practices and appreciative inquiry.

NR 567 Using Informatics to improve Nursing Practice 6 Cr.

This seminar reviews concepts that are important to implementing and sustaining effective use of technology in the clinical environment. Security and privacy for the protection of privileged information, effective policy development, testing and implementation are examined. Concepts of change management as well as informatics role in community/population health monitoring and management are explored. Students will study the use of technology to generate new evidence, the potential influence of emerging technologies on clinical practice and the importance of developing a caring practice in a high technology environment. Students will participate in a mentored practicum of 100 hours during which the student completes the seminar’s experiential learning assignments which is their Nursing Informatics project. This practicum experience introduces the student to specialized roles in that support improved patient outcomes and the opportunity to develop reflective practices and appreciative inquiry.

NR 571 ClinicalConceptsADV Pathophys1 1 Cr.

Students examine pathophysiological processes integral to the understanding of human health conditions and disorders of children and adults. Objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptation are assessed and analyzed. Assessment findings, diagnostic testing, and interventions for specific health problems are discussed. Pharmacologic treatments for specific health problems are explored. The etiology, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of disorders are reviewed within the context of age and gender. Principles of pathophysiology are applied to recognize clinical signs and symptoms consistent with human health conditions and disorders during case study presentations and discussions. The impact of health promotion and disease prevention on pathophysiological processes across the lifespan are explored. Note: This course is under development and will be approved by the University Curriculum Committee by Dec. 2018.

NR 572 ClinicalConceptsADV Pathophys2 1 Cr.

Students examine pathophysiological processes integral to the understanding of human health conditions and disorders of children and adults. Objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptation are assessed and analyzed. Assessment findings, diagnostic testing, and interventions for specific health problems are discussed. Pharmacologic treatments for specific health problems are explored. The etiology, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of disorders are reviewed within the context of age and gender. Principles of pathophysiology are applied to recognize clinical signs and symptoms consistent with human health conditions and disorders during case study presentations and discussions. The impact of health promotion and disease prevention on pathophysiological processes across the lifespan are explored. Note: This course is under development and will be approved by the University Curriculum Committee by Dec. 2018.

NR 573 ClinicalConcept ADV Pathophys3 1 Cr.

Students examine pathophysiological processes integral to the understanding of human health conditions and disorders of children and adults. Objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptation are assessed and analyzed. Assessment findings, diagnostic testing, and interventions for specific health problems are discussed. Pharmacologic treatments for specific health problems are explored. The etiology, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of disorders are reviewed within the context of age and gender. Principles of pathophysiology are applied to recognize clinical signs and symptoms consistent with human health conditions and disorders during case study presentations and discussions. The impact of health promotion and disease prevention on pathophysiological processes across the lifespan are explored. Note: This course is under development and will be approved by the University Curriculum Committee by Dec. 2018.

NR 574 ClinicalConceptsADV Pathophys4 1 Cr.

Students examine pathophysiological processes integral to the understanding of human health conditions and disorders of children and adults. Objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptation are assessed and analyzed. Assessment findings, diagnostic testing, and interventions for specific health problems are discussed. Pharmacologic treatments for specific health problems are explored. The etiology, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of disorders are reviewed within the context of age and gender. Principles of pathophysiology are applied to recognize clinical signs and symptoms consistent with human health conditions and disorders during case study presentations and discussions. The impact of health promotion and disease prevention on pathophysiological processes across the lifespan are explored. Note: This course is under development and will be approved by the University Curriculum Committee by Dec. 2018.

NR 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Philosophy Courses

PHLS 1XX Philosophy Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Ethics Competency.

PHLS 205 Critical Thinking 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the critical thinking skills and techniques needed in academic and research endeavors. Topics covered include formal and informal logic; the structure of logical systems; argumentation; and the relationship of logic to research and the scientific method. Emphasis is placed on learning to recognize common logical fallacies.

PHLS 210 Ethics in the Modern World 3 Cr.

A study of ethics and its application to problems in everyday life, society, and the broader world. The course examines the principal moral theories and ethical systems that have shaped our personal values and behavior, including consequentialist and non-consequentialist theories, virtue ethics, and feminist ethics. Students explore the connections between ethics and religion and examine the challenges to morals posed by relativism, subjectivism and emotivism, and egoism. Students also evaluate positions, theories, and arguments as they apply them to concrete matters of personal, socio-political, and global concern.

PHLS 324 Criminal Justice Ethics 3 Cr.

This course provides a short introduction to general ethics, with applications to practices and problems in the criminal justice field. It uses the case study method to focus on immediate decisions which involve ethical dilemmas and typically face criminal justice professionals in the police, courts, and corrections. It also studies a selection of more general issues involving the criminal justice system which are of common public concern, as well as the deeper question of why certain forms of behavior should or should not be criminalized. In this connection, a selection of recent high-profile Supreme and Appeals Court cases in the areas of civil rights and civil liberties will be discussed. The emphasis is on developing discussion skills and familiarity with essential patterns of legal and moral reasoning. This course satisfies the University's General Education Ethics requirement. 3 lecture hours.

Political Science Courses

POLS 1XX Political Science Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Social Science Competency.

POLS 302 National Security Policy 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the issues and institutions of national security policy. Successful students will have an appreciation of strategic thought and strategy formulation, the ability to assess national security issues and threats, and an understanding of the political and military institutions involved in the making and execution of national security policy. Pre-requisites: none.

POLS 306 Comparative Politics 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the basic methods, concepts and substance of comparative politics. Special attention will be paid to institutions and behaviors as well as development and modernization theories. The course provides students with tools to address such questions as: What is a political system? What are the different varieties of democracies and authoritarian regimes? Are some regimes more vulnerable to political violence than others? What explains the transition from authoritarianism to democracy and can that process be reversed? How does geography impact the political, economic, and social development of a region? Pre- requisites: none.

POLS 316 Domestic Terrorism 3 Cr.

This course traces the history, emergence, and growth of domestic terrorist and extremist groups within the United States. Students will assess various groups' intentions, capabilities, and activities within contexts of and ramifications on political, national security, and legal paradigms. Topics include current and active domestic groups and their organizational structure, philosophies, and networks. Pre-requisites: none.

POLS 318 International Terrorism 3 Cr.

This course addresses the effects of a variety of forms of sub-state violence on world affairs. Topics include sources of terrorism, its major characteristics, the problems it poses for global peace and stability, responses to terrorism by countries and international organizations, and the problem of balancing public safety and personal freedom in dealing with terrorism. Pre-requisites: none.

Public Administration Courses

AD 511 Foundations of Public Administration and Policy 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to public administration in the United States. The course focuses on governance, inter-governmental relationships, organizational theory, policies, and strategic planning as affected by fiscal constraints, public needs, social change and politics. Students are introduced to the role of leadership, the necessity for professional ethics and accountability, and personal competence. Students also begin the program-long requirement of developing their skills of critical analysis, research, integration of information, and effective writing.

AD 521 Public Administration Research and Analysis 6 Cr.

This course reviews major research method designs and their application to policy development and evaluation. Students are also exposed to statistical techniques commonly found in public administration and social science research from the perspective of managerial control and application to evaluation of research design/program evaluation. Particular focus is placed on quality assurance and best- evidence management.

AD 531 Public Organization Resources & Processes 6 Cr.

This course explores three areas of public administration; the legal environment for the public organization, human resources, and organizational leadership. The first part of the course focuses on creating agency authority, public participation, civil liability, employment law, and due process. The second part of the course focuses on selecting and retaining quality employees and managers, evaluations, coaching and training. The third part of the course focuses on strategic leadership, organizational analysis and culture, managing conflict, and organizational vision and change.

AD 542 Leading the Nonprofit Organization 6 Cr.

This course explores the broad scope of leadership responsibilities challenging senior leaders within the nonprofit sector. Among the topics to be studied are strategic planning, fundraising, stakeholder engagement, governance, marketing, and performance management. Students will also examine trends in social entrepreneurship and the use of technology, such as social media, that are transforming the field. The course focuses on developing flexible leadership skills that can be applied in a variety of settings, across the life cycle of both small and large scale nonprofit organizations.

AD 543 Municipal Governance 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to the work of local government managers in the United States. The core of the course is the study of best practices for municipal leadership, including the challenges of providing direction to a wide scope of departments and agencies necessary to serve the needs of communities. Students will also study how to create and maintain intergovernmental relationships and form partnerships with elected officials, staff employees such as directors, managers, and department heads, private sector businesses, bargaining units, citizens and representatives of the media.

AD 544 Strategies and Principles for Sustainability I 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to the principles and strategies of sustainability as it applies to public works services in the community. Specifically, the course will present students with a study of: 1) The connections between the environment and mankind, 2) How air and water pollution affect public health, 3) The impact to the economy when water and transportation policies are not well thought out, 4) The importance of using long-term economic models in public policy decision making, 5) Learning how to think in a holistic manner, 6) The attributes of a sustainable work culture, and 7) How to build community support for a sustainable program.

AD 545 Policy, Politics, and Planning 6 Cr.

This introduced students to the impact of politics on the policy-making process, the basics of policy analysis, and the interdependence of public policy and planning. The course applies basic methods for analyzing and resolving planning and policy issues. Using the lab, students start with Excel and simple analysis and move to SPSS. Exposure to research methods and techniques will ensure that all students understand the basics of the impact of politics on policy and planning, and principles of applying these two basic tools.

AD 552 Nonprofit Administration 6 Cr.

This course of study focuses on the administration and management of tax-exempt organizations that derive their funding and mandates from individuals, foundations, and governmental sources. Topics include the legal framework of nonprofit organizations, organizational design, fiscal management, fundraising, grants, contracts, assessment and planning. Students will study best practices for leadership and management, nonprofit governance, and the effective use of volunteers. Finally, students will review the role of technology with special attention to information integration and assurance.

AD 553 Rural Municipal Governance 6 Cr.

This graduate level course explores the role of the public service leader, divisions and sectors within the rural municipality, organizing stakeholder collaborations and developing an action plan in support of accountability, good governance, and improvement of quality of life. Specifically, discussions will examine interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary cultural competence and effective leadership skills uniquely identified in rural communities as well as exploration of key issues affecting education, economic development, water supply, sewer systems, internet and broadband access, housing, health care access, and mental health status of those living in rural counties and towns.

AD 554 Principles and Strategies for Sustainability 6 Cr.

AD 555 Public Organization Fiscal Management, Part I 6 Cr.

This course explores in greater depths methods of policy analysis, looking at crosscutting research strategies, identifying and gathering data, data analysis, establishing evaluation criteria, and identifying alternatives. Some of the basic elements of chi-square test, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals, projections techniques versus causal prediction, and methods of projection analysis of historical data are examined.

AD 557 Public Works Administration, Part I 6 Cr.

This course of study focuses on the local, state, regional, and national legal, political, technological, and operational issues key to public works administration in the areas of public utilities, water resources, transportation, facilities and structures, and parks and grounds. Topics include the historical development of, and technological advances in, public works management; the public works policy-making process and current public works policy; internal and external communication challenges; public affairs, enforcement, and emergency management roles of public works officials.

AD 558 Fiscal Management Accounting & Contracting 6 Cr.

This course explores the legal and regulatory foundation for financial reporting and accountability for public organizations. Topics include development of transactions, enactment of appropriations, and incurrence of obligations or encumbrances. Other topics include financial reporting, analysis of governmental financial performance, costing of government services, and auditing of governmental organizations. For course readings students are provided current study guides published by the Association of Government Accountants’ Certified Government Financial Manager, designed specifically to prepare professionals and students for the CGFM certification examination.

AD 559 Fiscal Management Finance/Tax & Budgeting 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to four major areas of financial concern: Preparation of budgets; creating management strategies for the organization based on the principles of strategic financial management; obtaining financial resources from issuing bonds and levying taxes; and managing cash and employee retirement funds. Students will also examine contemporary perspectives on professional ethics and ethical behavior by leaders in the public sector especially in regards to their fiduciary responsibility in investing and managing public funds.

AD 561 Capstone Studies 6 Cr.

The core course in capstone studies provides students the opportunity to synthesize learning from all previous seminars and to apply the concepts and principles in two ways: the preparation of a written capstone project that offers a practical or theoretical solution to a program, operation, policy, problem or issue of contemporary importance and relevance to the work or career goals of each student; and a 1500-word paper suitable for publication in a professional journal. Students will be required to exhibit in-depth critical thinking, policy analysis, and effective writing. Course assignments will maximize the exchange of student suggestions and comments on the various stages of the capstone project, to include but not limited to topic section, thesis, resources and supporting information. Prerequisites: Completion of all prior required core and concentration/elective courses, or permission of the program director.

AD 562 Transformational Organizational Culture, Human Resources Devel and Mngt in NonProfit Organizations 6 Cr.

This course addresses nonprofit organization professional and volunteer staff management, nonprofit law, ethics, and risk management, leadership and governance excellence in nonprofit organizations. The course concentrates heavily on competencies and knowledge, skills, and abilities needed by senior managers with major responsibilities for human resource development and management, board and committee development, volunteer resource management, ethics and ethical behavior, organizational core values, diversity awareness and legal and risk management.

AD 563 Urban Municipal Governance 6 Cr.

This graduate level course introduces students to the public administrator in their role as an elected public service leader committed to identifying, examining, and working collaboratively toward effectively improving municipal services and the quality of life for constituents living in urban America. Particular focus will be placed on multidisciplinary collaborations and action plan development, through discussions and reflections of key issues including the unique needs affecting public safety, emergency management, medical services, animal control, and public and mental health concerns. In addition, discussions will further examine the public administrator’s responsibilities surrounding civic engagement, waste-water, storm water, street maintenance, solid waste collection and disposal, forestry, parks and recreation.

AD 564 International Development and Influence I 6 Cr.

This course focuses on world politics and the historical background of U.S. efforts to foster development in developing countries, foreign policy and levels of analysis, nationalism and globalization (which includes transportation, communications, economic and cultural factors). Transnationalism, with a focus on nongovernmental organizations (NGO’s), religious power, and the women’s movement will be explored. Particular focus will be placed on power, international diplomacy and how states are governed.

AD 565 Public Organization Fiscal Management, Part II 6 Cr.

This seminar examines the formulation of policy, the iterative process, the complexity of joint theories and the relationship between policy, implementation, planning and design. It examines policy formulation, explaining behavior, forecasting effects, policy adoption and evaluation of policy.

AD 567 Public Works Administration, Part II 6 Cr.

This course of study focuses on local, state, regional, and national master public works planning, contract administration and project management; multi-year financing of public works projects; environmental impacts and other cost-benefit analyses, and decision-making modeling; multi-jurisdictional services and public-private joint ventures; and, trends and future challenges.

AD 568 Government Procurement and Contract Management 6 Cr.

Examines the scope, methods, and processes of forming contracts between public and private parties for the purpose of accomplishing the missions of governmental agencies at the international, federal, state/provincial and local level. Designed for individuals considering a career in public administration, persons employed in government agencies, public procurement personnel wishing to enhance their knowledge, and suppliers or citizens interested in learning more about the formulation of government contracts. Subject and foundational areas such as planning, ethics, and of the legal basis of the public procurement function will be examined and explored.

AD 572 Resource Development, Management & Efficiency by Nonprofit Organizations 6 Cr.

This course focuses heavily on competencies and knowledge, skills, and abilities needed by senior managers with major responsibilities in such areas as: financial management, accounting, and economics, fundraising, grant writing, mission-focused information technology and knowledge management for nonprofit organizations. Course objectives and learning outcomes emphasize professional and managerial competencies associated with efficient, resource conservative nonprofits, including: Revenue/Resource Development: Fund-Raising and Grantsmanship; Nonprofit Accountability and Economics; Financial Management and Accounting; Performance/Results Measurement, Analysis, Improvement; Information Technology and Management; and, Knowledge Management.

AD 574 International Development and Influence II 6 Cr.

This course builds on the concepts presented in AD564 International Development I. Students will continue to explore world conditions relevant to international development and influence. In addition to those covered in AD564, conditions explored in this course include the history and roles of intergovernmental organizations, the United Nations, the European Union, international law and human rights. Security issues such as the causes of war, terrorism, unconventional and conventional force, weapons of mass destruction, and global and international security concerns will also be discussed. Finally, the course will examine theories of international political economy, environmental concerns and international cooperation.

AD 575 Tools for Policy Analysis 6 Cr.

This seminar examines and uses the key concepts, tools, and techniques used in scientific research, design, implementation, and evaluation. It examines various methods needed in order to present data using techniques such as SPSS, SAS, R, and Python.

AD 576 Foundations of Leadership and Ethical Decision Making 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of management and leadership in public administration. The course explores major models of leadership from a theoretical, ethical, and practical perspective. Students in this course will gain an understanding of major leadership theories by examining the basis of each theory, evaluating their strengths and weaknesses, and learning how to apply the theory to practical situations in public administration and nonprofit settings. These activities enable students to reflect on how they perceive leadership from both a subordinate and leadership perspective. By the end of this seminar, students will have developed a thorough understanding of leadership concepts, and will be able to apply them in their own leadership situations.

AD 578 Government Contract Management 6 Cr.

Students study the concepts of contract management beginning with crafting the Request for Proposal, (RFP) through contract negotiations,award, and management. Students gain knowledge of government contract management from both the government and the private sector (industry) perspective including all fields of procurement.

AD 582 Healthcare Management 6 Cr.

The course provides learners with managerial competencies – aggregated knowledge, skills and abilities – associated with quality management of healthcare nonprofit organizations. The learning outcomes emphasize competencies outlined and highlighted in the Healthcare Leadership Competency Model and the CPHQ Examination. AD 582 addresses all of the competencies outlined in the NCHL Health Leadership model, including: transformation, execution, and people. The seminar is designed to fully prepare the learner to successfully complete requirements for the professional certification of Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality. Among the main themes of the course are the following: organizational administration of health care facilities, financial management in health care, strategies and methodologies for effective health care planning, information systems planning and management in health care, health care economics, quality management in health care organizations, health care leadership, communications and marketing in the healthcare environment, healthcare quality management, including assessment tools and models and program improvement processes, knowledge and information management, human resource management in healthcare organizations, legal and regulatory issues and policies, and, professional ethics.

AD 585 Economics & Decision Making 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to finance and economic theories, and explains how these concepts are utilized in public sector decision making. The core of the course is the study of best practices for financial, economic, and decisive leadership, including the challenges of providing such direction to a wide scope of departments and agencies. Students evaluate key financial, economic, and decision making principles and strategies. This understanding equips public sector leaders to make decisions based on rational analysis, as well as allows for thoughtful consideration of financial issues pertaining to the current state of the economy, both domestic and global.

AD 586 Public Leadership, Crisis Management, and Organizational Change 6 Cr.

This course explores the role of leadership in public organizations by examining how leadership is intrinsically tied to the organization. Students will gain an understanding of how effective leaders articulate their leadership philosophy, how they embody the ideals and values of the organization, and how they motivate and reward their subordinates. The course also examines the role of leadership in crisis situations including how decisions are made and implemented, how information is communicated in critical situations, how political leaders are held accountable for crisis situations, and how communities can be returned to a state of normalcy after a critical incident has occurred.

AD 590 MPA Portfolio 0 Cr.

The Portfolio is a required element of the MPA Degree Program. Students submit the final graded assignment from each of the first five seminars for evaluation of overall growth and improvement throughout the course of the MPA degree program.

AD 595 Residency 0 Cr.

Religion Courses

RELG 300 Comparative Religion 3 Cr.

Based upon myth and built upon ritual, religious thought affects politics, economics, international relations and security. This course provides learners with the opportunity to explore and analyze the similarities and differences of world religions to better understand the impact of belief systems and religious themes on culture, human history and current affairs. Pre-requisites: None.

Science Courses

SCIE 1XX General Science Competency 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of one of the two required General Science Competencies.

SCIE 202 Science, Technology and Procedures in Forensic Investigations 3 Cr.

The course will focus on the scientific principles behind the recognition, collection, preservation, analysis and interpretation of physical evidence found at a crime scene. This course presents the science and technology used by modern forensic professionals that is best suited for non-science majors. The emphasis is placed on practical forensic applications of scientific principles in the areas of chemistry, physics, biology, geology and others. This is a lab science class where each week the student will have an online lab activity or case study in which to apply the various principles of forensic science covered in the course.

SCIE 2XX Science Elective 6 Cr.

SCIE 301 Environmental Science 3 Cr.

A study of the dynamic interaction between human and environment with emphasis on ecosystem structure and function; the study, analysis and identification of optimal solutions to local and regional environmental issues and problems; and short- and long-term strategies for natural disaster or post-conflict remedial measures. Pre- requisites: none.

SCIE 310 Scien Basis of Sustainability 3 Cr.

Students examine how Sustainability Science has emerged in the 21st Century. Students learn how evidence-based, quantitative data are collected and used to define and monitor sustainability-related issues and problems, and how critical thinking skills are applied to an interdisciplinary understanding of problems and solutions, as well as how information networks can both supply important data and serve as a medium for communicating with other interested parties on a global basis. The course concludes by examining how sustainability science relates to an ever-widening range of decisions, strategies and activities in the private, public and military worlds. Prereq: approval of the Division of Continuing Studies.

Social Science Courses

Sociology Courses

SOCI 1XX Sociology Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Social Science Competency.

SOCI 209 Methods of Social Science Research 3 Cr.

The purpose of this course is to develop a working understanding of social science research and research methodology, with an emphasis on its application within the criminal justice field. The course covers the purposes and rationale for conducting social science research, formulation of research design from problem or issue identification, and descriptions of different research designs and their applications. Pre-requisites: SSMA 232.

SOCI 220 Cultural Issues & CJ System 3 Cr.

This course explores the issues of race and ethnicity as they relate to crime and our criminal justice system in a culturally diverse society. Students will examine the broader social context of race and ethnicity in our American society, with a special focus on the changing ethnicity of communities and related changes in social and institutional public policy. Students will also learn how cultural diversity impacts the roles of the police, our court system, and correctional facilities; how it influences the death penalty; and how it affects juvenile and minority youth justice. Other discussion topics include cross-cultural communication, the implementation of cultural awareness training, multicultural representation in law enforcement, and criminal justice interaction. Pre-requisites: none.

SOCI 322 Drugs and Gangs 3 Cr.

This course analyzes transnational crime and corruption issues within global politics. Focus is given to potential national and international responses to transnational threats. Students also examine the increasing relevance of criminality and governmental corruption and how it becomes a major aspect of national security policy. Pre-requisites: none.

SOCI 325 Public Safety Diverse Society 3 Cr.

Students learn about law enforcement issues in a society with increasing physical, cultural and economic diversity. Topics include women and minorities in policing, conflict resolution, cross cultural communication, building community relationship and partnerships, and controversial issues such as racial profiling. Pre-requisites: none.

SOCI 330 Military Sociology 3 Cr.

This course provides a sociological perspective of the military as both an institution and as an occupation. It examines the social structure and functions of the military and the social factors that influence behavior in and of the military. In terms of function, it examines the changing purposes of the military in view of changing national and international conditions; and in terms of structure, it examines the norms, values, traditions, organizations, and culture of the military. It is designed to provide greater insight into the routine life within the military and into contemporary issues confronting the military. Pre-requisites: none.

SOCI 335 Intro to Cultural Competence 3 Cr.

Students learn key concepts in the study of cultures and explore how culture and cultural contexts and language influence values, expectations, behavior, communication styles and conflict resolution. Pre-requisites: None.

SOCI 401 Culture and Anthropology 6 Cr.

Students complete a study for a particular region in relation to its culture, social groups and organizations, social stratification, and other relevant characteristics of the region. The study will include a comparative analysis of the various cultures and ethnic minorities that exist throughout the region. The study will further explore how the legal structure of the region deals with the cultural challenges and opportunities in the region. The study will include recommendations for improvement and/or strengthening the regions’ societies. The course culminates with a substantive research paper. Pre-requisites: Completion of SOCI 335 or permission of Department Chair.

SOCI 406 Area Studies 6 Cr.

Students complete a study which surveys and evaluates a particular region in relation to its geographic location, diversity and resources. The study should include a summation of the geography of the region and how it relates to implementation of a project or the resolution of a problem in the region. It will examine the current natural resources and resource challenges of the region, paying particular attention to mineral, oil, water and other high valued items present in the region. It will analyze future challenges of the region in terms of geography as well as resources. The study will include recommendations for improvement and/or strengthening the region’s resources. The course will culminate with a substantive research paper.

Strategic Studies Courses