Bachelor’s Degrees

Dean: William H. Clements
Associate Dean of Administration: Debra R. Wick 
Associate Dean of Enrollment Management: John A. Kunelius
Chair, Division of Continuing Studies: Mark L. Parker

The College of Graduate and Continuing Studies is committed to lifelong and experiential learning in a distance education delivery format.  At the undergraduate level, the College offers online bachelor’s degree-completion programs intended for students with experience in the public and private sectors of the workplace, including current and former active-duty military personnel.  These programs consist of the final 60 or 90 credits needed for the bachelor’s degree (in certain programs students with 30 prior credits are eligible to be admitted and to take pre-requisite and General Education courses in preparation for the upper-level course work).  Courses are eight weeks in length and are asynchronous, allowing students to access their virtual classrooms and complete their work at any time and from almost any location.  Undergraduate online classes are taught in an interactive fashion by faculty who have both academic credentials and substantive professional experience in their disciplines.

The College offers five bachelor's degree-completion programs:

This section of the catalog provides information about academic policies, general education requirementsprograms of study, and the residency conference as they pertain to bachelor's degree students in online programs.

Communication Courses

COMM 205 Tech-Mediated Communication 3 Cr.

A study of human communication and the effect of modern technology on it. Students review basic communication theory, including non-verbal and intercultural communication, and then evaluate the impact of technology on the effectiveness and efficiency of communication. Topics include: spoken vs. written communication; synchronous vs. asynchronous communication; the status of world languages on the internet; the impact of social media; modern workplace communication; and trends in the development of communication technology.

COMM 301 Business & ProfessionalWriting 3 Cr.

This course is a study of the role and application of leadership principles to writing in the workplace. Students learn that the writing done in the workplace is not simply a matter of presenting facts and recommendations with an emphasis on clarity and focus; rather, it is the context of the task that drives the value of the resulting writing. Leaders in the workplace write to change lives and, to do so, must understand and manage the impact of their words. This approach requires an analysis of the situation and an analysis of the data used to create the written communication. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a basic, non-developmental college writing course (such as EN101) or its equivalent.

COMM 302 Data Analysis and Writing 3 Cr.

This course is designed to strengthen the technological, analytical, and written communications skills needed in careers in law enforcement, intelligence, and security. Students identify certain key data resources, and apply the data obtained in various communication contexts. The course emphasizes specific types of documents and communication channels used in the law enforcement community. Pre-requisite: SOCI209.

COMM 305 Strategic Communications 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to principles of strategic communication. The course provides a detailed understanding of the important role that participatory web media play in strategic communication. Topics include understanding and defining strategic communication, public diplomacy, who is responsible for conducting strategic communication, challenges of U.S. strategic communication, improving strategic communication, and the future of strategic communication. Practical application of the tenets of strategic communication will be accomplished by reviewing and critiquing high-profile cases from the Iraq war and other significant events. This course will enable students to identify and apply the basic characteristics of effective strategic communication. Prerequisite: None.

COMM 312 Intercultural Communication 3 Cr.

This course prepares the student to communicate effectively in both written and verbal forms within the context of a multi-cultural society. The course covers best practices in investigative reporting, written reports and memos, and interpersonal verbal communication within criminal justice settings, including interactions with victims, suspects, incarcerated persons, government officials, community leaders, staff, and civilians. 3 lecture hours. Pre-requisites: none.

Computer Science Courses

Criminal Justice Courses

CRMJ 1XX Criminal Justice Elective 6 Cr.

CRMJ 201 Foundations Criminal Justice 3 Cr.

This course provides a general survey of the principles, systems, and processes of criminal justice. Students will explore conceptions and definitions of crime, criminal law, due process, and the organization and operation of the three basic components of the criminal justice system – the police, the courts, and corrections – both individually and in relationship to one another. Pre-requisites: none.

CRMJ 303 The Study of Crime 3 Cr.

Students develop their skills in developing and analyzing intelligence. They learn how to collaborate with public and governmental agencies to share intelligence that is critically important to improving public safety and security. Pre-requisite: None.

CRMJ 305 Law Enforcement Administration 3 Cr.

This course applies management and financial principles to criminal justice organizations. Emphasis is placed on budgets, financial accounting principles, and assessing the effectiveness of the activities of criminal justice organizations. Students will also discuss constitutional requirements, court decisions, and legislation (such as EEOC requirements) as they impact management in criminal justice organizations. The purposes and formats of financial statements and basic accounting and financial terminology are introduced: depreciation of assets, capital budgeting, cash management, lease versus purchase, and inventory management. Pre-requisites: none. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

CRMJ 306 Procedural Due Process 3 Cr.

This course examines the principle that the government must respect all of the legal rights that are owed to a person according to the law. Students will explore and examine procedural due process as it relates to the procedure of arresting and trying persons who have been accused of crimes. Students will also examine specific government actions that may deprive an individual of life, liberty, or property. Overall, the course will address the applications and administration of due process as well as potential abuse. Pre-requisites: none.

CRMJ 400 Capstone 6 Cr.

Students analyze and synthesize program learning with a particular focus on ethics and leadership. Students analyze ethical scenarios and a tactical ethics text and present an in-depth ethical analysis paper. Students must address how their work will contribute their department and/or the Law Enforcement and Public Safety collective body of knowledge about the topic(s) under discussion. Pre-requisites: Completion of all BSCJ courses or permission of the Department Chair.

Cyber Security Courses

CYBR 201 Fundamentals of Computer Networking 3 Cr.

This course is the study of the core theories and protocols that are the foundation of computer networking. The Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model and the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), protocol suite are discussed in detail. This course provides a detailed overview of networking terminology, while examining the different networking topologies and architectures. Pre-requisites: none.

CYBR 210 Computer Programming with a High Level Language 3 Cr.

This course covers the fundamental concepts of computer programming, using a high level scripted programming language. The course emphasizes design and implementation standards. This course is designed to provide the skills necessary to become an effective cyber security practitioner. Prerequisite: None.

CYBR 215 Computer Programming with a Low Level Language 3 Cr.

This course covers the fundamental concepts of computer programming, using a low-level scripted programming language. This course is designed to provide the skills necessary to understand basic computer architecture, allowing the cyber security specialist to better identify, understand and remove security threats at the machine level. Pre-requisites: none.

CYBR 220 Windows Server Administration 3 Cr.

This course provides students with the skills necessary to design, implement, manage and protect a Microsoft Windows Server Active Directory Domain. Students apply the lessons learned in this course by implementing an Active Directory Domain in a virtual environment. Pre-requisites: none.

CYBR 225 Linux Administration 3 Cr.

This course provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills to install, configure, upgrade and manage a Linux operating system in an enterprise network. Additionally, students learn to perform normal business operations using the Linux Operating system. Pre-requisites: none.

CYBR 230 Relational Databases with SQL 3 Cr.

This course covers the fundamental concepts of relational databases and the scripted Structure Query Language (SQL) language used to manage them. Students learn how to design functional relational databases that conform to industry standards. Prerequisite: none.

CYBR 320 Vulnerability Testing I 3 Cr.

This course presents the concepts, tools, and techniques used for penetration testing, vulnerability exploitation, assessment, reporting, and forensics; teaches multiple attack vectors as well as the defensive measures protecting against such attacks; focuses heavily on post- attack forensics allowing for a complete picture of the attack process. The seminar introduces several open- source tools such as the Metasploit framework. This seminar includes lab exercises using a virtual computer environment. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

CYBR 370 Introduction to Information Warfare 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the overall concept of Information Warfare (IW) and Information Operations (IO), particularly with regard to the US Federal government and the Department of Defense. Introduction to IW / IO surveys the development of Information Warfare (IW) and Information Operations (IO) as these elements of power have become more important for the United States Department of Defense (DoD) and Federal Government as a whole. The course assumes only a rudimentary familiarity with the basic concepts and terminology of modern Internet usage and computing and is not a technology-focused course. Pre-requisites: none.

CYBR 382 Defensive Information Warfare 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the overall concept of Defensive Information Operations (D-IO), which are conducted across the range of military operations at every level of war to achieve mission objectives. Combatant commanders and mission owners must carefully consider their defensive posture and strategy in order to deter and defeat adversary intrusion while providing mission assurance. Upon completion of this course, students develop a defensive strategy by analyzing risk, cyberspace terrain, mission priorities, and utilizing threat intelligence. Pre-requisite CYBR 370 or Permission of Instructor.

CYBR 400 Cyber Capstone 6 Cr.

This is the Capstone course for all BS in Cyber Security students.

CYBR 410 Systems Assurance 3 Cr.

This course focuses on the design considerations involved with the security of site design. The course will also provide and understanding of the Levels of Trust and system accreditation/certificate processes. Life cycle management of software, hardware, and physical plant, from planning through destruction will be examined and reinforced using case studies. Additionally, understanding of the variety of security systems involving computers and networks and an ability to evaluate vulnerabilities will be discussed. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

CYBR 420 Vulnerability Testing II 3 Cr.

Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

Defense Analysis Courses

SSDA 306 Science and Technology Visual Augmentation Defense Systems 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the primary concepts of visual augmentation defense technology, particularly with regard to its use by the U.S. Federal Government and the Department of Defense. Students learn the history and evolution of optics as well as the scientific principles that underlie development and utilization of selected technologies. Pre-requisites: none.

SSDA 310 Emergency and Disaster Relief Operations 6 Cr.

This course examines the principles used by emergency managers to respond to local or regional disasters. Students examine the NIMS (National Incident Management System) and other standards governing emergency management. Pre-requisites: None.

SSDA 315 Insurgency and Conflict 6 Cr.

Students compare and contrast selected insurgencies and counter-insurgencies from across the globe. Students gain knowledge needed to analyze and establish mission profiles for past, present and future conflicts. Pre-requisite: None.

SSDA 320 Information Operations 6 Cr.

This course introduces students to the overall concept of information warfare (IW) and information operations (IO), particularly in regard to the US federal government and Department of Defense. Pre-requisites: None.

SSDA 325 Law of Armed Conflict and Legal Basis for Use of Force 3 Cr.

A study of the law of armed conflict and the legal use of force. Students review international law theory, including the primary sources of international law, and then evaluate the impact of international law on past, present and future operations. Topics include: international law formulation; rules of engagement; issues surrounding detainees, internees and prisoners of war; air, land and sea laws; and the application of international law as it pertains to military operations. Prerequisites: none.

SSDA 400 The Capstone Project 6 Cr.

Students analyze and synthesize program learning with a particular focus on ethics and leadership. Students analyze ethical scenarios and a tactical ethics text and present an in-depth ethical analysis paper. Students must address how their work will contribute to the U.S. Military’s body of knowledge about the topic(s) under discussion. Pre-requisites: Completion of all SSDA courses or permission of the Department Chair.

Economics Courses

ECON 1XX Economics Elective 6 Cr.

ECON 310 Socio-Economic Studies 3 Cr.

Students explore tenets and characteristics of various economics systems, analyze economic indicators, conceptualize problems and recommend possible solutions. Pre- requisites: None.

ECON 350 Seminar in Economics 3-6 Cr.

Seminar in Economics (3-6): An intensive introduction and overview of the principles of macro and micro economics. The course begins with a high level analysis of the U.S. economy and then moves to a more in-depth look at topics such as production and output, pricing, economic growth, and the challenges of international trade, including issues related to international banking and non-U.S. stock markets.

ECON 351 Seminar in Finance 6 Cr.

In this course students are introduced to the theory and practices of the effective management of money in organizations. Topics covered include: sources and allocation of capital, including budgeting; cash flow analysis; financial markets and organizations; and risk analysis. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

ECON 401 Economic Studies 6 Cr.

In this regional economics course, students complete a research project to analyze the economy of a country or region of interest. Students survey and evaluate the economic institutions and infrastructure of the region. Local, regional and global challenges and opportunities that exist in the region will be explored. The study will include recommendations for improving the well-being of people by strengthening the region’s economic institutions and infrastructure. The course will culminate with a substantive research paper. Pre-requisites: Completion of ECON 310 or permission of Chair of Department of Continuing Studies.

English Courses

ENGL 1XX Basic Expos Writing Competency 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Basic Expository Writing Competency.

ENGL 250 Crime in Literature 3 Cr.

A course in which students read and discuss works of literature that explore the ethical, social, and philosophical implications of criminal behavior and society's response to it. Prerequisite: Either EN102, EN108 or transfer equivalent from prior learning. 3 lecture hours. A recommended literature course for fulfillment of General Education, or Bachelor of Arts degree requirements in Literature, Arts and Humanities, or English.

ENGL 270 Military Literature 3 Cr.

A study of men and women in war and the military service, their ideals, experiences, and strategies as seen in foreign and American military literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. Pre-requisites: EN102 or EN108 or equivalency.

ENGL 2XX Intermed Expos Wrtg Competency 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Intermediate Expository Writing Competency.

ENGL 301 Business& Professional Writing 3 Cr.

A writing-intensive course that focuses on critical business and management documents including organizational and personnel performance reports; business proposals; communications with stakeholders; and marketing instruments. Emphasis is on proper use of the business register; audience analysis; and technology-mediated professional communication. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or its equivalent. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

ENGL 3XX Literature Competency 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required English Literature Competency.

Ethics Courses

Finance Courses

History Courses

HIST 1XX History Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required History Competency.

HIST 210 History of US Constitution 3 Cr.

A study of the political, economic, and social contexts of the creation of the Constitution and the significant amendments to it. Emphasis is on the role of the judicial branch in constitutional matters; the effects of social change in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries; and the impact of technology on contemporary constitutional issues.

HIST 310 Historical Studies 3 Cr.

This is an overview of the historical development of political, cultural and economic behavior of institutions within a specific geographical context. Students will focus on a specific region, e.g., the Middle East, Latin America, Sub-Sahara Africa or Asia. Students will explore and develop an in-depth understand of the history of a region and the impact of that history on current events. Pre-requisites: none.

HIST 411 History of Diplomacy I 3 Cr.

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview and analysis of diplomacy and international relations from 1648 to 1914. The course focuses on the historical foundations of the modern state system and on the effects of globalization and its influence on decision-making in diplomacy. The course is offered three times per year and is eight weeks in length. Prerequisite: Permission of the program manager.

HIST 412 History of Diplomacy II 3 Cr.

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview and analysis of diplomacy and international relations from 1914 to the present. The course builds on the material covered in HIST 411 – History of Diplomacy I and focuses on the historical foundations of the modern state system and on the effects of globalization and its influence on decision-making in diplomacy. The course is offered three times per year and is eight weeks in length. Prerequisite: HIST 411.

Humanities Courses

Independent Study Courses

INDE 490 Selected Topics 6 Cr.

Students will study a specific topic of interest under the direction of a faculty member. Pre-requisites: To be determined on an individual basis.

Information Operations Courses

INOP 1XX Information Ops Elective 6 Cr.

INOP 302 Cyber Crime and Security 3 Cr.

This course provides an in-depth understanding of how science and technology impacts national security and intelligence. It examines how important hard science and technology is in developing areas of national security and intelligence. This includes analyzing cyber-security and cyber-warfare, the emerging relationship between the Intelligence Community (IC) and Information Technology (IT), space reconnaissance, and high-tech domestic espionage. Pre-requisites: none. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

INOP 310 Emergency & Disaster Relief 6 Cr.

This course examines how emergency managers respond to national, state, or local disasters. Students gain a broad understanding of the functions, challenges, key concepts and organizing principles of U.S. emergency management. Emphasis is placed on how emergency management is structured and organized by examining the National Response Framework (NRF), the National Incident Management System (NIMS), and the Incident Command System (ICS) as well as other standards that govern emergency management in the United States. Students will apply their learning to develop an emergency plan capable of addressing identified threats. This course requires broad knowledge, in-depth understanding, analysis, synthesis, and creativity in regard to the topics addressed. Pre-requisites: none. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

INOP 316 Info Ops & Infrastructure 3 Cr.

This course focuses on the skills required to operate a security program in an organization and the practical application of security practices. Topics include security structure, leading security projects, policy management, human factors of security, and physical security methods. Pre-requisites: none. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

Intelligence/Security Courses

INSC 1XX Intelligence/Security Elective 6 Cr.

INSC 311 Intro Homeland Security Intell 3 Cr.

This course addresses the functions of homeland security, critical infrastructure, and asset protection as they relate to government, industry, and the community. The key functions of threat prevention, crisis response, and operations recovery are addressed from a variety of perspectives given that homeland security is a responsibility that is shared by government agencies, the private sector, and individuals, encompassing a broad spectrum of professional career positions throughout our society. This course provides an overview of the elements involved in the homeland security function, as well as the challenges critical infrastructure managers in government and industry can/will face while maintaining mission operations and staff accountability in the midst of multiple overlapping roles and responsibilities in our rapidly changing world.

INSC 313 Global Security & Intelligence 3 Cr.

This course examines a range of contemporary international issues – from questions of realism versus idealism in foreign affairs to changes in the nation-state, the rise and influence of member states in the Pacific Rim, and overall global security objectives. It will explore the uses of strategic intelligence by world leaders in shaping policy and the effects of strategic intelligence on world events. Students will be required to closely follow international developments and learn how to discuss them objectively and analytically. Areas of emphasis include science, technology, and globalization as the environment in which concepts of international security evolve and change over time. Pre-requisites: none. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

INSC 315 Security Coordin&Collaboration 3 Cr.

This course focuses on the significance of sharing and coordinating information across all levels of government to support homeland security partners in preventing, protecting against, and responding to crime and terrorism. It explores the role of fusion centers and how these centers serve the specific needs of their jurisdictions while supporting the broader homeland and national security enterprise. Fusion centers overlay national intelligence with local, state, and regional information, enhancing understanding of the threat environment across all levels of government. They augment the federal government’s analytic capability and enhance situational awareness in order to protect the nation. Pre-requisites: none.

INSC 320 Intelligence Management 3 Cr.

Students develop their skills in developing and analyzing intelligence. They learn how to collaborate with public and governmental agencies to share intelligence that is critically important to improving public safety and security. Pre-requisite: None.

Interdisciplinary Studies Courses

Management Courses

MNGT 309 Mngt of Organizations 3 Cr.

A study of the functions of modern management: planning, organization, staffing, leading, and controlling. This study is applicable to the management of military, government, educational and non-profit, as well as business organizations. The ethical and social responsibilities of management and contemporary challenges such as the internationalization of organizations are integrated in all aspects of this course. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 311 Operations & Project Mngt 3 Cr.

This course is designed to introduce a broad overview of operations and project management, while exploring a number of important concepts critical to achieving operations and project management success. Operations management is broad in scope, encompassing products and services in a multitude of forms. These products and services range from the cars we drive, the computers we use, the Internet we access, to military operations that safeguard our county. In effect, operations management, as a field, encompasses the activities and tasks that create value for the goods and services all of us use in a variety of ways. In addition, this course will explore project management from the focus on the "nuts and bolts" or fundamentals of project management and practices, and how is supports operations management strategic goals and objectives. We'll also examine some of the key elements of project management from the project management life cycle, key processes and important tools, techniques and measurements of project. Pre-requisites: None. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 315 Leadership 3 Cr.

In this course students learn key theoretical models of leadership and apply them to a range of situations in both military and non-military organizations. Students identify key functions and skills of effective leaders, explore leadership styles through study of selected leaders and evaluate the role of communication, negotiation, strategy, purpose and ethics in leadership. Prerequisite: none.

MNGT 320 Strategic Planning 3 Cr.

This course is designed to enhance the critical and creative thinking skills needed to solve complex and ill-defined problems. The key themes are problem framing, operational art, leadership, and the outcomes for human security. Students focus on historical and contemporary examples of strategic level planning in highly complex operations and use this learning as a framework for problem solving within and across agencies. Students complete a major team project that leverages skills learned to focus on a complex problem vignette that requires creating a course of action for the leader to meet the desired end state. There are no pre-requisites.

MNGT 330 Management Information Systems 3 Cr.

In this course students examine the information technology solutions and systems available for use in the management of organizations. Topics covered include: hardware and software components; database technologies; enterprise systems; telecommunications and networking; and decision support systems. Throughout the course emphasis is placed on the importance of system integration for maximum efficiency and on the challenges of a rapidly changing IT sector. Students conclude with an examination of the ethical and human resource challenges of the use of management information systems. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 400 Management Capstone 6 Cr.

this is the required Capstone course for BS in Management Studies students.

MNGT 401 Sem in Leadership I:Fundamntls 6 Cr.

This course focuses on differentiating the conceptual and theoretical aspects and models of leadership and leadership studies. The fundamentals of leadership are taught within the context of present and past leaders, with an emphasis on how to practice these fundamentals in an ethical manner.

MNGT 402 Sem in Leadership II Styles EQ 6 Cr.

This seminar focuses on differentiating the conceptual and theoretical aspects and models of Emotional Intelligence (EQ). The course provides students the opportunity to explore the key EQ skills that contribute to a leader’s success. Through the course, students build a foundational understanding of EQ by exploring emotions, behavior, and EQ history. Students learn about the skills, attitudes, and behaviors of people with high (or varying degrees) of EQ, as well as how individuals can cultivate those skills.

MNGT 403 Leadership of Change 3 Cr.

This course is a study of change management principles and best practices from a leadership vantage point. Emphasis is on the process of planning for change and the critical role of communication before, during, and after change. Students develop instruments for measuring the impact of change on human and financial resources within organizations.

MNGT 404 Leadershp in Tech-Driven World 3 Cr.

This course focuses on the application of leadership principles toward efforts to manage the impact of modern information and communication technologies on organizations. Topics include: creating and leading a remote workforce; human behavior in technology-mediated work relationships; and ethical issues arising from the use of technology.

MNGT 411 Seminar Public Sector Mngt I 6 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 412 Seminar Public Sector Mngt II 6 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 413 Ethics in Public Sector Mngt 3 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 414 Legal and Regulatory Envrnmnt 3 Cr.

MNGT 421 Sem in Human Resource Mngt I 6 Cr.

An introduction to the major functional areas of the human resource operation. Topics covered include: recruitment; staffing; position classification; employee relations; separations; and employment law. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 422 Sem in Human Resource Mngt II 6 Cr.

Building on the content of MNGT 421, this course examines additional human resource operations and concerns including benefits; employee training and development; conflict resolution; and quality of work life. Prerequisite: MNGT421. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 423 Human Capital Planning 3 Cr.

This course examines human capital planning from a leadership perspective. Students begin by gaining an understanding of the human capital planning process, the benefits to the organization, and linkages to organizational strategic planning and performance. They then learn ways to foster leadership engagement in the human capital process and to use quantitative and qualitative methods to gather and analyze the data necessary to create and implement a successful human capital plan. Note: This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 431 Seminar in Technology Mngt I 6 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 432 Seminar in Technology Mngt II 6 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 433 Project Management I 3 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

MNGT 434 Project Management II 3 Cr.

This course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

Mathematics Courses

MATH 1XX Math Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Basic College Mathematics Competency.

MATH 232 Elementary Statistics 3 Cr.

A course that covers the study of frequency distributions, averages and standard deviations, normal curve, probability, decision-making, sampling techniques, testing hypotheses, chi-square, students-t and F-distributions, correlation and linear regression. Prerequisite: A college level mathematics course or equivalent as determined by departmental placement testing.

MATH 2XX Math Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Intermediate College Mathematics Competency.

Philosophy Courses

PHLS 1XX Philosophy Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Ethics Competency.

PHLS 205 Critical Thinking 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the critical thinking skills and techniques needed in academic and research endeavors. Topics covered include formal and informal logic; the structure of logical systems; argumentation; and the relationship of logic to research and the scientific method. Emphasis is placed on learning to recognize common logical fallacies.

PHLS 210 Ethics in the Modern World 3 Cr.

A study of ethics and its application to problems in everyday life, society, and the broader world. The course examines the principal moral theories and ethical systems that have shaped our personal values and behavior, including consequentialist and non-consequentialist theories, virtue ethics, and feminist ethics. Students explore the connections between ethics and religion and examine the challenges to morals posed by relativism, subjectivism and emotivism, and egoism. Students also evaluate positions, theories, and arguments as they apply them to concrete matters of personal, socio-political, and global concern.

PHLS 324 Criminal Justice Ethics 3 Cr.

This course provides a short introduction to general ethics, with applications to practices and problems in the criminal justice field. It uses the case study method to focus on immediate decisions which involve ethical dilemmas and typically face criminal justice professionals in the police, courts, and corrections. It also studies a selection of more general issues involving the criminal justice system which are of common public concern, as well as the deeper question of why certain forms of behavior should or should not be criminalized. In this connection, a selection of recent high-profile Supreme and Appeals Court cases in the areas of civil rights and civil liberties will be discussed. The emphasis is on developing discussion skills and familiarity with essential patterns of legal and moral reasoning. This course satisfies the University's General Education Ethics requirement. 3 lecture hours.

Political Science Courses

POLS 1XX Political Science Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Social Science Competency.

POLS 302 National Security Policy 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the issues and institutions of national security policy. Successful students will have an appreciation of strategic thought and strategy formulation, the ability to assess national security issues and threats, and an understanding of the political and military institutions invovled in the making and execution of national security policy. Pre-requisites: none.

POLS 306 Comparative Politics 3 Cr.

This course introduces students to the basic methods, concepts and substance of comparative politics. Special attention will be paid to institutions and behaviors as well as development and modernization theories. The course provides students with tools to address such questions as: What is a political system? What are the different varieties of democracies and authoritarian regimes? Are some regimes more vulnerable to political violence than others? What explains the transition from authoritarianism to democracy and can that process be reversed? How does geography impact the political, economic, and social development of a region? Pre- requisites: none.

POLS 316 Domestic Terrorism 3 Cr.

This course traces the history, emergence, and growth of domestic terrorist and extremist groups within the United States. Students will assess various groups' intentions, capabilities, and activities within contexts of and ramifications on political, national security, and legal paradigms. Topics include current and active domestic groups and their organizational structure, philosophies, and networks. Pre-requisites: none.

POLS 318 International Terrorism 3 Cr.

This course addresses the effects of a variety of forms of sub-state violence on world affairs. Topics include sources of terrorism, its major characteristics, the problems it poses for global peace and stability, responses to terrorism by countries and international organizations, and the problem of balancing public safety and personal freedom in dealing with terrorism. Pre-requisites: none.

POLS 325 Immigration Law and Policy 3 Cr.

This course touches upon the major policy debates currently swirling around immigration reform and policy. Students will examine social changes and the development of immigration law over the last few decades, including the emergence and role of social change movements. Other topics to be explored include undocumented immigration, international coordination on migration, judicial review and due process, refugee and asylum policy, immigration and employment, border security, state and local enforcement of immigration law, and the relationship between immigration law and crime. Pre-requisites: none. Note: this course is under development and will be reviewed by the University Curriculum Committee.

Religion Courses

RELG 300 Comparative Religion 3 Cr.

Based upon myth and built upon ritual, religious thought affects politics, economics, international relations and security. This course provides learners with the opportunity to explore and analyze the similarities and differences of world religions to better understand the impact of belief systems and religious themes on culture, human history and current affairs. Pre-requisites: None.

Science Courses

SCIE 1XX General Science Competency 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of one of the two required General Science Competencies.

SCIE 202 Science, Technology and Procedures in Forensic Investigations 3 Cr.

The course will focus on the scientific principles behind the recognition, collection, preservation, analysis and interpretation of physical evidence found at a crime scene. This course presents the science and technology used by modern forensic professionals that is best suited for non-science majors. The emphasis is placed on practical forensic applications of scientific principles in the areas of chemistry, physics, biology, geology and others. This is a lab science class where each week the student will have an online lab activity or case study in which to apply the various principles of forensic science covered in the course.

SCIE 2XX Science Elective 6 Cr.

SCIE 301 Environmental Science 3 Cr.

A study of the dynamic interaction between human and environment with emphasis on ecosystem structure and function; the study, analysis and identification of optimal solutions to local and regional environmental issues and problems; and short- and long-term strategies for natural disaster or post-conflict remedial measures. Pre- requisites: none.

Social Science Courses

Sociology Courses

SOCI 1XX Sociology Elective 6 Cr.

This course is used for transfer when no equivalent Norwich course exists. This course indicates successful demonstration of the required Social Science Competency.

SOCI 209 Methods of Social Science Research 3 Cr.

The purpose of this course is to develop a working understanding of social science research and research methodology, with an emphasis on its application within the criminal justice field. The course covers the purposes and rationale for conducting social science research, formulation of research design from problem or issue identification, and descriptions of different research designs and their applications. Pre-requisites: SSMA 232.

SOCI 220 Cultural Issues & CJ System 3 Cr.

This course explores the issues of race and ethnicity as they relate to crime and our criminal justice system in a culturally diverse society. Students will examine the broader social context of race and ethnicity in our American society, with a special focus on the changing ethnicity of communities and related changes in social and institutional public policy. Students will also learn how cultural diversity impacts the roles of the police, our court system, and correctional facilities; how it influences the death penalty; and how it affects juvenile and minority youth justice. Other discussion topics include cross-cultural communication, the implementation of cultural awareness training, multicultural representation in law enforcement, and criminal justice interaction. Pre-requisites: none.

SOCI 322 Drugs and Gangs 3 Cr.

This course analyzes transnational crime and corruption issues within global politics. Focus is given to potential national and international responses to transnational threats. Students also examine the increasing relevance of criminality and governmental corruption and how it becomes a major aspect of national security policy. Pre-requisites: none.

SOCI 325 Public Safety Diverse Society 3 Cr.

Students learn about law enforcement issues in a society with increasing physical, cultural and economic diversity. Topics include women and minorities in policing, conflict resolution, cross cultural communication, building community relationship and partnerships, and controversial issues such as racial profiling. Pre-requisites: none.

SOCI 330 Military Sociology 3 Cr.

This course provides a sociological perspective of the military as both an institution and as an occupation. It examines the social structure and functions of the military and the social factors that influence behavior in and of the military. In terms of function, it examines the changing purposes of the military in view of changing national and international conditions; and in terms of structure, it examines the norms, values, traditions, organizations, and culture of the military. It is designed to provide greater insight into the routine life within the military and into contemporary issues confronting the military. Pre-requisites: none.

SOCI 335 Intro to Cultural Competence 3 Cr.

Students learn key concepts in the study of cultures and explore how culture and cultural contexts and language influence values, expectations, behavior, communication styles and conflict resolution. Pre-requisites: None.

SOCI 401 Culture and Anthropology 6 Cr.

Students complete a study for a particular region in relation to its culture, social groups and organizations, social stratification, and other relevant characteristics of the region. The study will include a comparative analysis of the various cultures and ethnic minorities that exist throughout the region. The study will further explore how the legal structure of the region deals with the cultural challenges and opportunities in the region. The study will include recommendations for improvement and/or strengthening the regions’ societies. The course culminates with a substantive research paper. Pre-requisites: Completion of SOCI 335 or permission of Department Chair.

SOCI 406 Area Studies 6 Cr.

Students complete a study which surveys and evaluates a particular region in relation to its geographic location, diversity and resources. The study should include a summation of the geography of the region and how it relates to implementation of a project or the resolution of a problem in the region. It will examine the current natural resources and resource challenges of the region, paying particular attention to mineral, oil, water and other high valued items present in the region. It will analyze future challenges of the region in terms of geography as well as resources. The study will include recommendations for improvement and/or strengthening the region’s resources. The course will culminate with a substantive research paper. Pre-requisites: Completion of HIST 310 Historical Studies or permission of Department Chair.